25 Questions You Need to Ask on a College Visit

campus tourAs you prepare to make college visits, it’s likely you’re curious about the “right” questions to ask. It’s great to go into each of your visits prepared with questions so you walk away with as much information as possible.

Before you step foot on campus, we encourage you to do some research online. Ideally, the questions you ask on your visit should be questions you couldn’t easily find answers to online (think school size and available majors). We also suggest bringing a notebook to keep track of everything you learn — you’ll quickly see that just a few hours on campus will leave you with tons of new information, and it’s wise to capture it all in one place before you go! Use our guide below to prepare questions for each of the colleges on your list!

Campus Life

  1. Where do most students live?
  2. What are the dorms like? Suite-style? Community-style?
  3. What resources are available to first-year students?
  4. Do most students have cars, or are there other ways to get to on-campus and off-campus amenities?
  5. What clubs and student organizations are most popular?
  6. How easy is it to start my own club or student organization?
  7. How prominent is greek life?

Academics

  1. What is the average class size?
  2. Are lectures taught by professors or teaching assistants?
  3. Are professors available outside of class hours? How beneficial are office hours?
  4. What academic departments have the strongest reputations?
  5. What percentage of students graduate within 4 years?
  6. What opportunities are there to study abroad?
  7. Are there research opportunities for students? When can a student get involved in research?
  8. How often do students meet with academic advisors?
  9. Is it hard to change majors?

Student Resources

  1. Where do students tend to study?
  2. Are computer labs available to all students?
  3. If I struggle in a course, are there tutoring resources available?
  4. What kinds of therapy services are available to students? How can they access them?
  5. Where is the nearest medical facility? Is it hard for students to make appointments with medical professionals?
  6. What resources are available to help students find internships and jobs after graduation?
  7. What percentage of students have a full-time job after graduation?
  8. Do employers recruit on campus? How frequently?
  9. How active is your alumni network in recruiting graduates?

Hopefully the answers to these questions that your school guide provides you with should give you a good sense of whether that school is a right fit for you and your unique needs.

Have other questions about college or the college application process? We’d love to answer them for you! Give us a call at 800.925.7737 to speak with a friendly college admissions expert today.

Live Chat Event Helps You Find the Right College Match

collegeweeklive-1Deciding which college to attend can seem like an overwhelming decision. How do you know what type of school is best for you? Which are the best degree programs? And once you decide on a school, what will it take to get in?

There’s now a website – CollegeWeekLive.com – where these questions can be answered in live chats with colleges and education experts. Nearly one million high school students a year visit CollegeWeekLive.com to text and video chat with admissions counselors at colleges and universities around the country.

Throughout the year, you can watch live presentations or join a one-on-one or group chat to ask anything you’d like about topics like classes, professors, degree programs, campus life, dorm rooms, and more. Many of the participating colleges also have live chats hosted by some of their current students who can give you plenty of insider advice about what it’s really like to live on campus.

Get Free Advice at Back to School Day
The next big event is their Back to School Day on Thursday, August 25, 2016. You and your parents can sign-up for free and login between 2:00-10:00PM EDT to:

  • Chat with representatives from 100+ colleges and universities around the country
  • Attend live presentations and Q&As with education experts
  • Enter to win a $1,000 scholarship when you research colleges during the event

Top Questions to Help You Find the Right College
Don’t be shy about asking questions during a virtual college fair. This is your chance to really get to know each school! Here are some great questions to get you started:

  • What do students seem to like best about your school?
  • What do you feel makes your school stand out?
  • What’s your favorite part of campus?
  • What fun things are there to do off campus?
  • What types of students tend to do best at your school?
  • What percentage of students get a job in their field right after graduation?
  • What test scores do I need to get admitted?
  • What advice do you have for making my application stand out?
  • What are some of your most popular degree programs?
  • Which are some of your strongest programs and why?
  • How accessible are your professors?
  • What types of scholarships are available?
  • What kind of work/study opportunities do you offer?
  • What is student housing like?

Get Advice from Admissions Experts
Education experts such as Ted Fiske of The Fiske Guide to Colleges participate in many of CollegeWeekLive’s online presentations. You can watch live presentations and ask questions during the live events, or even view the presentations on-demand.

Common presentation topics include:

  • How to write a great college essay
  • Tips on researching colleges
  • The ins and outs of college admissions
  • Finding the best scholarships
  • Preparing for the ACTs and SATs

Check out the schedule of virtual college fairs and live chats and signup for CollegeWeekLive for free.

collegeweeklive

The Most Overlooked Question You Should Be Asking During Your College Search Process

Swarthmore CollegeColleges, like all other organizations, love to market themselves positively. Their brochures are bright and shiny, filled with impressive statistics, pictures of happy students, and never-ending lists of reasons why they are great. Talk to students, too, and they’re likely to gush about how much they love their schools and how happy they are to be there.

For the most part, these things are true – many colleges have lots of great things about them, and many students are really happy where they are going to school. But for someone doing the college search process and trying to determine which school is the best fit for him or her, this uniform positivity can be a bit unhelpful.

As any rational person will say, no place is perfect, and hence no college is perfect. Every school has at least a few minor issues, and in my opinion, knowing what the negative aspects of a school are is almost as important as knowing what the positive aspects of a school are. This way, a student can make a decision on which school to attend based on a comprehensive understanding of the school, not just a one-sided view of it.

So, one really important question to ask students and staff when considering a school is, “What are some things you don’t like about this school?” Or, in other words, W”hat would you change about your school if you could?”

This might not be the question that you want to ask, or even one that you feel comfortable asking, but it is of utmost importance. You will spend 4 years at the college of your choice, and that time will be a rollercoaster ride of ups and downs. The best way to make sure you’ll be prepared to handle those “downs” is if you have an idea beforehand of what kinds of “downs” they might be.

For example, a school might seem great to you on its website, yet still have a student body culture you don’t like or a greatly underfunded department you thought you wanted to major in. Maybe the walks between classes are really long, or the food options on campus are boring. Maybe the student body differs too greatly from you politically, or the professors care more about research than teaching.

Information like this is hard to find out on your own; finding it requires talking to people who actually live at the school and are willing to offer their honest perspective. Admitting that a school has flaws doesn’t mean you shouldn’t attend the school – it just means that you should choose a school with negative aspects that you are comfortable with and prepared to manage. Whether the issues are big or small, you’ll be a more informed college search-er if you take the time to figure out both the positive and negative parts of a school.

Do you still need to help with your college applications? We can help! Visit our College Admissions website and fill out our FREE Profile Evaluation for personalized feedback on your unique background! And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+, and Twitter!

By Aidan Calvelli.