The GRE Exam for Law School?

Law School ImagesHarvard Law is the oldest continually-operating law school in the United States. It is consistently ranked as one of the top law schools in the world, and is also the largest law school in the U.S., with about as many students as Yale, Stanford and Chicago combined. So when Harvard Law makes news other law schools are likely to follow.

And Harvard Law recently announced some big news: starting next fall the GRE exam will be accepted as an alternative to the LSAT exam. Surveys suggest that nearly half of all law schools were not opposed to accepting GRE exam scores even before Harvard made its announcement, so this is probably just the beginning of a trend.

The upshot of all of this is that beginning next fall those prospective law students applying to Harvard Law can submit a GRE score instead of, or in addition to, an LSAT score. The University of Arizona Law School has already begun accepting the GRE score from applicants, and if the results from those law schools are as positive as expected, then additional law schools will likely join them in the very near future.

LSAT vs. GRE

I have taught the LSAT and currently teach the GRE and (as well as the GMAT), and have earned a perfect 170/170 on the GRE and a near-perfect 176 on the LSAT. Here are my thoughts on the LSAT versus the GRE:

The LSAT has long been the dreaded gatekeeper to law school admissions and the exam definitely rewards a certain type of test taker with a certain background. So, should you consider taking the GRE instead of the LSAT? Maybe you should!

First, who does not benefit from this development? Those who plan on applying exclusively to law school in the next couple of years should stick with the LSAT to have the most flexibility in the application process. As Harvard and Arizona are currently the only law schools that accept GRE scores from applicants, you’ll want to have a good LSAT score under your belt in case you decide to apply to any other JD programs.

Everyone else should at least consider the GRE. The Dean of Harvard Law School, Martha Minow, listed a few of the groups of students who might benefit from being able to use the GRE instead of the LSAT: “international students, multidisciplinary scholars, and joint-degree students…” I would add to that list students who have strong math skills, who have different possible career paths, or who have less time to devote to the process of preparing for an exam.

Advantages of Taking the GRE

Flexibility: The GRE is accepted for admission to nearly all graduate and business schools in addition to Harvard Law School and Arizona Law School (and hopefully a growing list of law schools). For anyone considering a variety of career options, the GRE is the best exam to take as it gives the test-taker the most flexibility. Even a great GMAT score is not accepted by law schools or graduate schools, and a perfect LSAT score will not get you into business or grad school. The GRE is the universal key that can open many doors – this is the number one reason to make the GRE your first choice.

Time Commitment: For many students, the LSAT is the exam that requires the most hours of preparation. The sheer variety of critical reasoning questions and “logic games” requires a student to master a huge range of information. On the other hand, the GRE tests skills that a student is more likely to possess already or can learn more readily through a preparation course or self-study. This is not to say that the GRE is not a challenge, it just may be a more reasonable challenge than the LSAT.

Credit for Your Strengths: Maybe you are strong in Quantitative areas… This can give you an important head start on the GRE, as math is not tested on the LSAT.

Convenience: The GRE is offered in convenient locations around the world on a continuous basis, with times generally available in the morning, afternoon and evening, making it easy to fit the GRE into your schedule. By comparison, the LSAT exam is only offered 4 times per year, usually at 8:00am. With the LSAT, you have to arrange your life around the exam, which can be difficult for test-takers with busy schedules.

Reasonable Retakes: If for any reason you do not earn the LSAT score that you hoped for, then you have to wait anywhere from two to four months before you can retake the exam. On the other hand, you can retake the GRE after just 21 days and you can take the exam 5 times in a year.

Advantages of Taking the LSAT

No Math Required: The LSAT exclusively tests skills that fall on the “Verbal” side of the GRE, meaning that you won’t have to memorize the Pythagorean Theorem, practice working with algebra, or brush up on your multiplication tables before you take it.  If you’re a student who hasn’t studied math in a while, the LSAT allows you to engage your logical thinking (philosophy, political science, literature) brain without having to dig back into high school math skills.

Applicable to All Law School Applications: While what Harvard says typically filters down to nearly all schools eventually, right now the GRE is only accepted at a few law schools.  If you plan to take the GRE to apply to Harvard and a few other elite JD programs, you’ll end up having to take the LSAT for those other applications, anyway.

Availability of Official Practice Problems: The LSAT has been administering essentially the same exam for decades, and has to retire its questions after each administration. The result? It has thousands of official exam questions to sell you for practice.  By comparison the GRE underwent an overhaul in 2011 and has some official test questions for sale, but the LSAT provides several times as much authentic practice material.

Is the GRE Easier Than the LSAT?

It is not easy to get into Harvard or any of the other top law schools. The average LSAT score for the most recent class at Harvard Law is above the 99th percentile, so an applicant’s GRE score would need to be near-perfect to be competitive.

Please understand that if you do plan to take the GRE for admission to law school, business school, or a competitive graduate school program, you will need to earn the best score that you are capable of achieving. Taking the GRE is not a short cut or an “easy way” to get into a top law school (or business school). But it is another option and – for some people – a better option.

My advice is this: Unless you are committed to applying to law school in the next couple of years, consider taking the GRE. The GRE gives you the most options (graduate school, business school, law school) and its scores are reportable for 5 years. This means that if you take the GRE this year your scores will still be good for applications submitted in 2022.

Considering taking the GRE? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions to jump start your GRE prep, or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

David Newland has scored in the 99th percentile on both the LSAT and the GMAT, and holds a perfect 170/170 score on the GRE.  He taught the LSAT for nearly ten years for a leading firm, and has taught the GRE and GMAT for Veritas Prep since 2006.  In 2008 he was named Veritas Prep’s Worldwide Instructor of the Year, and he has been a senior contributor to the Veritas Prep GRE and GMAT lesson materials. David holds a Juris Doctorate from the University of Michigan Law School and teaches live online classes from a film studio in northern Vermont.

Get Ahead of the GRE With Math Tutoring

ProfessorThe Quantitative Reasoning portion of the GRE has two sections with 20 questions in each. You are given 30 minutes to complete each of these sections. If you feel a little uncertain about this portion of the exam, getting a GRE math tutor can prove helpful in a variety of ways.

Focus on Your Weakest Skills
When you study with a GRE math tutor, you can start strengthening your weakest skills right away. Part of the Veritas Prep tutoring program involves evaluating your skills for every section of the GRE. If the results of your evaluation, or practice test, reveal that you need to sharpen your algebra skills, then your tutor will incorporate that into your customized study plan. Alternatively, if your results reveal that you are highly skilled in the area of geometry, then less time will be spent reviewing that particular topic. Following a specially-designed study plan allows you to get the most out of every tutoring session.

Learn Strategies to Solve Math Problems
Studying with an experienced GRE math tutor gives you the opportunity to learn solid strategies to use on the Quantitative Reasoning section. One valuable strategy is to draw illustrations for geometry problems instead of trying to mentally juggle all of the important elements of a question. Seeing an illustration can help you arrive at the correct answer more quickly.

You can use your scrap paper for writing the steps of algebra problems as well, so if you make a mistake, you can look at the steps to find the error. Another valuable strategy is to scan each math problem and eliminate answer options that are obviously wrong. Right away, this makes seemingly complicated math questions easier to handle.

Practice With an Experienced Instructor
When you work through practice geometry, data analysis, algebra, and arithmetic problems with a tutor, you’ll be getting the guidance you need to master each skill. For example, if you arrive at the incorrect answer to a practice algebra problem, your tutor can review each step with you to reveal where you went wrong. More importantly, your tutor can give you pointers that help you to avoid making the same mistake on similar math problems.

The tutors at Veritas Prep achieved high scores on the GRE, so when you study with us, you’re getting strategies straight from experts. Also, we take the time to match you with a tutor who is familiar with your learning style. This makes your tutoring sessions even more productive.

Get Support When Preparing for the Exam
You’re likely to have a lot of questions as you prep for the Quantitative Reasoning section of the GRE. In fact, questions may come up on a daily basis. Maybe you’ll think of one while you’re driving, sitting at work, or having lunch with a friend.

One option is to write down those questions and ask them during your next tutoring session. But if you’re preparing for the GRE with Veritas Prep, you could also email your questions to us. We provide our students with prompt answers so they can continue on the right track with their study efforts. Online support combined with quality instruction and study resources make our GRE tutoring services second to none.

Accountability Counts
Preparing with a math tutor can give you an extra element of accountability. You’ll spend a lot of time working with your tutor and studying independently for the Quantitative Reasoning section of the test. This makes you accountable to both your tutor and to yourself. You truly want to perform at your best on the exam so your efforts, as well as your tutor’s, pay off in the end.

When you make the decision to study with a tutor for the Quantitative Reasoning section, you’ll want to partner with the best. Our GRE study program provides you the advantages you need to achieve a high score on the test. Our experienced tutors understand what it takes to prepare for this exam and will be there to offer you encouragement at every step. We are so sure of the quality of our GRE tutoring courses that we back them up with a guarantee. We are invested in your success! Contact our offices to arrange for a knowledgeable GRE math tutor today.

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

Sample GRE Questions

tutoringStudents planning to take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) need to make sure they are ready when test day arrives. At Veritas Prep, we know that practice exams are valuable resources for students. Completing a set of GRE example questions serves many purposes. For one, answering GRE prep questions allows a student to see the topics that will appear on the GRE – test sample questions serve as a preview of the exam.

Today, students have the convenience of finding GRE practice questions online. Take a look at some examples:

The Verbal Reasoning Section
These GRE practice test questions include reading comprehension, sentence equivalence, and text completion question types. The reading comprehension portion of the test includes several written passages. Students answer various questions based on the information in a passage by choosing from a set of multiple choice answer options. After reading a lengthy passage, students may be asked about the theme of a passage or the intent of its author. Or, they may be asked about the implied meaning of a passage or the reasons behind a statement.

Alternatively, the sentence equivalence portion of the test asks students to choose two words that would correctly complete each sentence. For example:

Example 1: The artist known for her picturesque landscapes once commented that she ____ nature. 
A) idolizes
B) abhors
C) reveres
D) despises
E) detests
F) scorns
Answers: A, C

Example 2: A student who tries to cram for a biology final exam in one night will become _____ because it’s impossible to learn an entire course in so little time. 
A) exacerbated
B) inspired
C) exasperated
D) lethargic
E) complaisant
F) dispassionate
Answers: C, D

The text completion questions feature a passage consisting of four or five sentences. There may be one or several blank spaces in the passage. Students have a choice of three or more options for each blank. If a student is not sure about the definition of a word, sometimes looking at a word’s prefix can offer clues. Our professional instructors provide tips to students who need help on this or any other section of the GRE.

Example: The horse and rider emerged from the woods and cantered up a hillside ______ by the moon. The horse made a sharp turn sending the rider tumbling to the ground. The rider slowly stood up, cursing under his breath. He was ______ at his lack of talent as an equestrian.
A) ill-lighted:abhorred
B) illuminated:vexed
C) darkened:appalled
D) enlightened:humiliated
E) obscured:angered
Answer: B

Looking for GRE practice questions online can be helpful when reviewing for the analogy section. In this section, students choose the pair of words that is most similar to the pair of words in the example. One of the strategies we teach our students is to determine the relationship between the words in the example to arrive at the correct answer option. For instance:

Example: ASSAUGE : SORROW 
A) counsel : exacerbate
B) withhold : appreciation
C) companionship : loneliness
D) endear : criticize
E) console : aggravate
Answer: C

The Quantitative Section
There are a variety of math questions in this section of the GRE. Practice test questions may challenge a student’s algebra, geometry, arithmetic, or data analysis skills.

Example 1: Which of these numbers is the average of the first ten even numbers?
A) 9
B) 13
C) 11
D) 16
E) 15
2+4+6+8+10+12+14+16+18+20=110/10
Answer: C

Example 2: (12/3) x (8/4) =
A) 18
B) 10
C) 8
D) 12
E) 14
Answer: C

Example 3: If 8t + 5t +2t + 4t=114, then 5t + 3= 
A) 20
B) 33
C) 25
D) 32
E) 40
Answer: B

The Analytical Writing Section
This section requires students to write both an issue and an argument essay. Students receive a prompt for both essays. A sample prompt for the issue essay may ask students whether they agree or disagree with the idea of paying high school students for perfect attendance. Alternatively, a sample prompt for the argument essay may center on the argument of legalizing medical marijuana. Regardless of what side a student takes, he or she should create a well-organized essay and a convincing argument.

We are experts at helping students prepare for the GRE. Test sample questions are easier to manage when students partner with one of our online instructors. Email or call us to find out more about our prep classes for the GRE. Our helpful team at Veritas Prep gives students the tools to succeed on the GRE!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

The Online GRE Math Study Guide: Help and Practice Tips for the GRE Math Section

books_stackedThe Graduate Record Exam (GRE) contains three parts; the Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative, and Analytical Writing sections. The Quantitative section of the GRE tests students on a variety of math skills. Many students contact our staff at Veritas Prep when they want a little help preparing for this section of the test. Our knowledgeable instructors use first-rate study resources to guide students through the process of preparing for the Quantitative, as well as the other sections on the test.

Check out this GRE math study guide for tips that can simplify questions in the Quantitative or math section:

Take Practice Exams
When it comes to GRE math practice, online exams can prove very useful to students. Taking a practice test lets a student know what types of problems to expect on the actual test, and the results of a practice test reveal what a student needs to work on. Students who have this information are better able to make efficient use of their study time. Our instructors review practice tests with students and suggest specific ways that they can improve on various skills. Our Veritas Prep instructors partner with their students to provide the best GRE math prep available!

Plugging in the Numbers
One of the easiest strategies that students can use when tackling the Quantitative section of the GRE is to approach a problem starting with the answer options. For instance, an algebra question may come in the form of an equation that asks a student to find the value of X. A student can plug each of the answer options into the equation in place of X. The number that completes the equation is the correct answer option. This strategy proves especially helpful when a student works a problem in the traditional way and finds that his or her answer is not one of the answer options.

Eliminating Answer Options
Students looking for GRE math help should endeavor to simplify each problem as much as possible. For example, after looking at a question and considering all of the multiple choice answer options, a student may notice that one or two of the answer options are obviously incorrect. The student can cross out or eliminate these answer options. This leaves the student with fewer options to consider and makes the problem more manageable. This test-taking technique can also be used on multiple choice questions in the Verbal Reasoning section of the GRE.

Getting Into the Habit of Using Scrap Paper
Students should get into the habit of writing out all of the steps of a math problem on a sheet of scrap paper. This is one of those GRE math tips that many students are aware of, but decide not to put into practice; however, this tip can save a student a lot of time if there is a mistake somewhere in a problem. If a student’s answer is not displayed in the list of answer options, he or she can refer to the scrap paper and review the various steps of the problem. In addition, students should use scrap paper for drawing shapes referred to in a math question. Seeing a shape can sometimes prompt a student to figure out an answer more quickly than trying to visualize the shape.

Reviewing High School Math Problems
For students who want more GRE math practice, online exercises for high school students are an option. Many of the geometry and algebra skills tested in the Quantitative section are skills students learned in high school.

In addition to going online to complete practice math questions, a student can look in traditional math textbooks designed for high school students. This sort of prep helps students become familiar with working the steps of an algebra equation or successfully completing a geometry problem. Our professional instructors offer guidance and encouragement to students as they work their way through practice problems. We provide students with individualized help, so they can see great improvement as test day approaches.

Finally, students interested in learning the details about our services can look at our FAQ page to find helpful answers. We offer online courses that are convenient for individuals with busy school or work schedules. Veritas Prep has the best GRE math prep courses for students who want to enjoy success on the GRE!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

GRE Data Interpretation Prep Tips

books_stackedOne of the three parts of the GRE is the Quantitative Reasoning section. This section includes questions that involve geometry, algebra, and basic arithmetic. It also challenges students with questions on data interpretation. GRE test-takers must examine a collection of data in order to answer these questions. Find out more about the data interpretation questions on the GRE here and learn some helpful tips on how to arrive at the correct answers. With our help, you can do your best on the test!

Data Interpretation Questions on the GRE
On the GRE, data interpretation problems feature many types of graphs, charts, diagrams, and tables. There are several questions that accompany each visual expression of data. The questions then delve into the different types of data revealed in the illustration. These math problems measure a student’s ability to understand and interpret the information shown on a graph or chart. Not surprisingly, students who are familiar with many types of graphs and charts are likely to perform well on these questions.

Tips for Answering GRE Data Interpretation Questions
One helpful tip to use when solving data interpretation problems is to take 30 seconds or so to review the information in the graph, chart, table, or diagram. Be on the lookout for measurements, amounts, units, or other labels that can help in the process of interpreting the data. Also, look at what is being calculated – one graph may use percentages to convey data, while another uses dollar figures. This brief review of the details on a graph or chart can help guide a student as they begin to consider the questions that follow.

Another tip is to estimate the numbers found in a chart or diagram in order to arrive at the correct answer. In some cases, amounts and other statistics may not be conveyed in round numbers – coming up with an estimate can lead a student to the correct answer. Eliminating answer options that are obviously wrong is another useful tip for students. This can be done after a student mentally predicts the answer. Narrowing down the number of possible answers can make GRE interpretation questions seem more manageable.

After choosing an answer, it’s a good idea for a student to think about whether the answer fits logically with the data that has been presented. If not, a student may want to mark the question and return to it later on in the test. Spending too much time on one puzzling question can prevent students from finishing the Quantitative Reasoning section in the allotted amount of time. Plus, it can help to take a few minutes to think about a question before approaching it for the second time.

Studying for the Data Interpretation Questions on the GRE
Completing a set of practice math problems is the best way to prep for the data interpretation questions in the Quantitative Reasoning section. A practice test gives students the opportunity to sample the types of data interpretation questions that they will encounter on the actual test. Also, the results of a practice test allow students to see where they need to improve.

Becoming familiar with different types of graphs, diagrams, and charts is another way to prepare for data interpretation questions on the GRE. GRE interpretation questions may contain bar graphs, line graphs, box plots, scatter plots, and circle graphs along with others. Having knowledge of these figures will give a student the tools they need to interpret any set of data, regardless of how it’s presented.

At Veritas Prep, we provide expert tutoring to students who are preparing for the GRE. Our professional instructors have all earned high scores on the exam, which means they are uniquely qualified to help students prepare for the test. We offer online and in-person courses with which students can get the tools they need to ace data interpretation questions. Our instructors are there to answer students’ questions and give them some encouragement along the way.

We are proud to guide students toward their best scores on questions that involve data interpretation. GRE test-takers can rely on our tutoring services to assist them in preparing for these questions, along with all of the others on the exam. At Veritas Prep, we combine superb tutoring with excellent study resources to provide students with top-quality GRE preparation. Contact our offices today!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

GRE Physics Prep Solutions and Study Guide

GoalsThe GRE physics subject test is for students who plan to study this subject in graduate school. The results of this test can help graduate school officials determine a student’s course of study in the area of physics. GRE prep is necessary when students want to showcase their full range of knowledge on this subject. Look at the material on the GRE physics test and find out how to prep for it.

What Is On the GRE Physics Test?
The GRE physics subject test has 100 questions. Each of those questions has five answer options to choose from. Students encounter many different topics on the exam. Questions on classical mechanics make up 20 percent of the test – dynamics of systems of particles, three-dimensional particle dynamics, Newton’s laws, and kinematics are just a few of the topics that relate to classical mechanics.

Other topics on the physics test include electromagnetism, optics and wave phenomena, thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, atomic physics, special relativity, and laboratory methods. Nine percent of the test is devoted to specialized topics such as nuclear and particle physics, condensed matter, astrophysics, and computer applications.

Math on the GRE Physics Test
As a student studies for the test in physics, GRE prep should include a review of mathematical methods used in physics. Some of the questions on the test require students to know how to apply these methods. Coordinate systems, partial differential equations, boundary value problems, and multivariate calculus are a few examples of math topics that students should be familiar with for the test.

The Scoring System for the Physics Test
Before starting to follow any physics GRE study guide, students must be familiar with the scoring system for the test, as it is different from the system for the general GRE. Students can score between 200 and 990 points on the GRE physics test – the test is scored in ten-point increments. A score report displays a student’s test score as well as the person’s percentile ranking. Students’ scores are valid for five years from the year they take the test.

GRE Physics Preparation Tips
For students taking the GRE, physics preparation should begin with a practice test. The results of the practice test will give students an indication of what skills they need to work on. Plus, taking a timed practice test allows students to set a reasonable pace that allows them to finish the entire test in the allotted 170 minutes.

It’s also a good idea for students to review the material they learned in physics courses in undergraduate school. This includes textbooks, course notes, and assignments. As students move through a physics GRE study guide, they should remember that test questions are based on material learned in undergraduate physics classes. Students who set aside several months for GRE physics preparation are giving themselves an advantage – they are able to study in a way that allows them to fully absorb the necessary material.

Achieving Success on the GRE Physics Test
Students gain an advantage on the GRE physics test when they tackle the easiest questions first. This helps to build their confidence as they go back to work on the more puzzling test questions. Plus, this tactic prevents students from wasting a lot of valuable time on a single challenging problem.

Eliminating answers that are obviously wrong is another simple thing students can do as they work through the test. Narrowing the number of answer choices makes the process of finding the correct option a little bit easier. Working out problems on a piece of scratch paper can also be helpful to students as they move through the physics test. Sometimes, the correct answer seems more apparent when a student sees all of the work in front of them.

At Veritas Prep, we provide effective GRE tutoring services. Students have the opportunity to work with tutors who have achieved great success on the GRE. Consequently, students can get the inside track on what they need to know about the test. We help students who are looking for physics GRE solutions! We are also experts at preparing students for the GRE via our online and in-person courses, and we teach students strategies that they can use on every test question. For students who are studying physics, GRE solutions are readily available at Veritas Prep!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

Important GRE Math Formulas to Know Going Into the Exam

Pi to the 36th digitThe Quantitative Reasoning section is just one of three parts of the GRE. In this section, students must answer algebra, arithmetic, geometry, and data analysis questions. In order to prep for this section of the test, students must take time to learn some GRE math formulas, as these formulas aren’t provided on the test. Check out some examples of math formulas for GRE questions and get some tips on how to master this section of the exam.

Examples of GRE Math Formulas

  • Slope-intercept: y = mx + b
  • Distance = Rate * Time or D = RT
  • Average Speed = Total Distance/Total Time
  • For squares: Perimeter = 4s (side); Area = s2
  • For rectangles: Area = Length * Width or A= lw; Perimeter= 2l + 2w
  • For polygons: Total degrees = 180(n-2), where n = the number of sides
  • For circles: Area = πr2 , Circumference = 2πr

Tips for the Quantitative Section
As a student works through this portion of the test, it’s helpful to scan through the answer options and eliminate those that are clearly incorrect. Crossing out these options helps to make a math problem more manageable for a student. Plus, the student doesn’t have to waste time considering answer options that are definitely not going to work.

A second tip is to work problems out on scrap paper. This is especially beneficial when working on word problems – a student is able to see all of the parts of a problem without having to mentally juggle a lot of figures. Furthermore, if a student arrives at an answer that doesn’t match up with any of the options, they can go back to the work on the scrap paper to find the mistake.

Students may want to get into the habit of estimating the answer before considering any of the answer options. This gives the student a rough idea of what the answer looks like before choosing the official solution from the multiple options.

In order to save test time, it’s also a good idea for students to skip extremely puzzling questions and return to them later on in the test period. A student who spends too much time on one problem in the quantitative reasoning section is likely to run out of time before finishing the rest of the section. Students who take the computer-delivered version of the GRE are able to use a convenient “mark and review” tool that helps them to remember the questions that were skipped and go back to them.

Studying for the Quantitative Section
Memorizing math formulas for GRE questions is just one of the effective ways to study for the GRE. Working on practice math problems is another way to prep for the test. This gives a student the opportunity to practice using those math formulas. As they work through a variety of problems, students can become familiar with when to use a particular GRE math formula.

Some students find it helpful to make flash cards with math formulas on them. They can quiz themselves by holding up a flash card with a GRE math formula on it. Next, the student should successfully complete a problem using that formula.

Online math games are another study tool used by many students. Games can be a fun way for students to refresh their algebra skills or get reacquainted with the rules of geometry. Some students like to pair with another person to play these types of math games. Competing with a friend to see who can score more points and end up with more correct answers can be motivating to many students who plan to take the GRE. Plus, it’s always helpful to hear encouraging words from a friend.

All of our GRE instructors at Veritas Prep have taken the exam and achieved impressive scores. They are familiar with the subtleties of this challenging test. In short, our students learn from instructors who know what it takes to master the Quantitative Reasoning section as well as the other sections on the GRE. Our instructors help students to learn the math formulas they need to know to take on the test with confidence. We offer in-person and online courses in which students can get test-taking strategies from the experts. Contact Veritas Prep today!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!