The Best Undergraduate Business Schools

Macalester CollegeNaturally, ambitious high school students who plan to pursue a career in business want to take a close look at the undergraduate business school rankings published every year. They understand that graduating from one of the top undergraduate business schools can increase their chances of landing a job at a growing company. But what qualities differentiate these undergraduate business schools from all of the others?

Discover some of the most desirable features that the best undergrad business schools have to offer their students:

Qualified Faculty Members
Highly ranked undergraduate business schools have a faculty made up of knowledgeable professors. Often, these schools hire professors who have several years of experience working for a company or corporation. Consequently, students are learning from individuals who have practical knowledge of the business world. Plus, many of the best business schools limit the number of students in each class. As a result, each student is able to receive individual attention from their professor. This allows students to get the most value out of each of their courses.

Students who are curious about their chances of getting into a particular undergraduate school can use Veritas Prep’s free admissions calculator. Our calculator compares a person’s GPA, test scores, and other information with the data of students admitted into a particular college. Students can use the results provided by our admissions calculator to help them decide which undergraduate business schools to apply to.

A Thorough Program of Study
The top business schools provide undergraduate students with a thorough program of study. This type of program includes courses in Economics, Management, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Accountancy, Marketing, Analytics, and Data Science. When a student graduates from a high-ranking school, they will have knowledge of many different areas of business.

Internship Opportunities
Many of the top undergrad business schools have solid relationships with well-known companies and corporations. This opens the door to a variety of internship opportunities for students at the school. Getting an internship at a profitable company can help a student to gain the experience they need to get a great job after graduation. Furthermore, a student who works as an intern can establish contacts with professionals who work at the company. These contacts can be helpful resources as an individual begins to search for a job after graduation.

Executive Speakers
Many of the top undergraduate business schools invite executives to speak to classes of students. These executives share insights and experiences that give students a clear picture of what it’s like to work in the business world. One student may decide to pursue work in a particular area of business after listening to an executive speaker. Another student may plan to apply for work at a specific company after hearing about the company’s goals from a visiting professional. The best undergraduate business schools recognize the value that guest speakers bring to the student body.

A Variety of Financial Aid Options
Undergraduate business schools that are highly ranked provide students with a selection of financial aid options. These schools are looking for well-qualified, determined students who are dedicated to getting the most out of their education. They offer several financial aid options so students from all backgrounds have the opportunity to earn a business degree, as most schools want a campus full of students with different beliefs and interests.

Recruitment Opportunities
The top business schools for undergraduate students attract recruiters from profitable companies and corporations. Seniors have the opportunity to talk with many representatives of these companies to find out about employment opportunities after they graduate. Many of the best business schools can claim that a large percentage of their graduates are hired by these companies every year. The opportunity to work for a well-known company is an enticing factor for many high school students in search of an undergraduate business school.

Our team at Veritas Prep helps high school students prepare for the SAT and ACT by giving them the strategies they need to master each part of these exams. Our prep courses are available both online and in-person. We also have a staff of experienced admissions consultants who can help students with their college applications. We understand the importance of submitting an impressive application to the best undergraduate business schools throughout the country – contact Veritas Prep today and let us assist you on the path toward business school!

Do you still need to help with your college applications? We can help! Visit our College Admissions website and fill out our FREE Profile Evaluation for personalized feedback on your unique background! And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+, and Twitter!

4 Reasons to Consider a Part-Time MBA

scottbloomdecisionsWith the decision to pursue one’s MBA comes the equally large decision as to whether or not one should attend business school part-time or full-time.

While the majority of MBA applicants each year pursue the more traditional full-time MBA programs, there are many reasons that why a part-time MBA might be a better fit for you:

1) You Have a Below-Average Undergraduate Record
While your college record will, of course, still considered by part-time MBA programs, these types of programs tend to be more forgiving of poor college grades – especially if you attended college many years ago and you have had a lot of professional successes since then.

2) You Are a Career Enhancer
Are you looking to move ahead in your current industry or even within your company? Consider continuing to gain that work experience (and the salary and benefits that come with it) while attending a part-time MBA program. Additionally, many companies will offer continuing education benefits, so check with your current company to see if this is something they will provide.

3) You Work in a Family Business or Own Your Own Business
Rather than having to choose between ditching your family obligations or selling your business and attending school, why not do both? A part-time MBA program is great for those who want to continue working while they learn.

4) You Have Many Years of Work Experience
While part-time MBA students, on average, have only two more years of work experience than their full-time MBA counterparts, the spread tends to be much greater – with applicants’ experience ranging from two to twenty years. If you have a lot of work experience, you may find yourself alongside peers with more similar responsibilities and tenure in a part-time program than you would in a full-time classroom.

If any of the above sound like you, then you may find more success in a part-time MBA program than you would attending business school full time.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Nita Losoponkul, a Veritas Prep consultant for UCLA, received her undergraduate degree in Engineering from Caltech and went from engineering to operations to global marketing to education management/non-profit. Her non-traditional background allows her to advise students from many areas of study, and she has successfully helped low GPA students get admitted into UCLA. 

Life After College: Getting a Head Start

study aboard girlPost-graduation depression is all too common. Students spend four years poring over textbooks and slogging through all-nighters to graduate with a degree, only to realize after graduation that they really have no idea what to do with it. The shift from a few classes a day to a 40-hour workweek, along with a social shift away from large groups of people your own age, often makes graduation a difficult transition period.

I graduated six months ago and ran into this crisis myself. I was lucky: I had done a few internships, read up on jobs I’d like to pursue, and connected with mentors who have been invaluable in guiding me through the process of starting a career, but I still spent plenty of long nights trying to figure out how to navigate the working world, and wondering if I was prepared enough to pull it off.

Here are three things I’m grateful I did, and three things I wish I had done, to better prepare myself for life after graduation:

I did internships in my field.
I knew from the start of my undergraduate career that I was interested in politics and international relations, but I didn’t know where in that vast field I might fit best. By completing a wide range of internships, I became acquainted with the work culture in my field, and I learned about the types of work environments I function best in, the types of work I’m best suited to, and the types of organizations I prefer to work for. Internships helped me find exactly which jobs I wanted to apply for after graduation, and boosted my resume to make me a better candidate for those positions.

I graduated with a degree in a field I love.
It’s hard to study a subject for four years if you’re not really interested in it. It’s even harder to jump headfirst in a career rooted in that subject – 40 hours (or more) per week is a lot of time to pour into something you don’t really care about. It’s never too late to choose a different field, but it’s much easier to make the switch earlier on than later.

I kept learning outside of class.
I went to office hours, built relationships with professors, and did the optional readings on the syllabus. Life is structured around learning in college, but after graduation, learning takes initiative; when nobody assigns you readings or schedules your exams, it’s easy to let your understanding of your field slip. I developed my sense of educational initiative while I still had a strong external learning system supporting me, and was able to lean on that initiative after I left that system.

I should have only taken the classes I was really interested in.
Contrary to my freshman year beliefs, taking more classes didn’t automatically mean I would become a better student or a smarter person; I only really gained from, and engaged with, classes I sincerely found interesting.

I should have spent more time on extracurricular activities and internships.
Classes gave me the academic foundation I needed to pursue a career in the international relations field, but the social skills, leadership skills, and professional skills I gleaned from extracurricular activities and internships were just as important in preparing me for the real world.

I should have taken more classes outside of my specialization.
By zeroing in on political science my freshman year, and devoting any open space in my schedule to even more political science classes, I closed myself off to other interesting and important fields. A better understanding of computer science, biology, economics, literature, art, and other subjects would not only have made me a more educated and well-rounded person, but would also have enhanced my understanding of political science. The world isn’t clearly divided into academic fields – all fields intersect, and I would have become surer of my own interests and opinions earlier on if I had been exposed to more opinions and potential interests.

Life after graduation doesn’t need to be so intimidating – learn from the tips above to ensure your transition from college to the real world is as smooth as possible.

Do you still need to help with your college applications? We can help! Visit our College Admissions website and fill out our FREE Profile Evaluation for personalized feedback on your unique background! And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+, and Twitter!

Courtney Tran is a student at UC Berkeley, studying Political Economy and Rhetoric. In high school, she was named a National Merit Finalist and National AP Scholar, and she represented her district two years in a row in Public Forum Debate at the National Forensics League National Tournament.

How to Prepare For Your MBA as an Undergraduate Student

Make Studying FunAre you already considering pursuing an MBA as an undergraduate student? There is no better time to start thinking about a graduate education in business than while you are wrapping up your undergraduate education. This time in your life will afford you the most flexibility with regards to making the decisions that may successfully set you up for the rest of your business career.

The most important thing to keep in mind as you think through your business school strategy is to be flexible. Do not plan so rigidly that you are incapable of adapting to the natural shifts, changes and ad hoc opportunities that life offers. Be focused throughout your career journey, but make sure you are also affording yourself some flexibility.

Career Trajectory
Thinking through how best to achieve your future career goals, and if business school makes sense as a part of this, are natural first steps for most undergrads. Really think through whether or not pursuing an MBA is something you would eventually like to do, and if it will have the desired impact on your career.

I would caution, however, against pursuing career paths that you generally have little interest in simply to maximize your positioning for a top-tier MBA. College is an exploratory time where you should start to filter through industries and functions that excite you – the better you can narrow your career focus early on, the less wasted time you will ultimately have in your post-undergrad career.

GPA
Your GPA is one of few aspects of your profile that you really cannot alter or improve after graduation. So, while you’re still in undergrad, it is important to bank some equity in your future application with a high GPA. Don’t fall for the myth that your grades do not matter after undergrad once you enter the workforce – your GPA can follow you (positively or negatively) throughout your career.

GMAT
Take the GMAT! Take the GMAT! Take the GMAT while you are still in undergrad! Commonly held wisdom suggest that if you are already in study mode as a student, it will be much easier for you to excel on this exam, so find some time to focus on your prepare early. Once you enter the working world, it is often difficult to find time to dedicate yourself to comprehensive GMAT prep.

Extra-Curricular Activities
College is also a great time to explore activities that interest you on campus. Aligning your passions with leadership and teamwork opportunities – be that in athletics, volunteering, or professional or social clubs – can really distinguish you as a future candidate. These experiences also provide great essay fodder and strong interpersonal anecdotes that definitely help differentiate applicants as a whole.

Take advantage of the tips above to get ahead of the curve as an undergraduate student so that you can breeze through your MBA application process in the future.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants. You can read more articles by him here.