How Does Scoring Differ Between the GMAT and the GRE?

SAT/ACT

It’s a new year, and thus a good time to undertake a new intellectual challenge. For me, this challenge will take the form of teaching new classes on GRE preparation. Because the test has changed so much over the years, I thought it might be interesting to delineate my impressions of the newer incarnation, both in terms of how the GRE differs from the GMAT and in terms of how the GRE has evolved over time.

Observation 1: The formats are different.

 The GRE has two Quantitative sections and two Verbal sections of 30 minutes each, while the GMAT has a single Quantitative section and a single Verbal section of 75 minutes each. Moreover, while the GMAT is adaptive by the question, the GRE is adaptive by section.  Do well on the first GRE Quantitative section and the entire next section will escalate in difficulty. (My impression: while the GRE does adjust from section to section, it does so in a way that feels significantly subtler than the GMAT exam.)

Observation 2: The two Quantitative sections on the GRE are much easier than the one Quantitative section on the GMAT.

This is typically the most conspicuous difference test-takers notice. In our GMAT courses, we have a skill-builder section that allows students to re-master the basics before delving into a discussion about the types of higher-order thinking the GMAT will require. In other words, it’s not enough to simply recall the various rules, axioms, and equations we’ve forgotten from high school – those foundational elements will need to be applied in creative ways. While the GRE does require some higher-order thinking, on many quantitative questions simply having the foundational skills is enough to arrive at the correct answer. The strategic element is more about how to arrive at these answers in a timely manner and how to avoid panicking on the few hairier questions that will likely come your way.

Moreover, in lieu of the GMAT’s dreaded Data Sufficiency questions, the GRE has Quantitative Comparison questions, in which a test-taker is asked to compare the relative magnitude of two quantities – it’s possible that one quantity is larger than the other, that the two quantities are equal, or that it’s not possible to determine which quantity is larger. After grappling with knotty Data Sufficiency questions, a test-taker is likely to find Quantitative Comparison to be blessedly straightforward. Better yet, the GRE will allow you to return to questions once you’ve answered them, granting test-takers more opportunities to weed out careless mistakes. If that weren’t enough, on the GRE, you’ll have access to an on-screen calculator. So there are perks.

Observation 3: The GRE’s scoring algorithm is much less forgiving than the GMAT’s.

Of course, there’s a rub. The GRE’s Quantitative section might be easier in terms of the difficulty level of the questions, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s easier to score well. If you’re able to ascend to the more difficult question levels on the GMAT, you can miss many of them and still do well. Not so on the GRE, where you need to be pretty close to perfect to achieve an elite score.

Observation 4:  The Verbal on the GRE can be trickier.

Like the GMAT, the GRE has a Reading Comprehension component. But unlike the GMAT, the GRE questions will often ask you to select “all that apply,” meaning that you may need to select as many as three correct assertions in order to receive credit for a question. Select two of the three? You get the question wrong. No partial credit. And while the GRE doesn’t have any Sentence Correction questions, it does have Sentence Completion questions, and these questions often come down to either recognizing somewhat obscure vocabulary words or utilizing more familiar words in less familiar ways.

Ultimately, in my experience, most test-takers will score at comparable percentile levels if they were to take both exams. Choosing which test is better for you might be a question of fit or comfort more than anything else. And while there’s a fair amount of overlap between the two exams, they feel different enough that you wouldn’t want to prepare for one and simply assume that you’re ready for the other. Each test has its own strategic texture and its own idiosyncrasies, so you want to be sure that you’ve worked through a curriculum specifically designed for the test in question before you sit for the exam.

Regardless of whether you take the GMAT or GRE, Veritas Prep is committed to helping you prepare to do your best on test day! Jump start your prep by taking advantage of Veritas Prep’s various free GMAT resources and free GRE resources to determine which test is right for you.


This article was written by Veritas Prep instructor David Goldstein. Be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter for more helpful articles like these!

What is an Average GRE Score?

GMATIndividuals who want to take the Graduate Record Examination, or GRE, must do a lot of prep work. Most students have many questions about the test, among them: What is the average GRE score? They want to know so they have an idea of the scores other students around the country receive. Take a look at some average GRE scores, and learn how our talented team at Veritas Prep helps students to highlight their academic skills on this test.

What Is the Average GRE Score?
Before looking at the average scores on the revised GRE, it’s helpful to know the scoring range for each section of the test. A student can receive a score of anywhere between 130 and 170 on the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative sections. On the Analytical Writing section, students can score from 0 to 6 points, in half point increments. On the GRE, average scores are as follows: 150.2 points for the Verbal Reasoning section, 152.5 points for the Quantitative section, and 3.5 points for the Analytical Writing section.

Most schools display the average test scores of their applicants on their official websites. Students who visit the website of a particular school to read its admission guidelines can often find out the average GRE scores of students who gain acceptance into the institution. This is a good way for a student to find out what he or she needs to achieve on the GRE in order to make it into a particular graduate school.

Growing Stronger in Every Subject on the GRE
Taking a practice test is one of the most effective ways of finding a student’s strengths and weaknesses on the GRE. With the help of his or her instructor, a student is able to pinpoint skills that need improvement. This prevents a student from devoting too much study time to skills that he or she already knows.

Once a student realizes what needs improvement, he or she can receive guidance from a Veritas Prep instructor regarding how to sharpen those skills. In many cases, our instructors provide students with a whole new way to approach a reading question or a math equation. Not surprisingly, many students continue to practice the skills they learn at Veritas Prep all of the way through graduate school! Once students begin to strengthen specific skills for the GRE, they gain a new sense of confidence and a more positive attitude toward the test.

Strategies and Tips for the GRE
We understand that most students want to excel on the GRE. Average scores are seen as a baseline by ambitious students who want their graduate school application to stand out in a crowd. The strategies our instructors share with students help them to complete the test in the most efficient way possible.

For instance, we teach students how to filter out the most significant parts of a written passage so they can determine the correct answer option. We also offer students strategies that assist them in simplifying complicated math equations. We guide students in learning how to jot down an outline that includes elements that will help them to create two organized essays for the test. Our professional instructors are very familiar with the GRE, so they are able to convey tips to students based on their own test-taking experiences.

The Night Before the Test
Veritas Prep students benefit in a number of different ways from our GRE prep courses as well as our first-rate study resources. But, there are additional things they can do to feel ready for the test. For instance, the evening before the test students can be sure to eat a nutritious dinner with plenty of protein as well as fruits and vegetables. A healthy meal the night before the test can set the stage for a successful test day. Also, students are wise to get to bed early so they feel well-rested the next day. Trying to cram information the night before the GRE is non-productive and adds to a student’s stress level.

Students can contact our staff by telephone or email to find out more about our GRE prep services. We are glad to offer more information about our online or in-person courses. At Veritas Prep, we want all of our students to perform at their very best on the GRE!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

The GRE and the Ivy League

Princeton UniversityThe Graduate Record Examination, or GRE, is a test taken by students who plan to apply to graduate school. Not surprisingly, students must achieve high scores on this test if they want to be accepted into a school in the Ivy League. GRE scores earned by students in Ivy League schools differ depending on the study program, but in most study programs at Ivy League schools, students have GRE scores that rank in the 95th percentile or above.

In short, students who want to attend graduate school in the Ivy League must have a high GRE score to be considered. Discover more about the GRE and what students can do to achieve high scores that can help them get into a graduate program at an Ivy League school.

The Sections of the GRE
The GRE has three parts, including the Quantitative Reasoning, Verbal Reasoning, and Analytical Writing sections. The Verbal Reasoning section asks students to evaluate written material. This section tests students’ reading comprehension skills as well as their ability to identify words and concepts. The Quantitative Reasoning section tests students’ problem-solving skills – basic arithmetic, algebra, ratios, number properties, geometry, and data analysis problems are all included in this section of the GRE. A student’s critical thinking skills are put to the test in the Analytical Writing section. Students must create an organized written piece with plenty of evidence to support their ideas.

Scoring on the GRE
Students taking the GRE should know that there is a score assigned to each of the three sections of the test. For the Quantitative Reasoning and Verbal sections, the score range goes from 130 to 170. The score range is 0 to 6 for the Analytical Writing section of the test. Points for the Verbal and Quantitative Reasoning sections are awarded in one-point increments. The Analytical Writing section, on the other hand, is scored in half-point increments.

Study Tips for the GRE
Learning vocabulary words is an important part of the GRE prep process. Of course, it’s a good idea to practice with flashcards. Flashcards are excellent for memorizing words and their definitions. But it also helps for students to see vocabulary words used in context. This can be accomplished by reading magazines and newspapers. Also, the Internet is one of the best resources for books and articles. Seeing an unfamiliar word in context is an effective way for a student to absorb the word’s definition.

Another tip is to take several practice tests. This is an excellent way for a student to determine which skills need the most improvement. Plus, a student can gain confidence as they see progress with each set of practice test results.

In addition, students should make a point of starting to prepare as soon as possible for the GRE. Studying material for the GRE should be done in a gradual way over a period of months – it’s a good idea for a student to study daily for the GRE. Some students think of studying for the GRE as a part-time job. This helps them to incorporate GRE study time into their daily lives. Students who feel rushed or try to cram on information just days before the test are not likely to perform at their best on the GRE.

Studying With the Experts
At Veritas Prep, we offer courses that can help students prepare for the GRE. Our talented instructors have all achieved great success on the GRE, so students who study with Veritas Prep are learning test-taking strategies from individuals with hands-on experience! We provide students with both in-person and online tutoring options, making it easy for students to find the option that best fits into their busy schedule. Our instructors also offer students the encouragement they need to boost their confidence in the days before the test.

In addition to our GRE prep courses, we provide students with guidance on MBA admissions. Our professional consultants have experience working in the admissions offices at Ivy League schools, so we have inside information on what it takes to get into the Ivy League. GRE scores can improve with the help of our proven program and skillful tutors. From GRE prep to college admissions guidance, Veritas Prep can help you on the road to achieving your academic goals.

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

How Are GRE Scores Sent to Institutions?

Columbia - LowNaturally, students who are planning to take the GRE want to learn as much as possible about the test. For instance, many students are curious about the scoring system for the GRE. Also, they want to know how to send GRE scores to graduate schools. Learn the details about the scoring system on the GRE. In addition, discover how to send GRE scores to four or more graduate schools.

The Scoring System for the GRE
Before thinking about sending GRE scores to schools, students must learn the basics of the scoring system for the test. The GRE has three parts, including the Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Analytical Writing sections. Students can score from 130 to 170 points on both the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative sections of the exam. These two sections of the test are scored in one-point increments. The scoring range is zero to six for the Analytical Writing portion of the GRE. This section of the test is scored in half-point increments.

What Is On a Student’s Score Report?
The typical GRE score report displays a student’s basic information, including the person’s name, address, phone number, email address, and birth date. It also notes a student’s intended major as well as their test date. The report features the scores a student received on the three sections of the GRE. The officials who offer the GRE send scores to graduate schools about ten to 15 days after a student takes the computer-delivered test. Alternatively, students who take the paper-delivered GRE have their scores sent out to schools six weeks after the test date.

How to Send GRE Scores to Graduate Schools
Students are not responsible for physically sending GRE scores to universities. When students register to take the GRE, they can arrange to have their scores sent to up to four schools of their choice – this arrangement is covered by a student’s test fee. A student’s GRE scores are valid for five years. This is convenient for students if they want to take the GRE but aren’t settled on a definite starting date for graduate school.

The Process of Designating Score Report Recipients
Some students know exactly where they want to send their GRE scores, while others need some time to think about it. The process of designating score report recipients is different depending on how a student takes the GRE. Students who take the computer-delivered GRE must take their list of four schools with them to the test center, but students who opt for the paper-delivered GRE have to specify four graduate schools when they register for the test.

Sending Test Scores to Additional Schools
Some students who take the GRE send scores to more than four graduate schools. Of course, there is a fee for sending out additional score reports. Students can order these reports online or arrange for them by mail or fax. Additional score reports that are requested online are sent out five days after the order is received. Additional reports that are ordered via mail or fax are sent out to schools ten days after the request is made. The ability to send additional score reports is perfect for students who are interested in the programs of several different graduate schools.

Studying for the GRE
Students who take practice tests and then take action to improve in weaker subject areas are likely to perform well on the GRE. Students can also get an advantage on the GRE by allowing themselves several months to prepare. For instance, students who want to learn new vocabulary words for the Verbal Reasoning section have an easier time absorbing unfamiliar words and their definitions in a gradual way.

For the best results, take advantage of the effective GRE prep courses at Veritas Prep. All of our professional instructors achieved high scores on the GRE, so students who study with us are learning tips and strategies from tutors who have practical experience with this challenging exam.

Our instructors at Veritas Prep stand ready to help students who want to excel on the GRE. Our classes are available both online and in person to meet the needs of ambitious students. We give students the confidence they need to showcase their skills on the test. Contact Veritas Prep today and partner with the experts for the GRE!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

Getting Your GRE Scores

Letter of RecommendationMost students who plan to take the GRE have a number of questions about the exam. One of the most common questions is, “When will I receive my test scores?” Also, students want to know how to get GRE scores sent to the schools they are applying to. Other students want to find out about the sections and the scoring system on the GRE. Let’s look at the answers to these questions, along with others related to this important exam.

Test Sections and Scoring on the GRE
Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Analytical Writing are the three sections on the GRE. Questions in the Verbal Reasoning section measure a student’s skills in understanding and evaluating written material. The Quantitative Reasoning section contains geometry, algebra, arithmetic, and other basic math problems. The Analytical Writing section requires students to write an issue essay as well as an argument essay. These essays reveal a student’s critical thinking skills and ability to write in a clear, organized way.

Students can score from 130 to 170 points on the Verbal and Quantitative Reasoning sections. Scores for both of these sections are in one-point increments. Alternatively, students can earn from zero to six points on the Analytical Writing section of the GRE. This section is scored in half-point increments.

Getting GRE Scores
Before leaving the testing location, students who take the computer-delivered GRE have the opportunity to see their unofficial scores for the Verbal and Quantitative Reasoning sections. However, Analytical Writing scores are not available on test day – 10 to 15 days after test day, students can find out their official scores via the account they opened to register for the GRE. Alternatively, those who take the paper-delivered version of the GRE must wait six weeks before having access to their official test scores.

Students who prepare for the GRE with Veritas Prep are very likely to be happy with their test scores. Our students receive instruction from professional tutors who have taken the GRE with great success! Our instructors can offer students inside tips to help them conquer every test question. We also review practice test results with students so they can study in an efficient, logical way. At Veritas Prep, we combine first-rate instruction with excellent study resources to give our students the tools they need to get GRE scores they can be proud of.

Sending GRE Scores to Schools
Students headed to graduate school know the importance of getting GRE scores to the schools they want to apply to. A student who takes the computer-delivered version of the GRE will have their scores sent out to schools approximately 10 to 15 days after the testing date. Students who take the traditional paper version of the GRE will have their test scores sent to schools about six weeks after taking the test. All students receive a notification when their test scores have been sent out to the schools on their list.

How to Get GRE Scores Sent to Additional Schools
Students who register to take the exam can get GRE scores sent to as many as four schools – this is included in the test fee. But what if a student wants to send scores to more than four schools? Students can go online to order additional score reports or arrange for them via fax or mail. There is a fee for each additional score report.

Information Displayed on a Score Report
There are several pieces of information on a student’s score report. A student’s name and other basic contact information are on the report, as well as when the person took the GRE. A student’s GRE score and percentile rank are also on their score report. Score reports sent to schools feature a student’s contact information, test date, intended focus of study, GRE scores, and percentile rank.

At Veritas Prep, we offer a variety of tutoring options for the GRE so you can be satisfied with your score. We have both online and in-person courses available so students can choose the best study option for them. Our students receive the instruction and encouragement they need to earn their best possible score on the GRE!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

GRE Results: Analyzing Your GRE Test Results

Magnifying GlassMost students put a lot of time and effort into preparing for the GRE – not surprisingly, these students are anxious to see their test results. The typical GRE score report contains a lot of information regarding a student’s performance on the GRE.

Discover what is included on a student’s GRE report and the meaning behind this information:

Basic Information Contained in GRE Test Results
A student’s basic information can be found at the top of their GRE results sheet. This includes the person’s name, address, email, phone number, partial Social Security number, birth date, and gender. Also, the report notes a student’s intended focus of study in graduate school. If a student takes the general GRE, then those scores will be on their report – if the student took a GRE subject test, then those scores will be on the report, as well.

Points Possible on the GRE
In order for students to interpret their GRE test results, they have to know the number of points possible for each section of the test. The GRE has three parts: the Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Analytical Writing sections. For the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning sections of the test, the scoring scale is 130 to 170 points. These two sections of the test are scored in one-point increments. Students can earn from zero to six points on the Analytical Writing section of the GRE. This section is scored in half-point increments.

To get the most points possible on the GRE, get help from Veritas Prep: Our students benefit from working with an experienced tutor as they prepare for this exam. We hire talented instructors who aced the GRE, so students are able to practice effective test-taking strategies with instructors who have actual experience with the test. We teach our students how to approach every question on the GRE with confidence.

Scores on a GRE Report
Students receive raw scores for the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning sections of the test. A raw score represents the number of questions that a student got right. A student’s raw score is then turned into a scaled score. Little variations in the difficulty between different editions of the test are taken into account to compute a student’s scaled scores.

As for a student’s Analytical Writing score, each essay receives two scores – one score is given by a human grader trained to evaluate essays, and the other score is given by a computer program designed to evaluate essays. The average of these two scores is the final score assigned to the essay. As a side-note, if the human grader’s score and the computer’s score are radically different, then the essay is re-scored by two human graders.

Percentile Rank
Students looking at their GRE results online will notice a section that includes percentile ranks. Percentiles compare a student’s performance with others who took the GRE. For instance, say a student has a percentile rank of 80 for the Verbal Reasoning portion of the test. This means that 80 percent of the individuals who took the exam scored lower on that section than that student. Students are given a percentile rank for each of the three sections of the GRE. This particular GRE result can be helpful for students who are still deciding which schools to apply to.

School Admissions and GRE Results
As students analyze their GRE results online, they should pay close attention to the requirements of the schools they want to apply to. Many universities and colleges post the average GRE scores of the students they accept, which can serve as a guide for students who want to know what type of score they have to achieve in order to be accepted into their preferred school.

Some schools also post the average GRE scores of students studying in specific programs. For instance, a student who wants to go to Harvard could research what GRE score they need to achieve in order to get into the Physics program, the Sociology program, or another program at the school.

At Veritas Prep, we provide valuable instruction that helps students obtain their best possible GRE results. We combine skillful teaching with invaluable resources to give our students every advantage on the test. Our online GRE prep courses are perfect for busy undergraduate students or individuals with full-time careers. Contact our offices today!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

What is Considered a “Good” GRE Score and How is it Achieved?

GMATWhat is considered to be a “good” GRE score? This is a common question that often comes to mind for students who are planning to take the GRE. Most of them want an idea as to what scores they will need to have in order to gain admission to their preferred graduate schools. Furthermore, students also want to know the best way they can work to achieve this good GRE score.

At Veritas Prep, we know that thorough preparation is the only way to truly master the GRE, and Veritas Prep students benefit when they study with instructors who have achieved great success on this test. What is a good GRE score? Veritas Prep has the answer.

What is Considered a Good GRE Score?
Students who take the Revised GRE exam receive a report that displays their scores and other information – there are three scores on this report instead of just one, as students receive separate scores for their performance on the Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative, and Analytical Writing Sections of the test. They can score between 130 and 170 points on the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Sections, and anywhere from 0 to 6 points on the Analytical Writing Section.

Scores for the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Sections are measured in one-point increments while Analytical Writing scores accumulate in half-point increments. Therefore, a score of about 160 is considered to be good for the Verbal Reasoning Section, a score of around 164 is good for the Quantitative Section, and a score of 5 is good for the the Analytical Writing Section.

Students can also look at the specific admissions requirements of the schools they are considering. The question then becomes, “What is a good GRE score for incoming graduate students at a particular university?” This answer will vary from school to school, so it is best to research the average GRE scores of the schools you are applying to so you can have a target score in mind.

Also, keep in mind that the old version of the GRE used a different scoring scale for the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative sections of the exam (students began taking the revised GRE on August 1, 2011). The scores for both the old and the revised versions of the GRE are valid for five years after a student takes the test.

GRE Practice Tests
During GRE prep courses at Veritas Prep, we examine the results of a student’s practice tests, and these results help us to determine where a student needs to improve. Our professional instructors are experts at providing tips to students on how they can strengthen various skills for the GRE. Taking practice tests can help students gauge their progress as they improve in their performance on all three sections of the exam – in a way, a practice test also serves as a sneak preview of what a student will see on test day.

Learn Effective Strategies to Use on the GRE
Students who work with Veritas Prep instructors learn simple test-taking strategies that can end up being their most valuable resources on test day. For instance, they learn how to simplify complicated math equations on the Quantitative Section, how to eliminate answer options to narrow their choices and solve problems with efficiency, and what to look for as they read passages in the Verbal Reasoning Section.

A student who practices these strategies will be able to move through the test and complete all of their questions without running out of time. We also show students how to plan out an organized essay for the Analytical Writing Section of the exam (taking the time to create an outline will pay off in building a convincing argument).

Building Confidence While Preparing for the Test
One of the most important things we do at Veritas Prep is offer encouragement to our students. We know that taking the GRE in preparation for graduate school can be stressful, and we’ve found that most students tend to favor one section of the GRE over another simply because they are more comfortable with the subject matter. We partner with students to improve their performance in weak areas and push them to greater success in the areas in which they already excel.

Students who want to achieve great GRE scores can contact us or consult our FAQ page for more information about our services. We are the experts when it comes to giving students the guidance and strategies they need to perform at their best on the GRE.

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!