How to Successfully Ask for an MBA Admissions Deferral

AdmissionA deferral is when an applicant is admitted to an MBA program they plan to attend but they desire to delay their matriculation to a later date due to some sort of extenuating circumstance. (This is different than the official deferred enrollment programs that are offered at some schools, such as the HBS 2+2 Program, which you can read about here.)

A big part of applying to business school is affirming why right now is the ideal time for you to pursue your MBA, so when a candidate asks for a deferral, it kind of flies in the face of that statement. As such, deferrals are often difficult to secure at most top MBA programs.

Generally, when deferrals are secured at top schools, it is due to personal illnesses, deaths or illnesses in the family, or military deployment – essentially, extreme circumstances that are outside of the control of the admit. Financial or work related deferrals are more commonly requested, but they are also less commonly approved. If you feel that you really need a deferral for one of these reasons by all means request one, just know the odds of the deferral being granted will not be in your favor.

If you are going to make the request to have your business school admission deferred, see if you can have a conversation about your situation with the Admissions Committee in-person, or at least on the phone, rather than over email. This will add a personal element to your request and increase the chance that the Admissions Committee will make their decision in your favor.

It also helps if you can position the reason for your deferral as a once in a life time opportunity while reaffirming your commitment to pursuing an MBA at that particular school the following year, and reminding the Admissions Committee of how you will be able to offer more to the student community upon your eventual matriculation. Remember this is a difficult decision for the Admissions Committee as well. If the school admitted you, then they are invested in you becoming a part of their community, so engaging in discussions around a deferral is equally challenging for the Admissions Committee.

Make sure to follow up your conversation with the Admissions Committee via email, and include a special thank you for their consideration as well as a reminder of the above notes, as this request is ultimately outside of the typical application process. The best thing you can do when engaging in the process of requesting an MBA deferral is to be humble. Remember, you are making a BIG request that the school does not need to grant you. Being humble and appreciative of the consideration you are receiving can only help your chances.

It is important to enter this process understanding the limited odds you have to actually secure a deferral, so follow the tips above to increase your chances, and make sure you are properly evaluating whether the alternative to matriculating in the year you applied is worth the overall hassle.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter.

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants. You can read more articles by him here.

4 Things to NOT Do When Waiting On an MBA Admissions Decision

08fba0fOne of the most nerve-racking times for MBA applicants is not before they submit their applications, but rather, is while they are waiting to hear back from their dream schools after they have sent in their application components.

In fact, I firmly believe that more strange activity and anxiety manifests during the two months applicants spend waiting on their admissions decisions than during any other time of MBA application process. With this in mind, it is important to maintain your composure AND your sanity when handling your post-submission moves.

Let’s explore a few things to avoid while you are waiting to receive your MBA admissions decision:

1) Read Message Boards:
Online message boards and forums are often a good source of information from other like-minded individuals experiencing similar situations to yours during the application process. On the negative side, however, message boards can also encourage and exacerbate a fair amount of anxiety when it comes to waiting for your official admissions decision. Sometimes message boards become bastions for fear mongering and misinformation, and when coupled with the stress of the application process, this can manifest into some really irrational thoughts and behavior. I highly recommend avoiding these boards if possible while you are waiting on an admissions decision, especially around decision days when programs release their application decisions.

2) Unnecessarily Contact the Program:
MBA admissions committees evaluate all touchpoints they have with a candidate. So just because your application has been submitted does not mean the non-application evaluation period is over. Avoid the temptation to call into the admissions offices of the business schools you have applied to asking questions about decision timelines or other publicly-available information.

Keep in mind, MBA admissions officers receive tons of outreach from candidates all over the world, so although you think your question is unique and necessary, more than likely it is not. Use your discretion here when deciding whether to reach out or send additional information to schools, but keep in mind that a major part of being a good business person is judgment – make sure you use good judgement in deciding whether or not that outreach is truly necessary .

3) Slack Off at Work:
For many business school applicants, it is easy to slack off on day-to-day work activities during MBA application season and divert all of one’s energy to crafting the perfect application, but anything can happen once an MBA application is submitted. Once you send your application to your schools of choice, it is a great time to double down on tasks in the office. Also, if you are not admitted to your school of choice, you may need to stay at your company longer than expected, in which case, you will want to continue to position yourself for success in your current role (especially if you plan to reapply to business school in future application cycles).

4) Get Into Trouble:
This probably goes without saying, but keep yourself out of trouble while you are waiting for you MBA admissions decision to arrive. Post-application-submission is not the time to completely let loose. Keep your social media account clear (and private) and avoid any other problematic activity – it would be a shame to lose an admission to your dream school based on poor post-submission behavior.

Remember, maintain your composure and positive behavior during that dreaded post-submission waiting period to avoid compromising a potential admission.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter.

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants. You can read more articles by him here.

How to Make Your Admissions Decision With Uneven Information

AdmissionReceiving multiple offers of admission to various business schools after a long application season is a great feeling for most candidates, but the hard part is not quite done yet – now it is time to make a final decision.

For some, this decision-making process will be fairly simple – many candidates prioritize their list of schools well in advance of submitting their applications, so it is easy for them to choose which one they want to attend when they finally hear back from the Admissions Committees. However, in many other situations, all offers are not created equal, so selecting one school from another can often become very complicated. So, where should candidates start with so much uneven information from programs?

Here are a few tips to keep in mind as you choose between multiple business school admissions offers:

Prestige:
Is there a distinction between the programs you are considering? Evaluating your decision between a program with a global reputation like Harvard Business School and a smaller regional program would be an uneven comparison. Generally, the more reputable programs will offer better long term career considerations due to their prestigious names and large alumni base.

Location:
Where do you want to live post-MBA? The location of your MBA program plays a huge role in determining the likelihood of where your future job offers will come from. It is always recommended to attend a program in close proximity to your target post-MBA location, whether that is regionally, nationally, or internationally. Reputation can also certainly can factor in here, as the more well-known programs often offer a broader reach of opportunities that can make location preference moot.

Career Opportunities:
Which program better equips you to reach your career goals? Really look at this question holistically – reviewing your target program’s employment report is a great place to start. Look at both the aggregate number of students that have pursued the particular industry you want to be involved in, as well as the percentage. You should also consider are the reputation of the program in this particular industry. For example, Kellogg has a great finance program, but generally does not have a major reputation in the finance industry and with finance practitioners; if finance is your focus and you are choosing between other programs that possess a better reputation in that unique sphere, this would be something to keep in mind.

Financial:
This is business school after all, so the financial aspect of this decision will probably be a major component for you, even if you are one of the lucky recipients of scholarships. Now, money tends to complicate what may be an otherwise clear decision for many candidates, so build out a few scenarios that will aid in this aspect of your decision-making process. The toughest choices occur between programs that better address the above criteria but provide more limited scholarship money with those that provide more scholarship money but less of the desired attributes. In these situations, it is important to balance out all of your options to make the most holistic decision for you and your family.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants. You can read more articles by him here.

How I Chose Berkeley

UC BerkeleyToday we feature a guest post from Veritas Prep SAT instructor Courtney Tran. Courtney is a student at UC Berkeley, studying Political Economy and Rhetoric. In high school, she was named a National Merit Finalist and National AP Scholar, and she represented her district two years in a row in Public Forum Debate at the National Forensics League National Tournament. She was always active in local politics, including speaking against budget cuts in and closings of Oakland Public Libraries.

When I received my acceptance email from the University of California at Berkeley in February of last year, I didn’t even finish reading the letter before closing it and resuming my Tetris game.  I was happy to have been accepted, but I had never seriously considered attending Cal; I had already fallen head over heels for the University of Southern California.  After all, I had lived in the Bay Area for more than a decade.  I was ready for a change of scene.

A couple of high scores later, I reopened and skimmed the letter, which noted that I had been invited to a scholarship interview.  I attended later that month, figuring that I had no excuse for skipping out on a prestigious scholarship opportunity within jogging distance of my mother’s apartment.  A few weeks later, however, I received notice that I had been awarded several scholarships that would enable me to attend Cal nearly free of charge.

Grudgingly, I accepted.  In April, when some calculator-crunching of the financial aid packages from my college acceptance letters revealed that Berkeley was by far the most financially sensible of my options, I even more grudgingly submitted my deposit to the University of California.  Don’t get me wrong—I was and still am extremely grateful for the generous financial support I received for my education. But I had grown up waiting for a chance to see what the world looked like beyond the Bay Area, and attending Cal felt like taking the easy road instead of following my dreams.

I moved into my dorm room a few short months later, lugging four duffel bags and outlining transfer application essays in my head.  Despite my reluctance, I couldn’t help but be impressed by the diversity of my class and the enormous range of classes and activities available.  Bit by bit, the school grew on me: the beautiful North Side architecture, the surprisingly tasty dining hall food (who knew?), and my peers’ enthusiasm for learning. I was delighted by the fact that, for the first time in my life, school was fast-paced and challenging: memorizing wasn’t enough anymore, and I often had to study late into the night in order to keep up with my classmates.

Before I knew it, I woke up every day excited to go to class.  My dorm-mates became my second family, the exposure to new cultures and types of people broadened my perspectives, and I slowly grew to appreciate the convenience and comfort of living close to home.  Even better, Cal’s alumni network and internship programs fed my interests in travel, politics, languages, and the field of public policy by helping me secure two winter break externships—one in Washington D.C., and one in San Jose—and a place in a summer program that will allow me to intern in the state capital for eight weeks.  I got my wish after all.

It’s January now. I’ve just finished my first semester as a Golden Bear, as well as a few applications for study abroad programs. New classes start in two weeks. I’m writing this from beneath a bundle of fuzzy blankets on the couch in my mother’s apartment; and as comfy as it is here, I can’t wait to go back to school. I never did submit those transfer essays, because it didn’t take me long to realize that UC Berkeley, despite my initial reservations, was the perfect place for me. I wear my Golden Bear hoodie with pride.

Do you need more help with your college applications? Visit our College Admissions website and fill out our FREE Profile Evaluation for personalized feedback on your unique background! And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+, and Twitter!