The GRE Exam for Law School?

Law School Images

Update: On August 7, 2017, Northwestern University’s Pritzker School of Law and Georgetown Law also announced that they will begin accepting the GRE or the LSAT for admissions. With this news, it seems all the more inevitable that the GRE will soon be universally accepted among top law schools. Read on…”

Harvard Law is the oldest continually-operating law school in the United States. It is consistently ranked as one of the top law schools in the world, and is also the largest law school in the U.S., with about as many students as Yale, Stanford and Chicago combined. So when Harvard Law makes news other law schools are likely to follow.

And Harvard Law recently announced some big news: starting next fall the GRE exam will be accepted as an alternative to the LSAT exam. Surveys suggest that nearly half of all law schools were not opposed to accepting GRE exam scores even before Harvard made its announcement, so this is probably just the beginning of a trend.

The upshot of all of this is that beginning next fall those prospective law students applying to Harvard Law can submit a GRE score instead of, or in addition to, an LSAT score. The University of Arizona Law School has already begun accepting the GRE score from applicants, and if the results from those law schools are as positive as expected, then additional law schools will likely join them in the very near future.

LSAT vs. GRE

I have taught the LSAT and currently teach the GRE and (as well as the GMAT), and have earned a perfect 170/170 on the GRE and a near-perfect 176 on the LSAT. Here are my thoughts on the LSAT versus the GRE:

The LSAT has long been the dreaded gatekeeper to law school admissions and the exam definitely rewards a certain type of test taker with a certain background. So, should you consider taking the GRE instead of the LSAT? Maybe you should!

First, who does not benefit from this development? Those who plan on applying exclusively to law school in the next couple of years should stick with the LSAT to have the most flexibility in the application process. As Harvard and Arizona are currently the only law schools that accept GRE scores from applicants, you’ll want to have a good LSAT score under your belt in case you decide to apply to any other JD programs.

Everyone else should at least consider the GRE. The Dean of Harvard Law School, Martha Minow, listed a few of the groups of students who might benefit from being able to use the GRE instead of the LSAT: “international students, multidisciplinary scholars, and joint-degree students…” I would add to that list students who have strong math skills, who have different possible career paths, or who have less time to devote to the process of preparing for an exam.

Advantages of Taking the GRE

Flexibility: The GRE is accepted for admission to nearly all graduate and business schools in addition to Harvard Law School and Arizona Law School (and hopefully a growing list of law schools). For anyone considering a variety of career options, the GRE is the best exam to take as it gives the test-taker the most flexibility. Even a great GMAT score is not accepted by law schools or graduate schools, and a perfect LSAT score will not get you into business or grad school. The GRE is the universal key that can open many doors – this is the number one reason to make the GRE your first choice.

Time Commitment: For many students, the LSAT is the exam that requires the most hours of preparation. The sheer variety of critical reasoning questions and “logic games” requires a student to master a huge range of information. On the other hand, the GRE tests skills that a student is more likely to possess already or can learn more readily through a preparation course or self-study. This is not to say that the GRE is not a challenge, it just may be a more reasonable challenge than the LSAT.

Credit for Your Strengths: Maybe you are strong in Quantitative areas… This can give you an important head start on the GRE, as math is not tested on the LSAT.

Convenience: The GRE is offered in convenient locations around the world on a continuous basis, with times generally available in the morning, afternoon and evening, making it easy to fit the GRE into your schedule. By comparison, the LSAT exam is only offered 4 times per year, usually at 8:00am. With the LSAT, you have to arrange your life around the exam, which can be difficult for test-takers with busy schedules.

Reasonable Retakes: If for any reason you do not earn the LSAT score that you hoped for, then you have to wait anywhere from two to four months before you can retake the exam. On the other hand, you can retake the GRE after just 21 days and you can take the exam 5 times in a year.

Advantages of Taking the LSAT

No Math Required: The LSAT exclusively tests skills that fall on the “Verbal” side of the GRE, meaning that you won’t have to memorize the Pythagorean Theorem, practice working with algebra, or brush up on your multiplication tables before you take it.  If you’re a student who hasn’t studied math in a while, the LSAT allows you to engage your logical thinking (philosophy, political science, literature) brain without having to dig back into high school math skills.

Applicable to All Law School Applications: While what Harvard says typically filters down to nearly all schools eventually, right now the GRE is only accepted at a few law schools.  If you plan to take the GRE to apply to Harvard and a few other elite JD programs, you’ll end up having to take the LSAT for those other applications, anyway.

Availability of Official Practice Problems: The LSAT has been administering essentially the same exam for decades, and has to retire its questions after each administration. The result? It has thousands of official exam questions to sell you for practice.  By comparison the GRE underwent an overhaul in 2011 and has some official test questions for sale, but the LSAT provides several times as much authentic practice material.

Is the GRE Easier Than the LSAT?

It is not easy to get into Harvard or any of the other top law schools. The average LSAT score for the most recent class at Harvard Law is above the 99th percentile, so an applicant’s GRE score would need to be near-perfect to be competitive.

Please understand that if you do plan to take the GRE for admission to law school, business school, or a competitive graduate school program, you will need to earn the best score that you are capable of achieving. Taking the GRE is not a short cut or an “easy way” to get into a top law school (or business school). But it is another option and – for some people – a better option.

My advice is this: Unless you are committed to applying to law school in the next couple of years, consider taking the GRE. The GRE gives you the most options (graduate school, business school, law school) and its scores are reportable for 5 years. This means that if you take the GRE this year your scores will still be good for applications submitted in 2022.

Considering taking the GRE? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions to jump start your GRE prep, or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

David Newland has scored in the 99th percentile on both the LSAT and the GMAT, and holds a perfect 170/170 score on the GRE.  He taught the LSAT for nearly ten years for a leading firm, and has taught the GRE and GMAT for Veritas Prep since 2006.  In 2008 he was named Veritas Prep’s Worldwide Instructor of the Year, and he has been a senior contributor to the Veritas Prep GRE and GMAT lesson materials. David holds a Juris Doctorate from the University of Michigan Law School and teaches live online classes from a film studio in northern Vermont.

Flag Your Way to a Better GRE Score

GoalsIn each section of the GRE, there are two important strategic considerations:

1) Each question counts the same: Getting stuck on one question burns valuable time that you could use for the remaining questions.  Maybe you eventually figure out how to solve it, but it might cost you the chance to get two (or more) right answers later on – not great!

2) Time is an asset you control: Knowing how to spend your time effectively can make a big difference in how you score. Spend time on the questions that will earn you points, and minimize time on questions that won’t.

The flagging technique is a great way to take advantage of each of these points. By using it wisely, you can maximize your chances of getting to your target score. Here are three situations where the flagging tool can be invaluable:

You’re pretty sure in your answer, but you’re not certain.
Many GRE takers enter the test well prepared, but there may be some content areas (such as ratios or exponent properties) in which they aren’t fully confident. You may spend a minute working on a problem and get to a point where you feel pretty good about your answer, but you aren’t fully sure (Quantitative comparison questions are notorious for this!). You’d love to do some more testing or double-check your work, but you also realize that it will burn more precious time than you can spare. The solution? Select your answer and flag it. Consider leaving a quick note about your current thoughts so you can pick up right where you left off. If you finish the rest of the section with time remaining, you’ll now have the chance to double-check your initial answer.

You’re not sure how to get started on a problem. 
You’ve read the question. You’ve re-read it. You’ve analyzed the answer choices. You’re still unclear on what the question is asking for, and you’re not even sure what your first steps to figuring it out should be. Hey, it happens – sometimes a question is set up in a way that doesn’t seem to fit the examples you saw during your preparation.

At this point, you have two options: continue staring at the problem and hope the numbers and variables start moving themselves around (like Zach Galifianakis playing blackjack in “The Hangover”), or flag it and move on. If you persist with the question, the best-case scenario is that you eventually figure it out and pick an answer, but you burned time that could have gotten you two or three right answers on other questions. The worst-case scenario is that you eventually give up and move on, burning time without even getting the question right. Your best strategy is to flag it, get some other right answers, and come back to it when you have time to spare.

You can solve a problem, but you know it’s going to take a while. 
“Select All That Apply” questions present this dilemma more often than do other types – the question makes sense, you know how to get started, and you are confident in your ability to find all of the correct answers. On the other hand, you have six or more possible answers, and you know the process to make sure that you find all of the correct answers (remember: no partial credit!) will be time-consuming. Early in the section, spending more than three minutes on one problem is not a wise investment of your time. If there are obvious answers, select them, flag the problem, and return when you have the time to invest.

Clearly, the flagging technique is a strong ally if you know how to use it effectively.  On your next GRE practice test, look for opportunities to flag questions that fit the three categories above. Doing so will allow you to maximize the number of questions you get right by investing your time wisely.

Getting ready to take the GRE? We have free online GRE seminars running all the time. And, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter!

By Bill Robinson, a Veritas Prep instructor based in San Diego.

3.14 Reasons to Love Pi

Pie ChartEvery March 14, numerically expressed as 3/14, math nerds and test prep instructors celebrate the time-honored tradition of “Pi Day,” deriving plenty of happiness from the fact that the date looks like the number 3.14, the approximation of π. Pi (π) is, of course, the lynchpin value in all circle calculations. The area of a circle is π(r^2), and the circumference of a circle is 2πr or πd.

As you study for a major standardized test, you know that you’ll be working with circles at some point, so here are 3.14 reasons that you should learn to love the number π:

1) Pi should make you salivate.
On any standardized test question, if you see the value π, whether in the question itself of in the answer choices, that π tells you that you’re dealing with a circle. Some test questions disguise what they want you to do – you may have to draw in a triangle to find the diagonal of a square, for example – but circle problems cannot hide from you! π is a dead giveaway that you’re dealing with a circle, so like Pavlov’s Dog, when you see that signal, π, you should respond with a biological response and conjure up all your knowledge of circles immediately.

2) Pi can be easily cut into slices.
Whether you’re dealing with a section of the area of a circle or a section of the circumference (arc length), the fact that a circle is perfectly symmetrical makes the job of cutting that circle into slices an easy one. With arc length, all you end up doing is using the central angle to determine the proportion of that section (angle/360 = proportion of what you want), making it very easy to slice up a circle using π. With the area of a section, as long as the arms of that section are equal to the radius of the circle, you can do the exact same thing. Just like an apple pie or pizza pie, if you’re cutting into slices from the center of the circle, cutting that pie into slices is a relatively simple task.

3) You can take your pi to go.
You will almost never have to calculate the value of pi on a standardized test: almost always, the symbol π will appear in the answer choices (e.g. 5π, 7π, etc.), meaning that you can just carry π through your calculations and bring it with you to the answer choices. If, for example, you need to calculate the area of a circle with radius 3, you’ll plug the radius into your formula [π(3^2)] and just end up with 9π, which you’ll find in the answer choices. With most other symbols (x, y, r, etc.) you’ll need to do some work to turn them into numbers. Pi is great because you can take it to go.

3.14) The decimals in pi are just a sliver.
If you ever are asked to “calculate” pi (which typically means that the question is asking you to approximate a value, not to directly calculate it), you can use the fact that the .14 in 3.14 is a tiny sliver of a decimal. For example, if you had to estimate a value for 5π, 5 times 3 is clearly 15, but 5 times .14 is so small that it won’t require you to go all the way to 16. So if your answer choices were 15.7, 16.1, 16.4, etc., you could rely on the fact that the decimal .14 is so small that you can eliminate all the 16s.

Other irrational numbers like the square root of 2 and square root of 3 have decimal places more in the neighborhood of .5, so you will probably need to work a little harder to estimate how they’ll react when you multiply them even by relatively small numbers. But π’s decimals come in small slivers, allowing you to manage your calculations in bite size pieces.

So remember – there are 3.14 (and counting) reasons to love pi, and learning to love pi can help turn your test day into a piece of cake.

Are you getting ready to take the SAT, ACT, GMAT or GRE? Check out our website for a variety of helpful test prep resources. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter!

By Brian Galvin.

The Best Ways to Study and Practice Vocabulary for the GRE Exam

Test PrepThe Graduate Record Examination, or GRE, contains three sections. One of those sections tests a student’s verbal reasoning skills. Within the Verbal Reasoning section, students encounter questions that ask them to identify antonyms and synonyms. Also, they must select the appropriate word or words to complete various sentences. In short, many of the questions in this section test a student’s vocabulary skills.

Fortunately, there are several ways that students can practice GRE vocab words as they prep for this important test:

Review Lists of GRE Vocabulary Words
There are many lists that reveal groups of words that are frequently seen on the GRE. Vocabulary practice can take the form of learning these high frequency words along with their definitions. It’s a good idea for students to divide a vocabulary list into groups of ten words. Learning ten words every week is a lot more effective than trying to absorb all of the words on a list in a short period of time.

The professional instructors at Veritas Prep are experts at teaching students how to learn and remember vocabulary words that may appear on the GRE. In addition, we provide strategies that narrow down and simplify the possible answers making a question in the verbal reasoning section easier for a student to tackle.

Get GRE Vocab Prep with Practice Tests
Taking a practice GRE is another way of learning vocabulary words that may appear on the actual test. Along with introducing students to the subject matter in the verbal reasoning section, they can become familiar with the types of answer options offered on the exam. A student may use mnemonic techniques to remember words on a practice test. For instance, a student who sees the word dissonance can remember it by looking at its prefix, “dis”. In Latin, “dis” means to take apart and the word “sonance” means sound. These clues can remind a student that the word dissonance means inharmonious sound. A student may not see the exact same words on the actual test, but the exam may include words that are similar to the ones on a practice test.

Use GRE Vocabulary on Assignments
The best way to study vocabulary words for the GRE is to use them in everyday life. For instance, a student who is a senior in an undergraduate program can use some GRE vocabulary words on essays and other writing assignments. Or, students who write personal blogs each day can use some newly learned vocabulary words in their articles. A student is more likely to remember a vocabulary word and its meaning if he or she uses it in context. Using these vocabulary words often keeps them fresh in a student’s memory.

Get GRE Vocab Practice with Flashcards
Making flashcards takes a little time, but they are effective study tools when learning unfamiliar vocabulary words. Create flashcards by writing a word on one side of a card and its definition on the other side. Some students prefer to create flashcards via their computer. Flashcards provide students with a convenient way to study GRE vocabulary. Practice with the flashcards while on a break at work or between classes at school.

It’s a good idea for students to quiz themselves using just ten flashcards at a time. Studying ten flashcards at a time is one way to prevent a student from feeling overwhelmed. Students may also want to enlist the help of a roommate or friend when learning new vocabulary words. Two friends who plan to take the GRE can quiz one another with flashcards.

Read Newspaper and Magazine Articles
Many of the words used in newspaper and magazine articles are the same ones found on the GRE. Vocab practice can be as easy as going online each morning to read several articles from a news magazine. When students encounter a word they learned from a GRE vocabulary list, they are able to see it used in context. This further solidifies the meaning of the word in a student’s mind.

Finally, students who want assistance expanding their vocabulary in preparation for the test can contact us regarding GRE prep courses. Our Frequently Asked Questions section is also helpful to students who want to know more about Veritas Prep’s services. We provide students with excellent learning resources and study tips that can help them to master questions on the Verbal Reasoning section as well as the rest of the GRE.

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

Get Ahead of the GRE With Math Tutoring

ProfessorThe Quantitative Reasoning portion of the GRE has two sections with 20 questions in each. You are given 30 minutes to complete each of these sections. If you feel a little uncertain about this portion of the exam, getting a GRE math tutor can prove helpful in a variety of ways.

Focus on Your Weakest Skills
When you study with a GRE math tutor, you can start strengthening your weakest skills right away. Part of the Veritas Prep tutoring program involves evaluating your skills for every section of the GRE. If the results of your evaluation, or practice test, reveal that you need to sharpen your algebra skills, then your tutor will incorporate that into your customized study plan. Alternatively, if your results reveal that you are highly skilled in the area of geometry, then less time will be spent reviewing that particular topic. Following a specially-designed study plan allows you to get the most out of every tutoring session.

Learn Strategies to Solve Math Problems
Studying with an experienced GRE math tutor gives you the opportunity to learn solid strategies to use on the Quantitative Reasoning section. One valuable strategy is to draw illustrations for geometry problems instead of trying to mentally juggle all of the important elements of a question. Seeing an illustration can help you arrive at the correct answer more quickly.

You can use your scrap paper for writing the steps of algebra problems as well, so if you make a mistake, you can look at the steps to find the error. Another valuable strategy is to scan each math problem and eliminate answer options that are obviously wrong. Right away, this makes seemingly complicated math questions easier to handle.

Practice With an Experienced Instructor
When you work through practice geometry, data analysis, algebra, and arithmetic problems with a tutor, you’ll be getting the guidance you need to master each skill. For example, if you arrive at the incorrect answer to a practice algebra problem, your tutor can review each step with you to reveal where you went wrong. More importantly, your tutor can give you pointers that help you to avoid making the same mistake on similar math problems.

The tutors at Veritas Prep achieved high scores on the GRE, so when you study with us, you’re getting strategies straight from experts. Also, we take the time to match you with a tutor who is familiar with your learning style. This makes your tutoring sessions even more productive.

Get Support When Preparing for the Exam
You’re likely to have a lot of questions as you prep for the Quantitative Reasoning section of the GRE. In fact, questions may come up on a daily basis. Maybe you’ll think of one while you’re driving, sitting at work, or having lunch with a friend.

One option is to write down those questions and ask them during your next tutoring session. But if you’re preparing for the GRE with Veritas Prep, you could also email your questions to us. We provide our students with prompt answers so they can continue on the right track with their study efforts. Online support combined with quality instruction and study resources make our GRE tutoring services second to none.

Accountability Counts
Preparing with a math tutor can give you an extra element of accountability. You’ll spend a lot of time working with your tutor and studying independently for the Quantitative Reasoning section of the test. This makes you accountable to both your tutor and to yourself. You truly want to perform at your best on the exam so your efforts, as well as your tutor’s, pay off in the end.

When you make the decision to study with a tutor for the Quantitative Reasoning section, you’ll want to partner with the best. Our GRE study program provides you the advantages you need to achieve a high score on the test. Our experienced tutors understand what it takes to prepare for this exam and will be there to offer you encouragement at every step. We are so sure of the quality of our GRE tutoring courses that we back them up with a guarantee. We are invested in your success! Contact our offices to arrange for a knowledgeable GRE math tutor today.

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

How to Start Studying for the GRE

GMAT PracticeMost students who intend to go to graduate school understand that taking the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is an important step in the process. But, many of them wonder how to start studying for the GRE. At Veritas Prep, we offer online courses that help students prepare for this critical exam. Here are some valuable tips for students as they begin the process of studying for the GRE.

Complete a Practice Exam
Students who are wondering how to start studying for the GRE can take a step in the right direction by completing a practice test. Doing this allows them to see the type of material that’s on GRE. For example, they can get a sneak preview of the types of geometry and algebra questions on the Quantitative section of the exam. Also, students have their reading comprehension and vocabulary skills tested in the Verbal Reasoning section.

The Analytical Writing section requires students to write two essays. One of them is an issue piece while the other is an argument essay. After finishing a practice GRE, students can look at the results of the test to gain insight on what skills they need to improve.

Identify Weaknesses and Strengths on the GRE
Students working with one of our Veritas Prep instructors have the advantage of reviewing the results of their practice test with an expert. A student who needs to brush up on his geometry skills can learn lots of practical tips from his instructor to make geometry questions more manageable. Alternatively, a student who needs help in the area of reading comprehension can garner strategies from her instructor that serve to simplify lengthy written passages. Practice test results are invaluable for a student who wants to make the most efficient use of his or her study time. Practice test results also reveal a student’s strengths. Understandably, this portion of the test results can give some students a much needed confidence boost!

Implement Test-Taking Strategies
Taking more than one practice test is valuable for students who sign up for the GRE. Studying tips and strategies learned at Veritas Prep can be put into practice. One test-taking strategy involves eliminating answer options. Since many of the questions on the GRE are in multiple choice form, this strategy can prove very useful on test day.

For example, there are several questions in the Verbal Reasoning section that ask students to identify the pair of words that would make the most sense if plugged into a particular sentence. A student starts by reading the sentence and then looks at all of the answer options. In many cases, a student will see a pair of words that have nothing to do with the subject matter in the sentence – this answer option can be eliminated right away. Eliminating options helps students to focus their concentration on the most valid choices.

Enhance Study Time Using Various Resources
When studying for the GRE, students can use aids to help them strengthen various skills. For instance, it’s a good idea for students to make flashcards to learn vocabulary words found in the Verbal Reasoning section of the test. A student must find lists of vocabulary words that are likely to be on the GRE. Next, he or she creates a flashcard for each unfamiliar word and its definition. Students who quiz themselves every day with five or ten flashcards are able to absorb a reasonable number of new words each week.

Newspapers and magazines are other study aids that help students to prep for the GRE. Students who get into the habit of reading newspaper and magazine articles are likely to encounter some of the vocabulary words they are learning for the GRE. Seeing these words in context is tremendously helpful to a student who is trying to remember them for the test. Geometry and algebra textbooks are other examples of useful study aids. Students can complete various exercises in the textbook to sharpen their skills in these areas.

Finally, our instructors can be invaluable to students preparing for the GRE. Studying tips, strategies, and encouragement are just three of the things that we offer to our students at Veritas Prep. We are happy to answer questions about our services and encourage students to contact our team with inquiries about our online GRE prep classes. Students who sign up with Veritas Prep are giving themselves an advantage on the GRE.

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

4 Predictions for Test Prep and Admissions in 2017

There goes another year. Seemingly no sooner than it started, 2016 has packed up and stormed off, leaving many dizzy in its wake. Now that 2017 is underway, it’s time to dust off the old Veritas Prep crystal ball and see what may be in store for 2017 in the worlds of test preparation and admissions. Odds are that we won’t be right on all of these — and we may even manage to get all four wrong — but let’s dig in and predict a few things that we expect to see in 2017:

One-year MBA programs will reach a tipping point in the United States.
For decades, one-year programs have been more popular in Europe than in the United States, although some prominent American programs, such as Kellogg, have moved to expand their one-year programs in recent years. With more and more articles appearing in the media about students and their families questioning the costs of higher education, accelerated programs will keep looking more and more appealing to applicants who don’t want to spend six figures on an MBA. The globalization of management graduate education will continue, and more American business schools will start to embrace what’s traditionally been a more Euro-flavored program type.

Video prompts will become much more common in business school applications.
Yes, we predicted this last year, and it didn’t quite come to fruition. But, schools are becoming more and more comfortable with video as a medium for learning about applicants, and — probably more importantly — applicants themselves mostly seem to be comfortable with video. In AIGAC’s 2016 MBA Applicant Survey, only 16% of applicants surveyed said that video responses were the most challenging part of the application. That’s far smaller than the percentage of applicants who said that standardized tests (61%) and written essays (46%) were the most challenging! Rotman, Yale, Kellogg, and McCombs have helped blaze a video trail that we expect others will soon follow.

An Asia-scale cheating scandal will hit the SAT or ACT in the United States.
News articles about standardized test cheating scandals like this one and this one seem to come out nearly every month. Much of the blame lies with the pressure that students — and especially their families — put on themselves to do well on these exams.

It’s also greed. For every student that will do anything to do well on an exam, there’s a person or company who’s happy to take their money and do whatever it takes to give that student a leg up. Sometimes that means legally and ethically training that student to perform to the best of their ability, but many other times it means falsifying documents or providing students with live test questions for large sums of money. This kind of greed exists everywhere in the world, and it’s only a matter of time until a similar large-scale scandal happens in the U.S.

Community colleges will gain a lot more recognition.
Did you know that more than half of students who enroll in college first do so at a community college? Most Americans don’t know that, even though community colleges have been the engine that educates millions of Americans each year. We’ll see the federal government putting more emphasis on jobs and job training in the coming year, and community colleges are perfectly positioned to serve that role. While it remains to be seen whether community colleges get all of the funding they need to keep serving their mission, we expect that, at a minimum, they’ll start to get more recognition for the job they do to train and retrain America’s workforce.

Happy New Year, everyone. We can’t wait to check back in 2018 and see how this year turned out!

By Scott Shrum

Sample GRE Questions

tutoringStudents planning to take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) need to make sure they are ready when test day arrives. At Veritas Prep, we know that practice exams are valuable resources for students. Completing a set of GRE example questions serves many purposes. For one, answering GRE prep questions allows a student to see the topics that will appear on the GRE – test sample questions serve as a preview of the exam.

Today, students have the convenience of finding GRE practice questions online. Take a look at some examples:

The Verbal Reasoning Section
These GRE practice test questions include reading comprehension, sentence equivalence, and text completion question types. The reading comprehension portion of the test includes several written passages. Students answer various questions based on the information in a passage by choosing from a set of multiple choice answer options. After reading a lengthy passage, students may be asked about the theme of a passage or the intent of its author. Or, they may be asked about the implied meaning of a passage or the reasons behind a statement.

Alternatively, the sentence equivalence portion of the test asks students to choose two words that would correctly complete each sentence. For example:

Example 1: The artist known for her picturesque landscapes once commented that she ____ nature. 
A) idolizes
B) abhors
C) reveres
D) despises
E) detests
F) scorns
Answers: A, C

Example 2: A student who tries to cram for a biology final exam in one night will become _____ because it’s impossible to learn an entire course in so little time. 
A) exacerbated
B) inspired
C) exasperated
D) lethargic
E) complaisant
F) dispassionate
Answers: C, D

The text completion questions feature a passage consisting of four or five sentences. There may be one or several blank spaces in the passage. Students have a choice of three or more options for each blank. If a student is not sure about the definition of a word, sometimes looking at a word’s prefix can offer clues. Our professional instructors provide tips to students who need help on this or any other section of the GRE.

Example: The horse and rider emerged from the woods and cantered up a hillside ______ by the moon. The horse made a sharp turn sending the rider tumbling to the ground. The rider slowly stood up, cursing under his breath. He was ______ at his lack of talent as an equestrian.
A) ill-lighted:abhorred
B) illuminated:vexed
C) darkened:appalled
D) enlightened:humiliated
E) obscured:angered
Answer: B

Looking for GRE practice questions online can be helpful when reviewing for the analogy section. In this section, students choose the pair of words that is most similar to the pair of words in the example. One of the strategies we teach our students is to determine the relationship between the words in the example to arrive at the correct answer option. For instance:

Example: ASSAUGE : SORROW 
A) counsel : exacerbate
B) withhold : appreciation
C) companionship : loneliness
D) endear : criticize
E) console : aggravate
Answer: C

The Quantitative Section
There are a variety of math questions in this section of the GRE. Practice test questions may challenge a student’s algebra, geometry, arithmetic, or data analysis skills.

Example 1: Which of these numbers is the average of the first ten even numbers?
A) 9
B) 13
C) 11
D) 16
E) 15
2+4+6+8+10+12+14+16+18+20=110/10
Answer: C

Example 2: (12/3) x (8/4) =
A) 18
B) 10
C) 8
D) 12
E) 14
Answer: C

Example 3: If 8t + 5t +2t + 4t=114, then 5t + 3= 
A) 20
B) 33
C) 25
D) 32
E) 40
Answer: B

The Analytical Writing Section
This section requires students to write both an issue and an argument essay. Students receive a prompt for both essays. A sample prompt for the issue essay may ask students whether they agree or disagree with the idea of paying high school students for perfect attendance. Alternatively, a sample prompt for the argument essay may center on the argument of legalizing medical marijuana. Regardless of what side a student takes, he or she should create a well-organized essay and a convincing argument.

We are experts at helping students prepare for the GRE. Test sample questions are easier to manage when students partner with one of our online instructors. Email or call us to find out more about our prep classes for the GRE. Our helpful team at Veritas Prep gives students the tools to succeed on the GRE!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

What Subjects Are on the GRE Exam?

SAT/ACTWhat subjects are on the GRE? Many students are aware of the standard Graduate Record Examination, or GRE, but may not know as much about the GRE subject tests. These tests reveal a student’s skills and knowledge in a specific subject. Here, you can discover more about the seven GRE subject tests offered to students who plan to apply to graduate school, as well as what subjects you can expect to find on each test.

Mathematics
About 50 percent of the mathematics test consists of calculus questions. The questions cover both integral and differential calculus. A student must be prepared to apply calculus concepts when completing this section. Students will also encounter basic, linear, and abstract algebra questions. They must understand systems of linear equations, characteristic polynomials, group theory, and number theory among other concepts. Other test topics include geometry, statistics, probability, and algorithms.

There are a total of 66 multiple-choice questions on this test. Students preparing for the mathematics test can benefit from the knowledge and experience of our professional instructors at Veritas Prep. In our online courses, we teach students effective test-taking strategies and tips that help them approach the GRE subject tests with confidence.

Physics
This test challenges a student’s understanding and application of the principles of physics. There are 100 multiple-choice questions on the physics test. A student’s prep work should include studying topics such as electromagnetism, classical mechanics, atomic physics, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. Knowledge of calculus, coordinate systems, partial differential equations, and vector algebra is also helpful when completing questions on the physics test.

Biology
Questions on cellular and molecular biology make up the first section of the biology test. Cell structure, cell function, genetics, DNA, and plant and animal viruses are all topics in this section. The second section on this test is all about organismal biology. Many of the questions concern animal and plant reproduction and development. Other questions relate to the instincts of animals and how plants and animals interact with their environment. There are also questions on fungi and its life cycle.

The third section on the biology test contains questions about ecology and evolution. Students are tested on behavioral ecology and ecosystems, as well as evolutionary processes. The instructors who teach our GRE subject test prep classes at Veritas Prep use high-quality resources to guide students as they study the various topics covered on the biology test.

Chemistry
The 130 questions on this test focus on a variety of chemistry skills. The test covers analytical, organic, inorganic and physical chemistry. Some physical chemistry questions focus on the three laws of thermodynamics. There are organic chemistry questions that test a student’s skills with organometallics and various functional groups. Questions on physical chemistry and organic chemistry make up the bulk of this test. Veritas Prep’s instructors help students practice for all of the topics on this challenging test.

Biochemistry
Questions on biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, and genetics are all a part of this subject test. Students use their problem-solving skills to answer many of the 170 questions on this test. They are presented with diagrams and experimental results and must choose the correct multiple-choice option based on the data they are given. Thermodynamics, kinetics, the cell cycle, chromosomes, and genome maintenance are some of the topics that students can expect to encounter on the biochemistry test.

English
The English test gives students an opportunity to display their knowledge of great works of literature. The 230 questions on this test challenge students to identify literary movements or may ask what time period a particular short story, novel, or poem belongs to. Some of the questions are factual while others are analytical. Students should be skilled at analyzing works of literature to identify genre or references made within a piece of writing. In addition, they should be knowledgeable about literary criticism.

Psychology
There are 205 multiple-choice questions on the psychology test. The questions are designed to test a student’s ability to analyze relationships, apply psychological principles and draw conclusions based on research data. Some of the topics found on the psychology test include memory, perception, behavioral neuroscience, abnormal psychology and the history of psychology.

Our helpful staff is glad to supply additional information to students who want to know what subjects are on the GRE. They are welcome to contact Veritas Prep regarding our GRE subject test prep courses. There are also helpful answers on our frequently asked questions page. We are proud to give students the tools they need to find success on these critical tests!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

How to Prepare and Practice for the GRE Verbal Reasoning Section

stressed-studentThe Verbal Reasoning section of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) challenges a student’s reading comprehension, vocabulary, and sentence completion skills. Our talented instructors at Veritas Prep teach students how to prepare for GRE Verbal Reasoning questions. There are several practical strategies available to students that can help them conquer even the most difficult questions in this section.

Check out some valuable tips that students may use to prep for the Verbal Reasoning questions on the GRE:

Complete One or More Practice Exams
Taking a practice test is an important step in preparing for the GRE. Verbal Reasoning practice questions give students a sneak preview of what to expect on the test. Furthermore, students can look at the results of a practice test to determine which skills they need to work on.

Some students may do well on the reading comprehension questions, but need a little help with questions that involve analogies. Other students may experience success with questions that involve antonyms and synonyms, but have trouble with questions that ask them to identify the main point of a written passage. Our Veritas Prep professional instructors are able to provide students with techniques on how to improve specific skills tested in the Verbal Reasoning section.

Put Tips and Strategies Into Practice
After working with a Veritas Prep instructor for a time, it’s a good idea for students to take another practice test. This helps them get into the habit of using our strategies on the GRE. Verbal practice questions are much easier to handle when a student employs our strategies.

One example of an easy test-taking strategy is to look at the question, as well as all of the answer options before reading a passage. Skimming the question and the answer options gives a student an idea of what to look for in the passage. Perhaps the question concerns the main idea of the passage or asks a student to notice something about its supporting details. Our instructors are experts at providing strategies that help students pinpoint the most important parts of a passage.

Another simple strategy can be used on sentence completion questions in the GRE Verbal section – look through all of the answer options and eliminate choices that are obviously incorrect. In addition, it’s helpful to plug each answer option into the sentence and read it to see if it makes sense. Students who want to take advantage of these and other strategies for the GRE are encouraged to contact our offices to sign up for a prep course today.

Read Magazines and Newspapers
Reading magazines and newspapers is another way for students to prepare for the GRE. Verbal practice questions require a student to be familiar with a lot of vocabulary words. A student who reads magazine and newspaper articles is likely to encounter some of the same vocabulary words that appear on the GRE. Art, science and news magazines are ideal choices for students who want to see these vocabulary words in context. Seeing unfamiliar vocabulary words used in context is an effective way of retaining a word as well as its definition.

Students who study online with Veritas Prep are giving themselves an extra advantage on the GRE. Verbal prep exercises can help them to feel less anxious about the test. Our team uses effective study resources to help students thoroughly prepare for the Verbal Reasoning section of the GRE.

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

What is an Average GRE Score?

GMATIndividuals who want to take the Graduate Record Examination, or GRE, must do a lot of prep work. Most students have many questions about the test, among them: What is the average GRE score? They want to know so they have an idea of the scores other students around the country receive. Take a look at some average GRE scores, and learn how our talented team at Veritas Prep helps students to highlight their academic skills on this test.

What Is the Average GRE Score?
Before looking at the average scores on the revised GRE, it’s helpful to know the scoring range for each section of the test. A student can receive a score of anywhere between 130 and 170 on the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative sections. On the Analytical Writing section, students can score from 0 to 6 points, in half point increments. On the GRE, average scores are as follows: 150.2 points for the Verbal Reasoning section, 152.5 points for the Quantitative section, and 3.5 points for the Analytical Writing section.

Most schools display the average test scores of their applicants on their official websites. Students who visit the website of a particular school to read its admission guidelines can often find out the average GRE scores of students who gain acceptance into the institution. This is a good way for a student to find out what he or she needs to achieve on the GRE in order to make it into a particular graduate school.

Growing Stronger in Every Subject on the GRE
Taking a practice test is one of the most effective ways of finding a student’s strengths and weaknesses on the GRE. With the help of his or her instructor, a student is able to pinpoint skills that need improvement. This prevents a student from devoting too much study time to skills that he or she already knows.

Once a student realizes what needs improvement, he or she can receive guidance from a Veritas Prep instructor regarding how to sharpen those skills. In many cases, our instructors provide students with a whole new way to approach a reading question or a math equation. Not surprisingly, many students continue to practice the skills they learn at Veritas Prep all of the way through graduate school! Once students begin to strengthen specific skills for the GRE, they gain a new sense of confidence and a more positive attitude toward the test.

Strategies and Tips for the GRE
We understand that most students want to excel on the GRE. Average scores are seen as a baseline by ambitious students who want their graduate school application to stand out in a crowd. The strategies our instructors share with students help them to complete the test in the most efficient way possible.

For instance, we teach students how to filter out the most significant parts of a written passage so they can determine the correct answer option. We also offer students strategies that assist them in simplifying complicated math equations. We guide students in learning how to jot down an outline that includes elements that will help them to create two organized essays for the test. Our professional instructors are very familiar with the GRE, so they are able to convey tips to students based on their own test-taking experiences.

The Night Before the Test
Veritas Prep students benefit in a number of different ways from our GRE prep courses as well as our first-rate study resources. But, there are additional things they can do to feel ready for the test. For instance, the evening before the test students can be sure to eat a nutritious dinner with plenty of protein as well as fruits and vegetables. A healthy meal the night before the test can set the stage for a successful test day. Also, students are wise to get to bed early so they feel well-rested the next day. Trying to cram information the night before the GRE is non-productive and adds to a student’s stress level.

Students can contact our staff by telephone or email to find out more about our GRE prep services. We are glad to offer more information about our online or in-person courses. At Veritas Prep, we want all of our students to perform at their very best on the GRE!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

The Online GRE Math Study Guide: Help and Practice Tips for the GRE Math Section

books_stackedThe Graduate Record Exam (GRE) contains three parts; the Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative, and Analytical Writing sections. The Quantitative section of the GRE tests students on a variety of math skills. Many students contact our staff at Veritas Prep when they want a little help preparing for this section of the test. Our knowledgeable instructors use first-rate study resources to guide students through the process of preparing for the Quantitative, as well as the other sections on the test.

Check out this GRE math study guide for tips that can simplify questions in the Quantitative or math section:

Take Practice Exams
When it comes to GRE math practice, online exams can prove very useful to students. Taking a practice test lets a student know what types of problems to expect on the actual test, and the results of a practice test reveal what a student needs to work on. Students who have this information are better able to make efficient use of their study time. Our instructors review practice tests with students and suggest specific ways that they can improve on various skills. Our Veritas Prep instructors partner with their students to provide the best GRE math prep available!

Plugging in the Numbers
One of the easiest strategies that students can use when tackling the Quantitative section of the GRE is to approach a problem starting with the answer options. For instance, an algebra question may come in the form of an equation that asks a student to find the value of X. A student can plug each of the answer options into the equation in place of X. The number that completes the equation is the correct answer option. This strategy proves especially helpful when a student works a problem in the traditional way and finds that his or her answer is not one of the answer options.

Eliminating Answer Options
Students looking for GRE math help should endeavor to simplify each problem as much as possible. For example, after looking at a question and considering all of the multiple choice answer options, a student may notice that one or two of the answer options are obviously incorrect. The student can cross out or eliminate these answer options. This leaves the student with fewer options to consider and makes the problem more manageable. This test-taking technique can also be used on multiple choice questions in the Verbal Reasoning section of the GRE.

Getting Into the Habit of Using Scrap Paper
Students should get into the habit of writing out all of the steps of a math problem on a sheet of scrap paper. This is one of those GRE math tips that many students are aware of, but decide not to put into practice; however, this tip can save a student a lot of time if there is a mistake somewhere in a problem. If a student’s answer is not displayed in the list of answer options, he or she can refer to the scrap paper and review the various steps of the problem. In addition, students should use scrap paper for drawing shapes referred to in a math question. Seeing a shape can sometimes prompt a student to figure out an answer more quickly than trying to visualize the shape.

Reviewing High School Math Problems
For students who want more GRE math practice, online exercises for high school students are an option. Many of the geometry and algebra skills tested in the Quantitative section are skills students learned in high school.

In addition to going online to complete practice math questions, a student can look in traditional math textbooks designed for high school students. This sort of prep helps students become familiar with working the steps of an algebra equation or successfully completing a geometry problem. Our professional instructors offer guidance and encouragement to students as they work their way through practice problems. We provide students with individualized help, so they can see great improvement as test day approaches.

Finally, students interested in learning the details about our services can look at our FAQ page to find helpful answers. We offer online courses that are convenient for individuals with busy school or work schedules. Veritas Prep has the best GRE math prep courses for students who want to enjoy success on the GRE!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

10 Tips to Creating an Effective GRE Study Plan

help - wordsCreating a GRE study plan is one way a student can thoroughly prepare for this exam. A study plan helps a student to stay organized and absorb all of the necessary material.

Take a look at ten tips for creating a GRE study plan that can contribute to a student’s confidence level on test day.

1. Take a Practice Test
It’s important for students to take a practice GRE before creating a study plan. The results of this test reveal the subject areas (PDF) in need of the most improvement. Consequently, students can build a study plan that focuses on those subjects. At Veritas Prep, our GRE tutoring services include reviewing practice test results with students. Our online tutors provide students with strategies that help them to master questions in every section of the GRE.

2. Set a Target Score
Students should set a target score for the GRE. This gives them a concrete idea of what they are working to achieve. Of course, students who reach their target score on a practice test should continue preparing just as vigorously for the GRE. A student’s goal is to achieve and surpass his or her target score!

3. Create Study Tasks for Each Day of the Week
The best GRE study plans are the ones that include specific details. Students should plan to study at least ten hours per week. Many students prefer to study for two hours every weekday, leaving their weekends free. On Monday from 3:00 to 4:00 a student may work on completing ten sample geometry questions and ten algebra questions. From 4:00 to 5:00, the student memorizes twenty vocabulary words and their definitions. A detailed study plan allows a student to get down to work right away without having to decide what to do for the hour.

4. Choose an Optimal Study Time
Deciding when to study is part of making a study plan for GRE. Some students study best in the early morning, while others are more receptive in the evening. Students who take this self- knowledge into account are giving themselves an extra advantage as they prep for the GRE.

5. Get an Expert to Evaluate the Study Plan
Our instructors at Veritas Prep can evaluate a student’s study plan to see if any improvements can be made. All of our professional GRE tutors achieved high scores on the exam. This means that they have unique insight on the most effective ways to prep. In short, students have access to invaluable tips that make their study plan all the more effective.

6. Create Rewards for Meeting Small Goals
Most GRE study plans cover a period of months; that’s why it’s an excellent idea for students to reward themselves when they reach short term goals. For instance, a student may create a reward of going to a movie with a friend once he or she finishes memorizing fifty vocabulary words. These little incentives can refresh a student’s motivation.

7. Determine an Appropriate Place to Study
The right environment contributes to the effectiveness of study time. A student should choose an environment with very few people and no televisions, radios or other distractions. Some suggestions include a private study room at a library, a quiet room at home or an unoccupied picnic bench at a local park.

8. Factor Exceptions into a Study Plan
An effective study plan for GRE has the element of flexibility. Inevitably, things arise that will disrupt a student’s study time. If a student has to skip a weekday study session, he or she should reschedule those hours for the weekend. It’s best to makeup missed days whenever possible.

9. Set Aside Time for Quick Review
A week or two prior to test day, students should incorporate short review sessions into the plan. For instance, students may take thirty minutes out of a two hour study session to review with vocabulary flashcards. Or, they may use twenty minutes of study time to take a quick geometry quiz on basic concepts. These quick reviews can help them retain more material.

10. Don’t Forget the Night Before the Test
A study plan should include a student’s activities the night before the test. A student may want to make a note of items to put aside for the following morning, when to eat dinner and when to go to bed. A student’s activities the night before the test can set a positive tone for test day.

Our talented GRE instructors at Veritas Prep specialize in helping students prepare for this important exam. Our study resources and materials add to the quality of our courses. Contact our offices today and get the advantage on the GRE with Veritas Prep.

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

The GRE and the Ivy League

Princeton UniversityThe Graduate Record Examination, or GRE, is a test taken by students who plan to apply to graduate school. Not surprisingly, students must achieve high scores on this test if they want to be accepted into a school in the Ivy League. GRE scores earned by students in Ivy League schools differ depending on the study program, but in most study programs at Ivy League schools, students have GRE scores that rank in the 95th percentile or above.

In short, students who want to attend graduate school in the Ivy League must have a high GRE score to be considered. Discover more about the GRE and what students can do to achieve high scores that can help them get into a graduate program at an Ivy League school.

The Sections of the GRE
The GRE has three parts, including the Quantitative Reasoning, Verbal Reasoning, and Analytical Writing sections. The Verbal Reasoning section asks students to evaluate written material. This section tests students’ reading comprehension skills as well as their ability to identify words and concepts. The Quantitative Reasoning section tests students’ problem-solving skills – basic arithmetic, algebra, ratios, number properties, geometry, and data analysis problems are all included in this section of the GRE. A student’s critical thinking skills are put to the test in the Analytical Writing section. Students must create an organized written piece with plenty of evidence to support their ideas.

Scoring on the GRE
Students taking the GRE should know that there is a score assigned to each of the three sections of the test. For the Quantitative Reasoning and Verbal sections, the score range goes from 130 to 170. The score range is 0 to 6 for the Analytical Writing section of the test. Points for the Verbal and Quantitative Reasoning sections are awarded in one-point increments. The Analytical Writing section, on the other hand, is scored in half-point increments.

Study Tips for the GRE
Learning vocabulary words is an important part of the GRE prep process. Of course, it’s a good idea to practice with flashcards. Flashcards are excellent for memorizing words and their definitions. But it also helps for students to see vocabulary words used in context. This can be accomplished by reading magazines and newspapers. Also, the Internet is one of the best resources for books and articles. Seeing an unfamiliar word in context is an effective way for a student to absorb the word’s definition.

Another tip is to take several practice tests. This is an excellent way for a student to determine which skills need the most improvement. Plus, a student can gain confidence as they see progress with each set of practice test results.

In addition, students should make a point of starting to prepare as soon as possible for the GRE. Studying material for the GRE should be done in a gradual way over a period of months – it’s a good idea for a student to study daily for the GRE. Some students think of studying for the GRE as a part-time job. This helps them to incorporate GRE study time into their daily lives. Students who feel rushed or try to cram on information just days before the test are not likely to perform at their best on the GRE.

Studying With the Experts
At Veritas Prep, we offer courses that can help students prepare for the GRE. Our talented instructors have all achieved great success on the GRE, so students who study with Veritas Prep are learning test-taking strategies from individuals with hands-on experience! We provide students with both in-person and online tutoring options, making it easy for students to find the option that best fits into their busy schedule. Our instructors also offer students the encouragement they need to boost their confidence in the days before the test.

In addition to our GRE prep courses, we provide students with guidance on MBA admissions. Our professional consultants have experience working in the admissions offices at Ivy League schools, so we have inside information on what it takes to get into the Ivy League. GRE scores can improve with the help of our proven program and skillful tutors. From GRE prep to college admissions guidance, Veritas Prep can help you on the road to achieving your academic goals.

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

How Are GRE Scores Sent to Institutions?

Columbia - LowNaturally, students who are planning to take the GRE want to learn as much as possible about the test. For instance, many students are curious about the scoring system for the GRE. Also, they want to know how to send GRE scores to graduate schools. Learn the details about the scoring system on the GRE. In addition, discover how to send GRE scores to four or more graduate schools.

The Scoring System for the GRE
Before thinking about sending GRE scores to schools, students must learn the basics of the scoring system for the test. The GRE has three parts, including the Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Analytical Writing sections. Students can score from 130 to 170 points on both the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative sections of the exam. These two sections of the test are scored in one-point increments. The scoring range is zero to six for the Analytical Writing portion of the GRE. This section of the test is scored in half-point increments.

What Is On a Student’s Score Report?
The typical GRE score report displays a student’s basic information, including the person’s name, address, phone number, email address, and birth date. It also notes a student’s intended major as well as their test date. The report features the scores a student received on the three sections of the GRE. The officials who offer the GRE send scores to graduate schools about ten to 15 days after a student takes the computer-delivered test. Alternatively, students who take the paper-delivered GRE have their scores sent out to schools six weeks after the test date.

How to Send GRE Scores to Graduate Schools
Students are not responsible for physically sending GRE scores to universities. When students register to take the GRE, they can arrange to have their scores sent to up to four schools of their choice – this arrangement is covered by a student’s test fee. A student’s GRE scores are valid for five years. This is convenient for students if they want to take the GRE but aren’t settled on a definite starting date for graduate school.

The Process of Designating Score Report Recipients
Some students know exactly where they want to send their GRE scores, while others need some time to think about it. The process of designating score report recipients is different depending on how a student takes the GRE. Students who take the computer-delivered GRE must take their list of four schools with them to the test center, but students who opt for the paper-delivered GRE have to specify four graduate schools when they register for the test.

Sending Test Scores to Additional Schools
Some students who take the GRE send scores to more than four graduate schools. Of course, there is a fee for sending out additional score reports. Students can order these reports online or arrange for them by mail or fax. Additional score reports that are requested online are sent out five days after the order is received. Additional reports that are ordered via mail or fax are sent out to schools ten days after the request is made. The ability to send additional score reports is perfect for students who are interested in the programs of several different graduate schools.

Studying for the GRE
Students who take practice tests and then take action to improve in weaker subject areas are likely to perform well on the GRE. Students can also get an advantage on the GRE by allowing themselves several months to prepare. For instance, students who want to learn new vocabulary words for the Verbal Reasoning section have an easier time absorbing unfamiliar words and their definitions in a gradual way.

For the best results, take advantage of the effective GRE prep courses at Veritas Prep. All of our professional instructors achieved high scores on the GRE, so students who study with us are learning tips and strategies from tutors who have practical experience with this challenging exam.

Our instructors at Veritas Prep stand ready to help students who want to excel on the GRE. Our classes are available both online and in person to meet the needs of ambitious students. We give students the confidence they need to showcase their skills on the test. Contact Veritas Prep today and partner with the experts for the GRE!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

Is Taking the GRE Without Studying Really an Option?

StudentStudents who want to go to graduate school and earn an advanced degree have a lot of things to accomplish before they start that journey. Taking the Graduate Record Examination, or the GRE, is just one of the things on the to-do list of a future graduate student.

Some students wonder if it’s necessary to study for the GRE. Can they save themselves some time by taking the GRE without studying for it? If you’re considering this tactic, learn the risks of taking this exam without preparing for it. Also, discover what students can do to earn an impressive score on the GRE.

The Disadvantages of Taking the GRE Without Studying
A student who sits down to take the GRE without studying is likely to be familiar with a lot of the topics on the test. But it’s also likely that the person’s score won’t reflect what they are really capable of.

For example, a student who doesn’t study may feel confident about most of the arithmetic, geometry, and data analysis questions on the Quantitative Reasoning section of the GRE, but the student might be confused by some of the algebra problems. They might vaguely remember some of the concepts but be unsure how to put them into practice. As a result, the student would receive a low score on the Quantitative Reasoning section. This is something that the student could’ve avoided with a few weeks of algebra review and practice.

Another disadvantage of taking the test without preparing is that a student won’t be familiar with the content or the structure of the GRE. Being familiar with the test ahead of time can give a student an extra dose of confidence on test day.

How Long Does it Take to Prepare for the GRE?
Once a student makes the decision to prepare for the GRE, they will want to know how much time to devote to the process. Students should take a practice test to determine the amount of time needed to prepare. A student who does well in every subject but one may only need one month of study, while another student must study for six months to ensure success on every section of the test. GRE preparation time depends upon the individual and their need for review.

How to Prep for the GRE
Along with taking a practice test, one of the best tips for students who are planning to take the GRE is to create a study schedule. It’s best if they incorporate study hours into their daily routine. Some students may set up a schedule that allows them two hours of GRE study per day. For instance, on Monday, a student might work on memorizing ten new vocabulary words and their definitions and tackle two pages of algebra problems. Tuesdays could be for studying geometry problems and working on reading comprehension skills, such as drawing conclusions and finding main ideas. Creating a study schedule allows a student to absorb the necessary study material in a gradual way.

At Veritas Prep, we offer courses that help students prepare to conquer the GRE. Our professional instructors teach strategies to students that they can use on every section of the exam. Furthermore, we hire instructors who have excelled on the test. In short, our students get valuable GRE advice from instructors who have been there and done that!

Tips for Success on the Exam
When it comes to the GRE, one of the most effective study techniques is to create flashcards for unfamiliar vocabulary words. A student can use the flashcards during regular study time or review them while waiting in a line at a store or sitting in the dentist’s office. They are a convenient study tool. Another useful piece of GRE advice for students is to check off each skill as they master it. This provides encouragement for students and helps them see solid progress as test day approaches.

Students who want to know more about how to prepare for GRE test questions can also benefit from working with the expert instructors at Veritas Prep. We do more than teach students how to pass the GRE: We teach them how to excel on the test! Contact our dedicated staff at Veritas Prep today.

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

The Biggest Mistakes You Can Make in the GRE Verbal Section: Text Completion Questions

GRE VERBALIf you’re studying for the GRE Verbal section, you’re probably thinking a lot in terms of vocabulary. Both the Text Completion and Sentence Equivalence question types involve selecting a word that fills in a blank – a classic vocabulary-type setup.

While you do need a healthy vocabulary to be able to succeed on the Verbal section, people that overemphasize vocabulary (who are memorizing as many obscure words and definitions as possible) tend to feel a bit underprepared when they get to the test for the amount of critical thinking and work you need to put into some of these questions.

Before you continue, check out Part 1 of this lesson here, then keep reading or check out our video explanation of this concept below:

One thing to think about with GRE Verbal questions is how much work and critical thought you’ll need. It’s not just a quick response of, “Oh! I know that meaning; I know that word!” As you’ll see with the example below, a lot of times you need to be flexible in your thinking, willing to split hairs on the meanings of words that you already know, and have that willingness to start over and take a fresh look at the problem.

Now let’s take a look at what we mean by this concept with an example question:

Because of the author’s (i)______, many readers consider his latest work (ii)______ but, in reality, as many knowledgeable critics point out, the piece (iii)______.

Blank (i)
A) eloquence
B) prejudice
C) verbosity

Blank (ii)
D) inaccessible
E) poignant
F) polarizing

Blank (iii)
G) lack coherence and lucidity
H) has no discernible conclusion
I) is the most succinct on the subject

This is a classic Text Completion problem where you have three blanks and three answer choices for each. Now let’s talk about how people tend to approach this question:

Test-takers tend to find that the first two blanks agree with each other. “Because of one thing, someone will think another thing that is related.” As such, they start to see relationships between some of the answer choices. They might say, “Because someone is so ‘eloquent’ we think that their point is ‘poignant.'” Or, they might say, “Because someone is so ‘prejudiced’ people find their work is ‘polarizing.'” Or you may even say, “Due to the ‘verbosity’ – because someone uses so many words – their work is ‘inaccessible’ and difficult to get into.”

Now, the trick (or trap) with this kind of a setup is that test-takers tend to fall in love with their favorite pairings of the first two answer choices (A/E and  B/F). Maybe this is because people tend to start with answer choice A (eloquence) and then find a nice match for it (poignant). Then they just want to wedge in one of the last answer choices. A lot of times, test-takers will answer this question with “eloquence,” “poignant,” and “no discernible conclusion” or “lacks coherence.”

Here’s where you need to think critically about this question, and where the work really comes into play. Is it the really the case that the opposite of “poignant” is “doesn’t have a discernible conclusion” – that this is the counterpoint that comes with the transition word “but” in the middle of the sentence?  What if there isn’t really a conclusion because the author’s work is open-ended? It’s up for interpretation, but it could still be poignant. This is at least a possibility you might want to think about.

This also gets into one other thing that people tend to be underprepared for: making sure that every word in the prompt matters. In writing this test, the question writers aren’t getting paid by the word. If they put in something about “knowledgeable critics,” you should be asking yourself, “Why would these critics be the ones to point this out?” If you’re at this point still thinking about the first two answer choices maybe you’re right, but you should also see this as an invitation – you have to know, particularly if there’s a third blank space, with 5-7 words in some of the answer choices, that the Testmakers put that there, not because of a vocabulary word, but because of the meaning of the sentence. You’re really looking for one combination that has a very clear, very logical meaning.

So if we focus on these knowledgeable critics, again, you should ask yourself, “Why would they need to be the ones to point something out?” What you’ll find is that the correct logic for this question is that because of the author’s “verbosity” people find the work “inaccessible” and hard to get into, but, as the “knowledgeable critics” will point out, “We know this topic inside and out. This is actually the most succinct work you’re going to find on this dense topic. It’s not the author’s fault for being verbose.” So the correct answers are options C, D, and I.

The overall lesson of this question is important: when you have multiple blanks, a lot of times this means you need to go to work. You can’t fall in love with a strategy like, “Oh, great! I went from left to right, I found an answer for Blank 1 that I like that fits with an answer from Blank 2 that I like. Now I’ll just try to take a square peg and put it in a round hole with Blank 3 so I can be done…” One of the great virtues with multiple blank text completion is that you need to have the patience to say, “This is an okay triplet or pair, but I may be able to do better,” and then to start over and really go to work.

So as you approach GRE Verbal, make sure you have a robust vocabulary to go into it, but don’t let that come at the expense of your willingness to roll up your sleeves, really think of the meaning of the entire sentence, and maybe start over and look for different combinations. Because in a lot of ways, GRE Verbal is about your willingness to work.

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

By Brian Galvin.

The Biggest Mistakes You Can Make in the GRE Verbal Section: Sentence Equivalence Questions

08fba0fLet’s talk some GRE Verbal. Now, if you’re studying for the GRE Verbal section, you’re thinking about Text Completion and Sentence Equivalence as two major question types that you need to be ready for. And as you’ll see, you can talk about them in terms of the word “vocabulary,” because the right answers tend to be an individual word or a short phrase that is some kind of “vocabulary” –  a word you need to know the meaning of and fit into the meaning of the sentence.

Here’s where students tend to study wrong, ineffectively, and inefficiently: they over-study their 500-word flash card decks (the most ridiculous and obscure words they can find). Yes, you do need to have a decent vocabulary to do well on these questions, but what these students don’t study enough as they’re chasing really strange words over and over again – which they may only see three or four of on test day – is knowing that, very often, these questions require you to work.

Continue reading or check out our video explanation of this concept below:

It’s not about knowing some memorized definition of a weird word – often, the test will use words you know, but you will need to work a little bit to figure out exactly what type of meaning you need in that sentence, and whether that word you’re looking at (a word you probably use in sentences every day, week, month, etc.) has the precise meaning you need in that particular space.

Now let’s take a look at this Sentence Equivalence example that will shed some light on what we’re talking about:

While the cost of migrating to more automated piloting and air traffic control systems is substantial, the eventual cost savings are large enough that the up-front expenditures are not as ______ as opponents claim.

Select the two choices that fit the meaning of the sentence and give the sentence the same meaning.

(A) fiscal
(B) imprudent
(C) reasonable
(D) excessive
(E) massive
(F) paltry

Now, if you look at what’s going on in this sentence, we have a contrast (and the word “while” sets this up). The sentence is saying that even though the cost is substantial – we’re agreeing this will cost a lot of money – what you’re going to save in the long run means that it’s not as *blank* (as big of a deal) as opponents claim.

What tends to happen with this problem is people look for synonyms. They say, “We think the cost is big, but maybe not as big as we once thought,” so they’ll look and see “excessive” and “massive” –two words that in some way mean “big”. Then they’ll pick those answer choices and get this question wrong. Why are these choices wrong? It’s about a little, subtle difference in meaning, and the Testmaker wants to reward those who pick up on it.

The word “massive” means “big,” while the word “excessive” means “too big.” If you look at what’s going on in the sentence, anytime there’s a comma (or two sentences in one prompt), the part that is not near the blank space really does matter. This is a classic “Think Like the Testmaker” moment – you should be thinking, “Why did they put that part there? To reward those who are thinking of the meaning of the whole sentence.”

Nobody is arguing that changing to automated piloting is not a big cost. Nobody is saying, “Hey, while it’s big, actually it’s not big.” What they really want to say is, “Hey, this is going to cost you a lot of money – it’s a big expenditure up front – but in the end, you’re going to save enough money that it’s not too big of an investment or an unwise decision.” So what you really want here is “too big”. We’re not debating whether the expense is big or not; we’re only debating whether it’s a wise investment, or too much to spend up front.

With this in mind, answer choice E, “massive” or “big,” is wrong, even though it’s really tempting. “Imprudent,” on the other hand, means “impractical” or “too big,” which is what we’re looking for. So the answers are B and D. Again, what this question really comes down to is that tiny, subtle difference between the meanings of words that you know. In this case, we want “too big,” so the test tries to hit you with a word that means “big.” That’s what we mean when we say you need to prepare to work on these questions. It’s about understanding the meaning of the sentence as a whole, finding those subtle differences, and holding up the words you’re putting in the blank and saying, “Is that really the exact word I need, or are they just overall related?”

As you study for the GRE Verbal section, you do want to have a good vocabulary, but don’t let that come at the expense of your willingness to really go to work on subtle differences in meaning with words that you know.

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

By Brian Galvin.

Strategies for GRE Reading Comprehension

SATThe Graduate Record Examination, or the GRE, has three sections – one of them is the Verbal Reasoning section. Within this section, there are sentence equivalence, text completion, and reading comprehension questions. The reading comprehension questions test a student’s ability to understand the type of reading material they will deal with in graduate school courses. Look at the types of reading comprehension questions found on the GRE and learn how to effectively study for them:

What Skills Are Needed to Master Reading Comprehension Questions on the GRE?
Many of the reading comprehension questions on the GRE require students to summarize passages and draw conclusions about what they’ve read. Students need to be able to find the strengths and weaknesses in a position taken by the author of a passage. Recognizing vocabulary words used in sentences and understanding how they contribute to the overall meaning of a passage are other skills a student needs to know. Also, they have to be able to distinguish main ideas from minor details.

In order to find success with these types of questions and others, students must know how to read in an active way by asking questions and drawing conclusions as they go. These skills will prove invaluable in graduate school, as well.

The Types of Reading Comprehension Questions on the GRE
The types of questions on the test help to measure a student’s skills in reading comprehension. GRE questions are mostly multiple-choice. There are traditional multiple-choice questions where a student chooses one option out of several. Also, there are reading comprehension questions that ask students to choose more than one answer – there may even be three correct answers to one question.

Select-in-passage questions are also included on the GRE. To answer this type of question, a student must read a passage and click on or highlight a particular sentence that fulfills a given description. Select-in-passage questions are only found on the computer-based GRE. Individuals taking the paper-based version of the GRE will answer multiple-choice questions that measure the same skills as select-in-passage questions.

GRE Reading Comprehension Tips
Along with contacting Veritas Prep, students can do many things to prepare for the GRE. Reading comprehension practice questions are a necessity for any student who wants to fare well on the test. Students can go online to find GRE reading comprehension practice questions that can help them to determine what skills to work on.

Another thing to do when preparing for the test is to study vocabulary words found on the GRE. Becoming familiar with these words and their definitions can help students better understand the sentences and passages on the test.

In addition to learning vocabulary words, it’s a good idea for students to make it a point to read magazine and newspaper articles. A sample GRE reading list could include The New York Times, The Atlantic Monthly, Popular Science, and The Economist. Seeing various vocabulary words in context is helpful when a student is trying to retain new definitions. One of the best GRE reading comprehension tips for students to follow is to establish the habit of becoming an engaged reader, whether you’re reading fiction or nonfiction. Asking questions and looking for the meaning within a piece of written work is something every reader has to learn and practice.

At Veritas Prep, we provide GRE tutoring services to students who would like some help preparing for the reading comprehension questions on the exam. Each of our instructors has achieved a high score on the GRE, so students who work with us are learning from individuals who have mastered the reading comprehension questions, along with all of the others, on the GRE! Reading comprehension strategies play an important part in our GRE prep classes. We show students how to simplify the process of arriving at the correct answer option.

Our professional instructors at Veritas Prep know how to prepare students for the GRE. We review reading comprehension questions with students to determine both their weaknesses and strengths. Consequently, we can make the most efficient use of a study period. And we are proud to offer both online and in-person GRE prep classes to meet the needs of our students. Contact Veritas Prep today to sign up for success on the GRE!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

Tips for Mastering the GRE’s Sentence Equivalence and Text Completion Sections

EssayThe Verbal Reasoning section is just one of three parts on the Graduate Record Examination, also known as the GRE. In this section, students must answer both sentence equivalence and text completion questions.

Take a closer look at what these types of questions entail, and learn some strategies for arriving at the correct answers:

What Are Sentence Equivalence Questions?
For each sentence equivalence question, a student is given a sentence with a blank space. Instead of choosing just one answer option to put into the blank space, a student must choose two – when put into the blank space, each answer option should create a logical sentence. Furthermore, both complete sentences should have the same meaning. There are a total of six answer options for each sentence equivalence question.

Strategies for Mastering Sentence Equivalence Questions
There are many things students can do to improve their performance on this part of the GRE. Sentence equivalence practice should start with reading the entire sentence and scanning all of the answer choice options. One of the most effective GRE sentence completion tips for students to keep in mind is to look for words and phrases that reveal the meaning or tone of a sentence. It’s easier for a student to choose the most appropriate answer options when they grasp the overall meaning of a sentence.

For example, the words “however” and “although” can be clues that the second part of a sentence conflicts with the first part. Take a look at this sentence: “The trial attorney was known for his grandiloquent speeches in the courtroom; however, his demeanor was ____ while spending time at home with his family.” The word “however” in the sentence should signal a student to look for an answer option that means the opposite of “grandiloquent.” Alternatively, a student who sees the words “moreover” or “similarly” in a sentence should bear in mind that these words indicate agreement.

Students looking for other useful GRE sentence completion tips may want to try coming up with a few words that would fit logically into a sentence. After thinking of a short list of words, students can peruse the answer options to find two words that are similar in meaning. Another technique to try as a student participates in GRE sentence equivalence practice is to cross out answer options that would definitely not fit in the sentence.

What Are Text Completion Questions?
GRE text completion questions measure how well students evaluate and interpret reading material. Each GRE text completion question features a short passage. There are one to three blank spaces within the passage, requiring a student to choose the best answer option for each one.

For instance, if there are three blanks in a passage, then a student will have three answer options per blank. Alternatively, if the passage consists of just a single sentence with one blank space, then the student will receive five answer options to choose from. In the end, a student should end up with a passage made up of logical sentences.

How to Master Text Completion Questions
The first step in a student’s approach to a text completion question should be to read the entire passage. This gives a student an idea of the tone and structure of the passage. The next step is to look for words in the passage that can help a student select the answer option that leads to logical sentence completion. GRE questions in this section challenge a student’s ability to consistently create coherent sentences. Some words to look for include “moreover,” “although,” and “however.”

When working on a text completion question, it’s not necessary for students to start with the first blank and finish by finding an answer option that fits the third blank. Sometimes, filling in the blanks out of order can simplify the process of determining the correct answers for each one.

Our staff at Veritas Prep stands ready to help students who want to put forth their best performance on the GRE. At Veritas Prep, we teach our students practical strategies that prepare them for the GRE. Furthermore, students who take advantage of our prep courses learn from instructors who’ve mastered the exam.

We provide expert guidance on all of the questions on this challenging test, including the ones that involve text and sentence completion. GRE courses are available to suit the busy schedules of our students. We give our students the tools they need to excel – contact Veritas Prep today and let us help you master the GRE!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

Getting Your GRE Scores

Letter of RecommendationMost students who plan to take the GRE have a number of questions about the exam. One of the most common questions is, “When will I receive my test scores?” Also, students want to know how to get GRE scores sent to the schools they are applying to. Other students want to find out about the sections and the scoring system on the GRE. Let’s look at the answers to these questions, along with others related to this important exam.

Test Sections and Scoring on the GRE
Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Analytical Writing are the three sections on the GRE. Questions in the Verbal Reasoning section measure a student’s skills in understanding and evaluating written material. The Quantitative Reasoning section contains geometry, algebra, arithmetic, and other basic math problems. The Analytical Writing section requires students to write an issue essay as well as an argument essay. These essays reveal a student’s critical thinking skills and ability to write in a clear, organized way.

Students can score from 130 to 170 points on the Verbal and Quantitative Reasoning sections. Scores for both of these sections are in one-point increments. Alternatively, students can earn from zero to six points on the Analytical Writing section of the GRE. This section is scored in half-point increments.

Getting GRE Scores
Before leaving the testing location, students who take the computer-delivered GRE have the opportunity to see their unofficial scores for the Verbal and Quantitative Reasoning sections. However, Analytical Writing scores are not available on test day – 10 to 15 days after test day, students can find out their official scores via the account they opened to register for the GRE. Alternatively, those who take the paper-delivered version of the GRE must wait six weeks before having access to their official test scores.

Students who prepare for the GRE with Veritas Prep are very likely to be happy with their test scores. Our students receive instruction from professional tutors who have taken the GRE with great success! Our instructors can offer students inside tips to help them conquer every test question. We also review practice test results with students so they can study in an efficient, logical way. At Veritas Prep, we combine first-rate instruction with excellent study resources to give our students the tools they need to get GRE scores they can be proud of.

Sending GRE Scores to Schools
Students headed to graduate school know the importance of getting GRE scores to the schools they want to apply to. A student who takes the computer-delivered version of the GRE will have their scores sent out to schools approximately 10 to 15 days after the testing date. Students who take the traditional paper version of the GRE will have their test scores sent to schools about six weeks after taking the test. All students receive a notification when their test scores have been sent out to the schools on their list.

How to Get GRE Scores Sent to Additional Schools
Students who register to take the exam can get GRE scores sent to as many as four schools – this is included in the test fee. But what if a student wants to send scores to more than four schools? Students can go online to order additional score reports or arrange for them via fax or mail. There is a fee for each additional score report.

Information Displayed on a Score Report
There are several pieces of information on a student’s score report. A student’s name and other basic contact information are on the report, as well as when the person took the GRE. A student’s GRE score and percentile rank are also on their score report. Score reports sent to schools feature a student’s contact information, test date, intended focus of study, GRE scores, and percentile rank.

At Veritas Prep, we offer a variety of tutoring options for the GRE so you can be satisfied with your score. We have both online and in-person courses available so students can choose the best study option for them. Our students receive the instruction and encouragement they need to earn their best possible score on the GRE!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

How to Effectively Prepare for the Analytical Writing Portion of the GRE

Keep Calm Write FastThe analytical writing section is one of the three parts of the GRE. Students are asked to write two different types of essays for this section. These essays reveal a student’s ability to understand what an author is conveying, organize ideas in a logical way, use specific examples to support their ideas, and write in a clear, concise manner. Let’s examine how to prepare for analytical writing, GRE essay tips, and more:

The Analytical Writing Section on the GRE
Students are required to write an issue essay and an argument essay for the GRE. For the issue essay, students must read a statement about a familiar topic. Then, they write an essay explaining whether they agree or disagree with the statement. Students should use specific examples to support their position.

For the argument essay, students must read and analyze an argument put forth by an author. Then, they write an essay proving that the argument is either logical or illogical based on specific examples from the text – the argument essay does not ask the student to agree or disagree with the author’s statement. It’s important for students to read the specific instructions that accompany both the issue and argument essays on the GRE.

Writing Practice Essays
There are several things students can do to prep for this section of the GRE. Analytical writing practice is very helpful for students who want to become more adept at creating both types of essays. It’s a good idea to start the process by making an outline that highlights the important points that a student wants to include in an essay. Then, a student can refer to the outline to stay on track while writing.

Students are given 30 minutes to write each of the essays for the GRE. Analytical writing practice should include using a timer to make sure that a student can finish writing an essay in the allotted amount of time. Of course, a student must factor in the time it takes to read the author’s statement, create an outline, and complete the essay itself. Getting the timing right can take some of the stress out of writing the essays on test day.

Examine Successful GRE Essays
Along with writing practice essays for the GRE, analytical writing preparation should include reading essays that received high scores on the exam. Students can look at the various components of these essays as well as how they are organized to get an idea of what test graders are looking for.

Some students may find it beneficial to use a high-scoring essay as a guide as they practice writing their own issue and argument essays. For many students, it’s useful to see the arrangement of ideas in these high-scoring essays. Often, students who write these successful essays follow a very simple outline that any student can use.

Learning New Vocabulary Words
Another important part of GRE analytical writing preparation is learning how to use appropriate words to get a point across in an essay. Students can expand their vocabulary by reading newspaper and magazine articles to become familiar with commonly used words and their definitions. Some students make flashcards to help them learn these new vocabulary words. In addition, a student has the opportunity to read well-crafted sentences in these types of publications.

Students can also benefit from looking at the vocabulary words used in essays that received high scores on the GRE. Even if students don’t use all of these newly-learned words in their GRE essays, they may use them in future assignments and papers written for graduate school courses. In short, it’s always beneficial for a student to add to their supply of vocabulary words.

At Veritas Prep, we teach our students how to prepare for analytical writing. GRE test-takers who study with us get the tools and confidence they need to write high-scoring essays. Each of our online GRE tutors earned an impressive score on the exam – this means we have the inside track on the analytical writing section, as well as every other section of the test! We teach students practical strategies that allow them to show off their essay-writing skills on the GRE. Contact our offices to sign up for one of our effective GRE prep classes today!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

GRE Data Interpretation Prep Tips

books_stackedOne of the three parts of the GRE is the Quantitative Reasoning section. This section includes questions that involve geometry, algebra, and basic arithmetic. It also challenges students with questions on data interpretation. GRE test-takers must examine a collection of data in order to answer these questions. Find out more about the data interpretation questions on the GRE here and learn some helpful tips on how to arrive at the correct answers. With our help, you can do your best on the test!

Data Interpretation Questions on the GRE
On the GRE, data interpretation problems feature many types of graphs, charts, diagrams, and tables. There are several questions that accompany each visual expression of data. The questions then delve into the different types of data revealed in the illustration. These math problems measure a student’s ability to understand and interpret the information shown on a graph or chart. Not surprisingly, students who are familiar with many types of graphs and charts are likely to perform well on these questions.

Tips for Answering GRE Data Interpretation Questions
One helpful tip to use when solving data interpretation problems is to take 30 seconds or so to review the information in the graph, chart, table, or diagram. Be on the lookout for measurements, amounts, units, or other labels that can help in the process of interpreting the data. Also, look at what is being calculated – one graph may use percentages to convey data, while another uses dollar figures. This brief review of the details on a graph or chart can help guide a student as they begin to consider the questions that follow.

Another tip is to estimate the numbers found in a chart or diagram in order to arrive at the correct answer. In some cases, amounts and other statistics may not be conveyed in round numbers – coming up with an estimate can lead a student to the correct answer. Eliminating answer options that are obviously wrong is another useful tip for students. This can be done after a student mentally predicts the answer. Narrowing down the number of possible answers can make GRE interpretation questions seem more manageable.

After choosing an answer, it’s a good idea for a student to think about whether the answer fits logically with the data that has been presented. If not, a student may want to mark the question and return to it later on in the test. Spending too much time on one puzzling question can prevent students from finishing the Quantitative Reasoning section in the allotted amount of time. Plus, it can help to take a few minutes to think about a question before approaching it for the second time.

Studying for the Data Interpretation Questions on the GRE
Completing a set of practice math problems is the best way to prep for the data interpretation questions in the Quantitative Reasoning section. A practice test gives students the opportunity to sample the types of data interpretation questions that they will encounter on the actual test. Also, the results of a practice test allow students to see where they need to improve.

Becoming familiar with different types of graphs, diagrams, and charts is another way to prepare for data interpretation questions on the GRE. GRE interpretation questions may contain bar graphs, line graphs, box plots, scatter plots, and circle graphs along with others. Having knowledge of these figures will give a student the tools they need to interpret any set of data, regardless of how it’s presented.

At Veritas Prep, we provide expert tutoring to students who are preparing for the GRE. Our professional instructors have all earned high scores on the exam, which means they are uniquely qualified to help students prepare for the test. We offer online and in-person courses with which students can get the tools they need to ace data interpretation questions. Our instructors are there to answer students’ questions and give them some encouragement along the way.

We are proud to guide students toward their best scores on questions that involve data interpretation. GRE test-takers can rely on our tutoring services to assist them in preparing for these questions, along with all of the others on the exam. At Veritas Prep, we combine superb tutoring with excellent study resources to provide students with top-quality GRE preparation. Contact our offices today!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

GRE Physics Prep Solutions and Study Guide

GoalsThe GRE physics subject test is for students who plan to study this subject in graduate school. The results of this test can help graduate school officials determine a student’s course of study in the area of physics. GRE prep is necessary when students want to showcase their full range of knowledge on this subject. Look at the material on the GRE physics test and find out how to prep for it.

What Is On the GRE Physics Test?
The GRE physics subject test has 100 questions. Each of those questions has five answer options to choose from. Students encounter many different topics on the exam. Questions on classical mechanics make up 20 percent of the test – dynamics of systems of particles, three-dimensional particle dynamics, Newton’s laws, and kinematics are just a few of the topics that relate to classical mechanics.

Other topics on the physics test include electromagnetism, optics and wave phenomena, thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, atomic physics, special relativity, and laboratory methods. Nine percent of the test is devoted to specialized topics such as nuclear and particle physics, condensed matter, astrophysics, and computer applications.

Math on the GRE Physics Test
As a student studies for the test in physics, GRE prep should include a review of mathematical methods used in physics. Some of the questions on the test require students to know how to apply these methods. Coordinate systems, partial differential equations, boundary value problems, and multivariate calculus are a few examples of math topics that students should be familiar with for the test.

The Scoring System for the Physics Test
Before starting to follow any physics GRE study guide, students must be familiar with the scoring system for the test, as it is different from the system for the general GRE. Students can score between 200 and 990 points on the GRE physics test – the test is scored in ten-point increments. A score report displays a student’s test score as well as the person’s percentile ranking. Students’ scores are valid for five years from the year they take the test.

GRE Physics Preparation Tips
For students taking the GRE, physics preparation should begin with a practice test. The results of the practice test will give students an indication of what skills they need to work on. Plus, taking a timed practice test allows students to set a reasonable pace that allows them to finish the entire test in the allotted 170 minutes.

It’s also a good idea for students to review the material they learned in physics courses in undergraduate school. This includes textbooks, course notes, and assignments. As students move through a physics GRE study guide, they should remember that test questions are based on material learned in undergraduate physics classes. Students who set aside several months for GRE physics preparation are giving themselves an advantage – they are able to study in a way that allows them to fully absorb the necessary material.

Achieving Success on the GRE Physics Test
Students gain an advantage on the GRE physics test when they tackle the easiest questions first. This helps to build their confidence as they go back to work on the more puzzling test questions. Plus, this tactic prevents students from wasting a lot of valuable time on a single challenging problem.

Eliminating answers that are obviously wrong is another simple thing students can do as they work through the test. Narrowing the number of answer choices makes the process of finding the correct option a little bit easier. Working out problems on a piece of scratch paper can also be helpful to students as they move through the physics test. Sometimes, the correct answer seems more apparent when a student sees all of the work in front of them.

At Veritas Prep, we provide effective GRE tutoring services. Students have the opportunity to work with tutors who have achieved great success on the GRE. Consequently, students can get the inside track on what they need to know about the test. We help students who are looking for physics GRE solutions! We are also experts at preparing students for the GRE via our online and in-person courses, and we teach students strategies that they can use on every test question. For students who are studying physics, GRE solutions are readily available at Veritas Prep!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

How to Write an Effective Argument Essay for the GRE

EssayThe Graduate Record Examination, or GRE, has three sections. One of those sections measures a student’s analytical writing skills. For this section, students are required to write both an issue essay and an argument essay. GRE graders look closely at the evidence included in a student’s argument essay as well as the organization of all of the various components. Learn what an argument essay is and get some tips on how to write an outstanding one for the GRE.

What Is the GRE Argument Essay?
The argument essay on the GRE requires students to evaluate an argument put forth by an author. A student’s job is to examine the author’s reasoning and evidence as well as the overall organization of the argument.

Ultimately, a student must decide whether the author’s argument is logical. If a student decides that the author’s argument is illogical, then they must give specific reasons to support that analysis. For example, a student may point out unanswered questions or faulty pieces of evidence in the argument. Alternatively, if a student decides that an author’s argument is logical, then they must offer evidence supporting that analysis.

When writing this essay, students should not reveal whether they agree or disagree with the author’s argument. Furthermore, students should not share their views on the subject being discussed. The purpose of this essay is to reveal a student’s skills in analyzing and evaluating an argument.

Tips for Writing GRE Argument Essays
There are many useful tips that can help students write an excellent argument essay. GRE test-takers may want to begin by jotting down notes on a scrap piece of paper as they read the author’s argument. The few minutes that a student dedicates to taking these notes can ensure that they include all of the important points in the final essay.

Students should always read the instructions paired with each GRE argument task before starting to write. Not every argument essay has the same set of instructions – for example, some instructions require students to focus on an author’s assumptions, while others ask that students focus on unanswered questions in the argument. These are just two examples out of many types of instructions given to students tackling the GRE argument essay. It’s also a wise idea for a student to draft an outline for the essay before beginning to write it. Following an outline can increase the clarity and organization of an argument essay.

Our GRE courses at Veritas Prep provide students with the tools and strategies they need to craft a notable argument essay. Our instructors have taken and mastered the GRE, enabling them to pass on valuable tips to students. We offer several tutoring options, including online and in-person instruction, to make GRE preparation as convenient as possible for our busy students.`

Preparing for the Argument Essay
Most students want to do everything they can to write a clear, organized argument essay. GRE prep should include essay-writing practice. Students can write a practice argument essay, then dissect it sentence by sentence to make sure it contains all of the necessary elements. As a note, the GRE gives students 30 minutes to write an argument essay, so it’s a good idea for students to time themselves when they complete their practice essays. That way, they know how much time they can spend on making notes, drafting an outline, and writing the essay.

It’s also helpful for students to study essays that received a high score on the GRE. An outstanding argument essay contains vocabulary words that add to the clarity of the writing. Students can expand their supply of vocabulary words by reading online articles, newspapers, and magazines. They may want to jot down some words commonly used in these publications. Flashcards are helpful study tools for students who are learning unfamiliar words and their definitions.

Our instructors can teach students how to write a GRE argument essay. We offer practical advice and guidance that students can use as they move through the steps of writing a convincing essay. Also, our instructors give valuable encouragement to students to help them have a confident mindset on test day. Contact Veritas Prep today and let us help you boost your essay-writing skills!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

Firm Up Your Vocab Skills for the GRE: The Most Common GRE Words

Test PrepThere are many things that students must do to prep for the Verbal Reasoning section of the GRE. Becoming familiar with vocabulary words used on the GRE as well as their definitions can help students to master many Verbal Reasoning questions. Fortunately, students have several options when it comes to studying the most common GRE words. Consider some creative ways that students can become familiar with vocabulary words used on the GRE:

Word Games
Many students find online word games helpful as they prepare for the GRE. It may be a simple matching game that asks students to pair GRE vocabulary words with their definitions. Or it could be a more familiar game, such as Hangman, that incorporates words seen in Verbal Reasoning questions. Some students like to play online word games with a friend. Competition can make the process of absorbing new words more fun. Plus, a friend can offer encouragement and support that can push a student to learn even more words for the test.

Memorable Sentences
Creating memorable sentences is another way for students to learn high-frequency words for GRE questions. For instance, a student can bring in personal experience when creating a sentence for the word “indelible”: “My mother was angry when my little sister wrote on her bedroom wall with indelible marker.” The student is more likely to remember the definition of the word “indelible” because they created a sentence based on something that happened in their family. Plus, the act of writing sentences on paper further helps a student absorb words and their definitions.

Veritas Prep tutors are experts at helping students prepare for the GRE because we hire tutors who excelled on this exam. In our courses, we give students valuable tips like these for how to learn high-frequency words for GRE questions. Because our students learn test strategies from professionals who have practical experience with the GRE, they get the tools they need to succeed.

Reviewing Flash Cards
Flash cards are effective study tools for students who are learning the most common GRE words. Some students like to make traditional flash cards using a marker and index cards. They write the vocabulary word on one side of the card and its definition on the other. Other students prefer to find an app for GRE flash cards that they can access via their smartphone.

Either way, students can review their flash cards during free moments throughout their day. This can increase the total number of GRE words a student can learn per week. Students can also enlist the help of friends as they review flash cards – a friend can hold up a flash card and ask the student for the definition of the word. Reviewing flash cards with a friend can make study time more effective.

Using New Words on School Assignments
The next study method is perfect for undergraduate students who plan to take the GRE. High-frequency words found on the test can be incorporated into daily assignments for classes. For instance, a student might use several GRE vocabulary words while writing a paper for a literature class, or an individual can use GRE words to complete the essay section on an exam for a history class. Including GRE vocabulary in assignments gives a student additional practice with these words and may even impress a professor or two!

Additional Reading Material
Putting in some extra time reading is another way to prepare for the GRE. High-frequency words seen on the test can sometimes be found in newspapers, nonfiction books, and magazines. Science and news magazines are especially useful for students learning GRE vocabulary. Some classic novels also contain many GRE words. Reading these types of materials gives a student the opportunity to see GRE vocabulary used in context. Once again, this boosts the chances that a student will remember the word when they see it on the test.

Our team of instructors at Veritas Prep knows how to guide students toward success on the GRE. For the convenience of our students, we offer both online and in-person prep courses. We can help students increase their supply of GRE words so they can excel on Verbal Reasoning questions. Our talented instructors address the specific needs of each student. Contact our offices today!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

Important GRE Math Formulas to Know Going Into the Exam

Pi to the 36th digitThe Quantitative Reasoning section is just one of three parts of the GRE. In this section, students must answer algebra, arithmetic, geometry, and data analysis questions. In order to prep for this section of the test, students must take time to learn some GRE math formulas, as these formulas aren’t provided on the test. Check out some examples of math formulas for GRE questions and get some tips on how to master this section of the exam.

Examples of GRE Math Formulas

  • Slope-intercept: y = mx + b
  • Distance = Rate * Time or D = RT
  • Average Speed = Total Distance/Total Time
  • For squares: Perimeter = 4s (side); Area = s2
  • For rectangles: Area = Length * Width or A= lw; Perimeter= 2l + 2w
  • For polygons: Total degrees = 180(n-2), where n = the number of sides
  • For circles: Area = πr2 , Circumference = 2πr

Tips for the Quantitative Section
As a student works through this portion of the test, it’s helpful to scan through the answer options and eliminate those that are clearly incorrect. Crossing out these options helps to make a math problem more manageable for a student. Plus, the student doesn’t have to waste time considering answer options that are definitely not going to work.

A second tip is to work problems out on scrap paper. This is especially beneficial when working on word problems – a student is able to see all of the parts of a problem without having to mentally juggle a lot of figures. Furthermore, if a student arrives at an answer that doesn’t match up with any of the options, they can go back to the work on the scrap paper to find the mistake.

Students may want to get into the habit of estimating the answer before considering any of the answer options. This gives the student a rough idea of what the answer looks like before choosing the official solution from the multiple options.

In order to save test time, it’s also a good idea for students to skip extremely puzzling questions and return to them later on in the test period. A student who spends too much time on one problem in the quantitative reasoning section is likely to run out of time before finishing the rest of the section. Students who take the computer-delivered version of the GRE are able to use a convenient “mark and review” tool that helps them to remember the questions that were skipped and go back to them.

Studying for the Quantitative Section
Memorizing math formulas for GRE questions is just one of the effective ways to study for the GRE. Working on practice math problems is another way to prep for the test. This gives a student the opportunity to practice using those math formulas. As they work through a variety of problems, students can become familiar with when to use a particular GRE math formula.

Some students find it helpful to make flash cards with math formulas on them. They can quiz themselves by holding up a flash card with a GRE math formula on it. Next, the student should successfully complete a problem using that formula.

Online math games are another study tool used by many students. Games can be a fun way for students to refresh their algebra skills or get reacquainted with the rules of geometry. Some students like to pair with another person to play these types of math games. Competing with a friend to see who can score more points and end up with more correct answers can be motivating to many students who plan to take the GRE. Plus, it’s always helpful to hear encouraging words from a friend.

All of our GRE instructors at Veritas Prep have taken the exam and achieved impressive scores. They are familiar with the subtleties of this challenging test. In short, our students learn from instructors who know what it takes to master the Quantitative Reasoning section as well as the other sections on the GRE. Our instructors help students to learn the math formulas they need to know to take on the test with confidence. We offer in-person and online courses in which students can get test-taking strategies from the experts. Contact Veritas Prep today!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

Building Your Perfect GRE Prep Schedule: A Study Schedule Students Can Use to Excel

Six WeeksHow long does it take to prepare for the GRE? The answer to this question depends on the person who is taking the test. A student who is just finishing undergraduate school may need just a few weeks to prepare. Alternatively, someone who has been out of college for several years may need to study for three or four months. Regardless of how long a person studies, a GRE prep schedule can make study time all the more effective.

Let’s look at some tips that can help students create a study schedule that paves the way to success on the GRE:

Before Making a GRE Preparation Schedule
Before jumping in and making a study schedule for GRE success, it’s a good idea for students to take a practice test. Taking a practice GRE gives students the chance to become familiar with the format of the test. Also, they get to experience the types of questions they will encounter in all three sections.

Most importantly, students can refer to the results of their practice test as they set up their GRE preparation schedule. One student may see that they need to improve their performance on the Analytical Writing Section of the test – perhaps they need to work on including more specific evidence in their essays. Another student may discover that they need to focus on learning more vocabulary words for sentence equivalence questions in the Verbal Reasoning Section. Students can use their practice test results to prioritize what they need to study in order to submit their best performance on the GRE.

Making a Study Plan That Works
There is not a one-size-fits-all study schedule for GRE students. One person’s full-time work schedule may not allow them to study until six o’clock in the evening. Another person may have to study early in the morning due to a full schedule of undergraduate courses. In short, each person has to craft a study schedule that fits with their daily commitments.

Sample GRE Study Schedules
One student may decide to study for three hours per day, five days a week. If they want to focus on verbal reasoning skills, they could dedicate the first hour on Monday to practicing reading comprehension skills, such as summarizing written passages and drawing conclusions. They could use the second hour to memorize new vocabulary words using flash cards. The third hour could be spent practicing sentence equivalence questions. This student could plan to spend three days a week studying for the Verbal Reasoning Section and two days preparing for the Quantitative Section of the test.

Another student may create a GRE prep schedule that involves two hours of study time per day, six days a week. This student wants to concentrate on sharpening their quantitative reasoning skills, so they spend three days a week studying algebra, geometry, and data analysis problems. They might dedicate two days to verbal reasoning study and one day to analytical writing practice.

It’s a wise idea for students to write each day’s study activities on a calendar so they know exactly what they are doing every time they sit down to prep for the GRE. At Veritas Prep, no matter what your schedule looks like or what topics you need to focus on, we provide GRE tutoring designed to meet the specific needs of each student. We help students learn how to study in the most efficient way possible. In addition, we hire professional instructors who excelled on the GRE. We want our students to benefit from the knowledge and experience of their instructors!

Checking Progress Along the Way
It’s important for students to review their progress as they continue to move through their GRE preparation schedule. After two or three weeks of study, students should take another practice GRE to see if their skills have improved. In many cases, a student will find that they have mastered a particular skill. This means the student can adjust their study schedule to dedicate more time to skills that still need work.

Our online tutors at Veritas Prep are experts at providing instruction, guidance, and encouragement to students who are preparing for the GRE. We can advise students on their study schedules and offer tips that can make them more efficient. Contact Veritas Prep today and let us help you study for the GRE!

GRE Results: Analyzing Your GRE Test Results

Magnifying GlassMost students put a lot of time and effort into preparing for the GRE – not surprisingly, these students are anxious to see their test results. The typical GRE score report contains a lot of information regarding a student’s performance on the GRE.

Discover what is included on a student’s GRE report and the meaning behind this information:

Basic Information Contained in GRE Test Results
A student’s basic information can be found at the top of their GRE results sheet. This includes the person’s name, address, email, phone number, partial Social Security number, birth date, and gender. Also, the report notes a student’s intended focus of study in graduate school. If a student takes the general GRE, then those scores will be on their report – if the student took a GRE subject test, then those scores will be on the report, as well.

Points Possible on the GRE
In order for students to interpret their GRE test results, they have to know the number of points possible for each section of the test. The GRE has three parts: the Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Analytical Writing sections. For the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning sections of the test, the scoring scale is 130 to 170 points. These two sections of the test are scored in one-point increments. Students can earn from zero to six points on the Analytical Writing section of the GRE. This section is scored in half-point increments.

To get the most points possible on the GRE, get help from Veritas Prep: Our students benefit from working with an experienced tutor as they prepare for this exam. We hire talented instructors who aced the GRE, so students are able to practice effective test-taking strategies with instructors who have actual experience with the test. We teach our students how to approach every question on the GRE with confidence.

Scores on a GRE Report
Students receive raw scores for the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning sections of the test. A raw score represents the number of questions that a student got right. A student’s raw score is then turned into a scaled score. Little variations in the difficulty between different editions of the test are taken into account to compute a student’s scaled scores.

As for a student’s Analytical Writing score, each essay receives two scores – one score is given by a human grader trained to evaluate essays, and the other score is given by a computer program designed to evaluate essays. The average of these two scores is the final score assigned to the essay. As a side-note, if the human grader’s score and the computer’s score are radically different, then the essay is re-scored by two human graders.

Percentile Rank
Students looking at their GRE results online will notice a section that includes percentile ranks. Percentiles compare a student’s performance with others who took the GRE. For instance, say a student has a percentile rank of 80 for the Verbal Reasoning portion of the test. This means that 80 percent of the individuals who took the exam scored lower on that section than that student. Students are given a percentile rank for each of the three sections of the GRE. This particular GRE result can be helpful for students who are still deciding which schools to apply to.

School Admissions and GRE Results
As students analyze their GRE results online, they should pay close attention to the requirements of the schools they want to apply to. Many universities and colleges post the average GRE scores of the students they accept, which can serve as a guide for students who want to know what type of score they have to achieve in order to be accepted into their preferred school.

Some schools also post the average GRE scores of students studying in specific programs. For instance, a student who wants to go to Harvard could research what GRE score they need to achieve in order to get into the Physics program, the Sociology program, or another program at the school.

At Veritas Prep, we provide valuable instruction that helps students obtain their best possible GRE results. We combine skillful teaching with invaluable resources to give our students every advantage on the test. Our online GRE prep courses are perfect for busy undergraduate students or individuals with full-time careers. Contact our offices today!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

Can I Take the GRE Online?

GMAT“Can I take the GRE online?” This is just one of the many questions that students have about the GRE exam – they wonder if perhaps they can take the GRE online from home or at their local library. Although many GRE practice tests can be taken online, the actual exam itself must be taken in an official testing center. Taking the GRE under the guidance of an administrator in one of these testing centers helps ensure the integrity of the test results.

Consider some of the ways that a student can take the GRE in a testing center and learn more about the contents of this challenging exam:

Ways to Take the GRE
Although students are not allowed to take the GRE online from home, they can take the test on a computer in a testing center. In fact, most students choose to take the GRE via computer rather than take it as a traditional paper test (which is also an option – instead of sitting down at a computer, students receive a test booklet where they mark down their answers). Both the computer-based exam and the paper-delivered test take over three hours to complete.

Benefits of Taking the Computer-Delivered GRE
There are lots of students who feel at ease taking the GRE on a computer because they are very familiar with the technology. Unlike its counterpart, the GMAT (which is also taken via computer), the computer-delivered GRE allows test-takers to mark questions they want to skip and return to them later on, as well as to go back and change answers within a particular section.

The computer that the GRE is administered on has basic word processing software that allows students to cut, paste, and otherwise edit their essays – many test-takers appreciate being able to type their essays for the test in this way instead of having to hand-write them. Test-takers also get to use an on-screen calculator for problems in the Quantitative Reasoning Section. The computer-delivered exam is the next best option for students who wish they could take the GRE online.

Benefits of Taking the Paper-Delivered GRE
Some students prefer to stick with the paper-based format for the GRE as they feel more comfortable with this familiar, traditional option. Like the computer-delivered version of the exam, the paper GRE allows test-takers to skip puzzling questions and return to them later on. It also gives them the ability to jot down outlines for their essays to use in hand-writing their final versions. Not surprisingly, this is the preferred option for students who would never want to take the GRE online.

What Is On the GRE?
Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Analytical Writing Sections make up the three parts of the GRE. The Verbal Reasoning Section tests a student’s ability to read and understand written works as well as recognize various vocabulary words in context. The Quantitative Section tests a student’s math skills in the areas of arithmetic, geometry, algebra, and data interpretation. Finally, on the Analytical Writing Section, students are asked to write both an issue essay as well as an argument essay.

Tips for GRE Preparation
Whether a student is taking the GRE via computer or on paper, it’s a good idea to take a practice test. This can help a student to learn which skills need the most attention while they are studying. For example, a student looking at the results of their practice GRE may find that although they performed well on most of the math problems, they would benefit from a little work on their geometry skills. This information will allow the student to focus their study efforts where they are most needed.

Another tip that can assist students in preparing for the GRE is to read more newspaper and magazine articles. This habit can help a student absorb commonly-used vocabulary words and their definitions, which will come in handy if they see these words during the Verbal Reasoning Section of the exam.

At Veritas Prep, we are experts at helping students prepare for the GRE. Each of our professional instructors has achieved a GRE high score, which means that students who take our courses learn test-taking strategies from instructors who have navigated the test with great success!

Though test-takers can’t take the GRE online, they can still gain an advantage over their peers by studying with one of our expert instructors at Veritas Prep. We use excellent study materials and resources to make sure our students have the confidence they need to perform at their best on test day.

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

What is Considered a “Good” GRE Score and How is it Achieved?

GMATWhat is considered to be a “good” GRE score? This is a common question that often comes to mind for students who are planning to take the GRE. Most of them want an idea as to what scores they will need to have in order to gain admission to their preferred graduate schools. Furthermore, students also want to know the best way they can work to achieve this good GRE score.

At Veritas Prep, we know that thorough preparation is the only way to truly master the GRE, and Veritas Prep students benefit when they study with instructors who have achieved great success on this test. What is a good GRE score? Veritas Prep has the answer.

What is Considered a Good GRE Score?
Students who take the Revised GRE exam receive a report that displays their scores and other information – there are three scores on this report instead of just one, as students receive separate scores for their performance on the Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative, and Analytical Writing Sections of the test. They can score between 130 and 170 points on the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Sections, and anywhere from 0 to 6 points on the Analytical Writing Section.

Scores for the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Sections are measured in one-point increments while Analytical Writing scores accumulate in half-point increments. Therefore, a score of about 160 is considered to be good for the Verbal Reasoning Section, a score of around 164 is good for the Quantitative Section, and a score of 5 is good for the the Analytical Writing Section.

Students can also look at the specific admissions requirements of the schools they are considering. The question then becomes, “What is a good GRE score for incoming graduate students at a particular university?” This answer will vary from school to school, so it is best to research the average GRE scores of the schools you are applying to so you can have a target score in mind.

Also, keep in mind that the old version of the GRE used a different scoring scale for the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative sections of the exam (students began taking the revised GRE on August 1, 2011). The scores for both the old and the revised versions of the GRE are valid for five years after a student takes the test.

GRE Practice Tests
During GRE prep courses at Veritas Prep, we examine the results of a student’s practice tests, and these results help us to determine where a student needs to improve. Our professional instructors are experts at providing tips to students on how they can strengthen various skills for the GRE. Taking practice tests can help students gauge their progress as they improve in their performance on all three sections of the exam – in a way, a practice test also serves as a sneak preview of what a student will see on test day.

Learn Effective Strategies to Use on the GRE
Students who work with Veritas Prep instructors learn simple test-taking strategies that can end up being their most valuable resources on test day. For instance, they learn how to simplify complicated math equations on the Quantitative Section, how to eliminate answer options to narrow their choices and solve problems with efficiency, and what to look for as they read passages in the Verbal Reasoning Section.

A student who practices these strategies will be able to move through the test and complete all of their questions without running out of time. We also show students how to plan out an organized essay for the Analytical Writing Section of the exam (taking the time to create an outline will pay off in building a convincing argument).

Building Confidence While Preparing for the Test
One of the most important things we do at Veritas Prep is offer encouragement to our students. We know that taking the GRE in preparation for graduate school can be stressful, and we’ve found that most students tend to favor one section of the GRE over another simply because they are more comfortable with the subject matter. We partner with students to improve their performance in weak areas and push them to greater success in the areas in which they already excel.

Students who want to achieve great GRE scores can contact us or consult our FAQ page for more information about our services. We are the experts when it comes to giving students the guidance and strategies they need to perform at their best on the GRE.

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

Why Take a Language Test in Addition to the GMAT or GRE?

FAQMany international applicants are curious as to why graduate schools require an English language test along with the GMAT or the GRE. The latter tests are quite challenging and are already conducted in English, so why take TOEFL or IELTS, in addition?

Well, the reason is actually quite simple. Although the GMAT and GRE are administered in English, they do not truly test language proficiency.

Language vs. Aptitude Tests
Test-takers should be fluent in English to take GMAT and GRE, but these exams are just reasoning tests. The GMAT and GRE measure your aptitude for graduate school success by assessing your analytical thinking, quantitative skills, comprehension of complex texts, ability to identify arguments, etc.

These tests do require fluency in English because this is the language of the test. As such, you will need to brush-up your knowledge of standard English grammar and upgrade your vocabulary to an academic level to cope with the Verbal Sections and the Analytical Writing assessments. In addition, the GMAT and GRE will both require a refresher of high school and college math skills.

What language skills do you use on the GMAT and GRE?
1) Reading Comprehension
Both the GRE and GMAT are conducted entirely in English, so you should be able to comprehend all instructions and test questions, as well as be able to read quickly and understand what you are reading in detail.

The vocabulary in some parts of these tests can be at a very high academic level, or can be highly specialized in a certain field. On the GMAT, for example, you can find texts about history, biology and chemistry with very specific terminology. Don’t be surprised – the GMAT opens the door to business school, which prepares future managers. Managers have to be able to make decisions in any industry, not necessarily knowing all the details and terminology in the field.

Reading long, specialized text is essential for success in graduate school, but the GMAT and GRE do not test other equally important language skills such as your listening, comprehension and speaking abilities.

2) Applying Grammar Rules
Mastery of grammar rules and having an experienced eye for tiny details is essential for the Verbal Sections of the GRE and GMAT. Your grammar expertise will help you with, for example, GMAT Sentence Correction questions. Let’s look at how you can work on this using the following practice question; you have to choose which of the five answer choices is correct in order to replace the underlined part of the sentence:

SARS coronavirus – the virus that causes Sudden Acute Respiratory Syndrome – does not seem to transmit easily from person to person, though in China it has infected the family members and health care personnel taking care of them.

(A) it has infected the family members and health care personnel taking care of them
(B) it has infected the family members and health care personnel who had taken care of them
(C) the virus has infected the family members and health care personnel who have taken care of them
(D) the virus had infected the family members and health care personnel who took care of victims
E) it has infected the family members and health care personnel taking care of victims

Can you see how having a knowledge of grammar rules and a decision-point strategy can help you find the right answer? Veritas Prep experts explain:

In the original sentence, you will probably not notice the error with “them” at the end until you see the choice of “victims” in (D) and (E). The “them” in (A), (B), and (C) has no antecedent in the sentence. When you say “has infected THE family members and health personnel taking care of them” you need to have something for “them” to refer back to (it is not referring to family members or health personnel as that would be illogical – they are THE people doing the taking care of). In (D) the past perfect “had infected” is illogical as the virus did not infect the people BEFORE they took care of the people with the virus (the victims). (E) gets everything correct – it uses the proper, logical tense and uses “victims” instead of “them”. Answer is (E).

3) Writing and Style
Both the GMAT and the GRE have writing components. For the GRE, you are required to write two essays – Analysis of an Argument and Analysis of a Statement. The GMAT has only one essay – Analysis of the Argument. Although the focus of this part of the test is on your analytical skills, your presentation, use of correct grammar, level of vocabulary, structure and writing style will also count towards your score.

What language skills do the TOEFL and IELTS test?
The TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) and IELTS (International English Language Testing System) are the most well-known English proficiency tests required by universities. Although there are a number of differences between these tests, they both check all English language skills. In this way, university Admissions Committees make sure that prospective applicants can freely communicate in English in an academic environment, as well as make the most of their extracurricular activities and social life while at school.

The TOEFL and IELTS both assess:

1) Listening Comprehension
During these tests, you will listen to recordings of native speakers talking about different topics. Some of them are related to university life, such as lectures, class discussions, and talks between professors and students or among students. These tests reflect the variety of native English accents around the world, just as most of the international university classrooms do.

2) Reading Comprehension
You will have to read (within a specified time) large chunks of text on different topics. Vocabulary is at an academic level here, and the topics are from various fields of study and everyday situations. Your understanding of these texts will be verified in different ways.

3) Grammar
As with the GMAT and GRE, you will have questions that require a mastery of standard English grammar. You will have to find the best answer for certain Verbal questions, or decide whether a sentence is correct or incorrect (and how to correct it).

4) Writing
Both the IELTS and TOEFL exams have a written section. During this part of the test, you will have to write an essay – vocabulary used, clarity of expression, grammar, style, structure and focus on the topic are all considered in evaluating your essay.

5) Speaking
Oral communication is essential in graduate school, especially when the teaching methodology focuses on class discussion, group projects, presentations, and networking. While the Oral Section tests listening comprehension again, its primary purpose is to assess your ability to express yourself orally. For the TOEFL exam, the Oral Section, like the rest of the test, is carried out on a computer – you will listen to the instructions and then record your oral presentation. For the IELTS exam, your oral ability is assessed though a live, face-to-face conversation with the examiners.

Can language tests be waived?
Some universities will waive the requirement for a language test for international applicants who have recently completed a Bachelor’s Degree course studied entirely in English. In rare cases, some business schools will not require applicants to take the IELTS or TOEFL, since they will have the chance to evaluate candidates’ language skills during the admissions interview. This does not mean that all schools requiring an admission interview will waive the TOEFL/IELTS requirement, however, so it is best to check with the schools you are applying to for their policies on the matter.

Now you can clearly see how these two types of tests differ, and why most universities and business schools require both an aptitude test (the GMAT and GRE) and a language proficiency test. Admissions Committees require evidence that you have the potential to succeed with your studies, and that neither your language nor reasoning skills will be barriers.

By Iliana Bobova, from our partners at PrepAdviser.

Getting ready to take the GMAT? We have free online GMAT seminars running all the time. And, be sure to follow us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+, and Twitter!

Jump-Start Your GRE Prep With a Free GRE Strategy Session

GREWhether you are planning to apply to business school, pursue another field of graduate study, or simply want to keep your future options open, you’ve decided to take the GRE. The GRE is a challenging exam and if you are planning on taking the test, you undoubtedly have questions about how to prepare and how to maximize your score.

If you’re looking to jump-start your GRE preparation, register to attend Veritas Prep’s free online GRE Strategy Session. Hosted by Veritas Prep’s GRE Course co-creator, Brian Galvin, this one-hour session will go over the basics of the GRE and show you some of the advanced strategies needed to tackle this exam. In addition, each session concludes with a Q&A session, so you can have your toughest GRE questions answered in live time.

So what are you waiting for? Register to attend the next Veritas Prep GRE Strategy Session now and improve your chances of GRE success!

Wednesday, February 24
7:30pm – 8:30pm (Eastern)

Wednesday, March 23
8:00pm – 9:00pm (Eastern)

Register now!

Want a more focused approach to your GRE preparation? Check out our GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

4 Predictions for 2016: Trends to Look for in the Coming Year

Can you believe another year has already gone by? It seems like just yesterday that we were taking down 2014’s holiday decorations and trying to remember to write “2015” when writing down the date. Well, 2015 is now in the books, which means it’s time for us to stick our necks out and make a few predictions for what 2016 will bring in the world of college and graduate school testing and admissions. We don’t always nail all of our predictions, and sometimes we’re way off, but that’s what makes this predictions business kind of fun, right?

Let’s see how we do this year… Here are four things that we expect to see unfold at some point in 2016:

The College Board will announce at least one significant change to the New SAT after it is introduced in March.
Yes, we know that an all-new SAT is coming. And we also know that College Board CEO David Coleman is determined to make his mark and launch a new test that is much more closely aligned with the Common Core standards that Coleman himself helped develop before stepping into the CEO role at the College Board. (The changes also happen to make the New SAT much more similar to the ACT, but we digress.) The College Board’s excitement to introduce a radically redesigned test, though, may very well lead to some changes that need some tweaking after the first several times the new test is administered. We don’t know exactly what the changes will be, but the new test’s use of “Founding Documents” as a source of reading passages is one spot where we won’t be shocked to see tweaks later in 2016.

At least one major business school rankings publication will start to collect GRE scores from MBA programs.
While the GRE is still a long way from catching up to the GMAT as the most commonly submitted test score by MBA applicants, it is gaining ground. In fact, 29 of Bloomberg Businessweek‘s top 30 U.S. business schools now let applicants submit a score from either exam. Right now, no publication includes GRE score data in its ranking criteria, which creates a small but meaningful implication: if you’re not a strong standardized test taker, then submitting a GRE score may mean that an admissions committee will be more willing to take a chance and admit you (assuming the rest of your application is strong), since it won’t have to report your test score and risk lowering its average GMAT score.

Of course, when a school admits hundreds of applicants, the impact of your one single score is very small, but no admissions director wants to have to explain to his or her boss why the school admitted someone with a 640 GMAT score while all other schools’ average scores keep going up. Knowing this incentive is in place, it’s only a matter of time before Businessweek, U.S. News, or someone else starts collecting GRE scores from business schools for their rankings data.

An expansion of student loan forgiveness is coming.
It’s an election year, and not many issues have a bigger financial impact on young voters than student loan debt. The average Class of 2015 college grad was left school owing more than $35,000 in student loans, meaning that these young grads may have to work until the age of 75 until they can reasonably expect to retire. Already this year the government announced the Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE) Plan, which lets borrowers cap their monthly loan payments at 10% of their monthly discretionary income. One possible way the program could expand is by loosening the standards of the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program. Right now a borrower needs to make on-time monthly payments for 10 straight years to be eligible; don’t be surprised if someone proposes shortening it to five or eight years.

The number of business schools using video responses in their applications will triple.
Several prominent business schools such as Kellogg, Yale SOM, and U. of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management (which pioneered the practice) have started using video “essays” in their application process. While the rollout hasn’t been perfectly smooth, and many applicants have told us that video responses make the process even more stressful, we think video is’t going away anytime soon. In fact, we think that closer to 10 schools will use video as part of the application process by this time next year.

If a super-elite MBA program such as Stanford GSB or Harvard Business School starts video responses, then you will probably see a full-blown stampede towards video. But, even without one of those names adopting it, we think the medium’s popularity will climb significantly in the coming year. It’s just such a time saver for admissions officers – one can glean a lot about someone with just a few minutes of video – that this trend will only accelerate in 2016.

Let’s check back in 12 months and see how we did. In the meantime, we wish you a happy, healthy, and successful 2016!

By Scott Shrum

Should I Retake the GRE?

studying_GRECan you retake the GRE? This is one of the many questions we hear from our students at Veritas Prep. Even if a student hasn’t yet taken the test, they want to know if there is an option to improve on a score. The simple answer to that question is yes. But this leads to another important question: “Should I retake the GRE?”

At Veritas Prep, we offer thorough prep courses online that provide students with valuable strategies to help them to perform well on the GRE. Take a look at some information that students should keep in mind as they decide whether to retake the GRE.

Should I Retake the GRE?

Students who retake the GRE must pay the substantial test fee a second time and invest more hours and effort into the preparation process. So it’s a good idea for a student to have several solid reasons before retaking the GRE. One example of a valid reason for retaking the test is that the student was ill on test day. If a student was suffering from the flu or a bad cold and had a lot of trouble focusing on the test questions, these circumstances could lead the student to earn low scores on the GRE.

Another valid reason for retaking the GRE is a lack of preparation. If a student takes the GRE without completing any practice tests or dedicating any time to study, the student could earn very low scores due to this lack of preparation. If a student can take the test under different circumstances or make specific changes that affect test performance, then it’s worth it to retake the GRE. Students who want to feel prepared for every part of the GRE should sign up to study with a professional instructor at Veritas Prep. We offer valuable tips to students that they can utilize on every section of the test. Our instructors provide guided practice to students so they know how to approach each question on test day.

Researching College Admission Requirements

There is something else a student should do before registering to retake the GRE. They should check the specific admission requirements of the graduate schools they are interested in. In many instances, colleges and universities post the average GRE scores of their graduate students. Perhaps a student’s GRE scores on the first test are adequate for admission to the college they want to attend. If that’s the case, there is no valid reason to invest money and time into retaking the GRE.

How Often Can You Take the GRE?

Once a student decides to retake the test, they may wonder, how often can you take the GRE? Students are allowed to take the computer-based GRE one time every 21 days. Alternatively, if a student takes the paper-based GRE, they can take it whenever it is offered. Students who want to retake the GRE should allow themselves enough time to adequately prepare for the second go-round. This means addressing specific problems a student had the first time and taking steps to correct them.

How Many Times Can I Take the GRE?

Students interested in retaking this test may ask, “How many times can I take the GRE?” Students are able to take the GRE up to five times per year. This holds true even if a student decides to cancel their scores on a previous GRE. Of course, students should put forth their best performance the first time they take the test so they don’t have to go through the entire process again for the chance to earn better scores.

Can you retake the GRE with success? Yes.

Our team at Veritas Prep takes pride in providing students with a thorough program of GRE prep so they can perform at their best on the exam. Our instructors have experience with the test and can offer unique and practical advice to students. Those who want to know more about our program can find quick answers to common questions on our FAQ page. We are proud to use quality study resources to help students achieve their best scores on the GRE. Contact our staff today and get the advantage on the test with Veritas Prep!

We have an online GRE course starting in July! And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter.

GMAT or GRE: How Will MBA Admissions Officers View My GRE Score?

GRE vs. GMATOver the past five years or so, more business schools have been jumping on the GRE bandwagon by accepting either a GMAT or a GRE score. The percentage of candidates to top MBA programs who apply with only a GRE score is growing, but it’s still very small — less than 5% at most schools.

This leads many candidates to wonder how applying with a GRE score may be viewed by MBA admissions committees.

After speaking with dozens of admissions officers, I have a few insights that may be helpful:

  1. Feelings have changed over the past five years, so be careful that you don’t use outdated information. Countless blogs have been written over the years about whether to take the GRE. If they were not written in the past year, I would not put any stock in them. Attitudes have changed dramatically at many business schools over just the past year or two as they have greater experience in handling applicants with a GRE score in lieu of a GMAT score.
  1. Unless stated otherwise, almost all business schools genuinely do not have a preference between the GMAT and the GRE. While Veritas Prep believes that the GMAT exam offers a more accurate and nuanced assessment of the skills that business schools are looking for, according to feedback from admissions officers across the board and our independent analysis, the two exams are treated equally. Using data published by the business schools, trends clearly show that average GMAT scores and average GRE scores are nearly identical across the board. There is no inherent advantage or disadvantage to applying with a GRE score.
  1. Across the board, admissions officers use the official ETS score conversion tool to translate GRE scores into equivalent GMAT scores. Because so few candidates apply with a GRE score, the admissions committees don’t have a really strong grasp of the scoring scale. Every school we’ve spoken to uses ETS’ score conversion tool to convert GRE scores to GMAT scores so they may compare applicants fairly. You can use the same tool to see how your scores stack up.
  1. The GRE is not a differentiator. I get a lot of “traditional” MBA applicants with a management consulting or investment banking background who ask if they should take the GRE. They’re often nervous that their GMAT score won’t stack up against the stiff competition in their fields and hope that the GRE will differentiate them. Unfortunately, it doesn’t. If anything, admissions officers may wonder why they chose to take the GRE even though all factors in their career path point toward applying to MBA programs and not any other graduate programs. There’s no need to raise any questions in the mind of the admissions reader when the GMAT is a clear option.
  1. The GRE isn’t easier, but it’s different. I also see a lot of applicants who struggle with standardized tests who seek to “hide” behind a GRE score because they believe that it’s easier than the GMAT. Even if the content may seem more basic to you, what matters is how you stack up against the competition. Remember that every Masters in Engineering and Mathematics PhD candidate will be taking the GRE, focused solely on the Quant sections. They’re going to knock these sections out of the park without even breaking a sweat. On the other side, English Lit majors and other candidates for humanities-related degrees will be focused exclusively on the Verbal sections, and their grammar abilities are likely to be much better than yours. This means that getting a strong balanced score (which is what MBA admissions officers are looking for) becomes extremely difficult on the GRE. Even if the content feels easier to you, remember that the competition will tough. That said, if you’re struggling with the way the GMAT asks questions, you might find the GRE to be a more straightforward way of assessing your abilities. This can be an advantage to some applicants based on their unique thought process and learning style, but it shouldn’t be seen as a panacea for all test-takers.
  1. Some schools are GMAT-preferred. For example, Columbia Business School now accepts the GRE, but its website and admissions officers clearly state that they prefer the GMAT. If you’re applying to any business schools that fall into this category, we highly recommend that you take the GMAT unless there’s a very compelling argument for the GRE. One compelling argument might be that you have already scored well on the GRE to attend a master’s program directly out of undergrad and you would prefer not to take another standardized test to now get your MBA. Or perhaps you’re applying to a dual-degree program where the other program requires the GRE. Without a compelling reason otherwise, you should definitely plan to take the GMAT.

Bottom line: We recommend that the GMAT remain your default test if you’re planning to apply to exclusively to business schools. If you really struggle with the style of questions on the GMAT, you might want to explore the GRE as a backup option. In the end, you should simply take the test on which you can get the best score and not worry about trying to game the system.

If you have questions about whether the GMAT or the GRE would be a better option for your individual circumstances, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us at 1-800-925-7737 or submit your profile information on our website for a free admissions evaluation. And, as always, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

Travis Morgan is the Director of Admissions Consulting for Veritas Prep and earned his MBA with distinction from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. He served in the Kellogg Student Admissions Office, Alumni Admissions Organization and Diversity & Inclusion Council, among several other posts. Travis joined Veritas Prep as an admissions consultant and GMAT instructor, and he was named Worldwide Instructor of the Year in 2011. 

The GRE Scoring Range: Where Does Your Score Fall?

99Students who plan to apply to graduate school must take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). At Veritas Prep, one of the first things our students ask us about is the scoring process for the exam. They are curious about the GRE scoring range for each of the three sections. Interestingly, in August of 2011, the GRE revised its scoring scale to paint a clearer picture of a student’s performance.

Look at some facts about this exam that can help students to determine where their results fall on the GRE scoring scale.

Learning About the GRE Scoring Process
The GRE is divided into three parts; verbal reasoning, quantitative, and analytical writing. There is a range of possible scores for each section. For example, a student can score anywhere from 130 to 170 points on the verbal reasoning section of the exam. The GRE score range for the quantitative section also goes from 130 points up to 170. The verbal reasoning and quantitative sections are scored in one point increments. As for the analytical writing section, a student can earn a score ranging from 0 to 6 points. This section is scored in half point increments. There are some graduate schools that look at a composite score for the GRE, but many look at a student’s scores on the individual sections of the test.

Evaluating GRE Scores
As with other standardized tests, there are excellent, good, and average scores on the GRE. For instance, if a student’s verbal reasoning results fall into the GRE score range of 160 to 170 points, then he or she has achieved an excellent score on that section. A score of 155 points to 159 on the verbal reasoning section qualifies as a good score. On the quantitative section of the exam, a score of 163 points or more is excellent. A score in the mid-150s is a good score on this section. As for the analytical writing section, someone who scores a 6.0 would be in the 99th percentile. A score of around 5.0 is a good score for a student to earn for this section.

The Key to Achieving an Impressive Score on the GRE
In order to achieve the score they want, students must thoroughly prep for the GRE. One of the most effective ways to do this is to take practice exams. Taking a sample exam gives students the chance to learn about the format of the test as well as what types of questions they will encounter. Students who feel anxious about the GRE are likely to feel more at ease after getting a sneak preview of what they’ll see on test day. Plus, students can put the techniques and tips they learn at Veritas Prep into action as they work through sample questions. Students who walk into the test location feeling confident in their abilities are sure to achieve results that fall on the high end of the GRE scoring range.

Researching Test Score Requirements for Specific Schools
One thing students can do to get a better idea of what score to achieve on the GRE is to research the admission requirements of the graduate schools they are interested in. In many cases, colleges and universities post GRE scores and other statistics on their website to give visitors an idea of what they expect of their students. A college or university may even display a range of GRE scores that are acceptable on an admissions application. At Veritas Prep, our instructors are experts at conveying strategies and tips that are useful to students on any section of the exam. Students receive individualized attention, so they can get help with the skills that require improvement. We use proven study materials and resources that give students the tools they need to submit their best performance on this challenging test. Our students appreciate the opportunity to study for the GRE with professional instructors who are both supportive and encouraging.

Our team at Veritas Prep is proud to provide effective online classes that can help you to achieve your highest score on the GRE! Contact us at Veritas Prep to start studying today!

Want to jump-start your GRE preparation? Register to attend one of our upcoming free online GRE Strategy Sessions or check out our variety of GRE Course and Private Tutoring options. And as always, be sure to follow us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter!

6 Things You Need to Know About Taking the GRE

ChecklistStudents who are planning to apply to graduate school have a long list of things to do. One item on that list is to take the Graduate Record Examination, also known as the GRE. Many graduate schools require students to include these test results with their application. Look at some information on how to sign up for the GRE. Also, learn how our professional instructors at Veritas Prep help students prepare to excel on this critical exam.

1. Creating an Account

The first stop for a student who wants to sign up for this exam is the website of the Educational Testing Service or the ETS. A student must create an account on this site in order to sign up for the GRE. Also, students are able to look at their test scores via this account. It’s important that a student uses his or her full name when creating an account. This same name should be used when a student signs up for the test. Any discrepancy such as the use of an abbreviated name may cause a delay in the registration process. Also, if the name on a student’s registration form is different than the one on his or her identification, the student may not be allowed to take the GRE on test day.

2. Choose a Testing Location and a Test Date

Once a student creates an account on the ETS website, it’s a wise idea to check the various deadlines for test registration. A student must register by the deadline in order to avoid paying a fee. After noting the test deadlines, it’s time to find a testing location. A student should begin the search by clicking on his or her country, state and city. After entering the appropriate information, there may be several test locations to choose from. After clicking on a nearby testing location, a student is able to choose a test date and see if there are any seats available at that location. The GRE sign-up process is simple if students follow all of the steps involved in choosing a date and location.

3. Paying the Test Fee

The fee to take the GRE is $195.00. This fee is paid during the GRE sign-up process. Students should keep in mind that there are additional fees for services such as changing to another test center or another test day. There is the option of getting a fee reduction certificate if a student meets all of the eligibility requirements. Our experienced team at Veritas Prep understands the financial investment that a student makes in the GRE. That’s why we offer online GRE prep courses that give students the tools they need to master this exam. Students learn simple test-taking strategies and put them into practice under the guidance of an instructor. We instill our students with the confidence they need to achieve their best scores on the GRE.

4. Learn What to Bring and What Not to Bring on Test Day

Students should bring valid identification on test day. The name on the ID should match the name the student used to register for the test. Also, students should have their test admission ticket. The admission ticket bears the testing location, the test date, and the colleges that will receive test results. There are no electronic devices or phones allowed in the testing area.

5. Dressing for the Test

Students taking the GRE will be at the testing location for a little over three hours. The total testing time may be longer if students are allowed to take breaks that last more than a few minutes. One valuable tip is to wear loose fitting, comfortable clothing to the testing location. Students may want to bring a sweater in case the room is cold. Not surprisingly, a student’s level of comfort during the test does have an effect on their performance.

6. Sending Test Results to Colleges

The test fee includes the option of sending GRE score results to up to four colleges. Those who want to arrange to send additional score reports to other colleges must pay a fee. Students can also look at their test scores via their account on the ETS website. A student’s scores on the GRE are valid for five years.

Our expert instructors use effective resources to help you ace the GRE! Contact our staff at Veritas Prep and start prepping for the GRE today.

We have an online GRE course starting in July! And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

The Perfect GRE Score

GMATMost students who sign up with Veritas Prep to study for the Graduate Record Examination, or the GRE, have a lot of questions. One typical question is, “What is the highest score on the GRE?” Many students want to know the top GRE score so they can set their own personal goals for this exam. Students are also curious about the individual sections on the test and the type of material they will encounter.

Check out some facts about the subject matter on the GRE and take a look at the highest GRE score a student can earn.

The Three Sections of the GRE

Before thinking about scores, a student should learn about the various sections of the GRE. There are three sections that test a student’s verbal reasoning, quantitative, and analytical writing skills. The verbal reasoning section contains questions that measure a student’s reading comprehension abilities. For the text completion questions, a student must choose the most suitable word based on the context of a passage. Students must have an expansive vocabulary in order to choose the appropriate word for both the text completion and sentence equivalence portions of the verbal reasoning section.

The quantitative or math section of the GRE gauges a student’s abilities in the areas of arithmetic, basic algebra, basic geometry, and data interpretation. The questions in both the verbal reasoning and quantitative sections are in multiple-choice form. The analytical writing section of the GRE asks students to write two essays. One is an issue essay, and the other is an argument essay. These essays reveal how well a student can express, defend, and organize their ideas.

What Is the Highest Score on the GRE?

The highest GRE score a student can earn on the verbal reasoning section is 170 points. A perfect GRE score on the quantitative section is 170 points as well. The scoring scale for the verbal reasoning and quantitative sections ranges from 130 to 170 possible points. These two sections are scored in one-point increments. The highest GRE score possible on the analytical writing section is six points. The scoring scale for this section ranges from one to six points and is scored in half-point increments.

Some students add their verbal reasoning and quantitative scores together to get a single total. However, most graduate school admissions officials look at each of the scores separately. This gives them a clearer picture of a student’s specific abilities. At Veritas Prep, our talented instructors help students to achieve their best on the GRE. We offer online GRE prep classes that are convenient for busy students who want to learn the practical strategies they need to earn a GRE top score.

Earning a Good Score on the GRE

A student doesn’t have to achieve a perfect GRE score to gain admission into a prominent graduate program. Not surprisingly, GRE score requirements vary from school to school. Speaking generally, a score of 163 to 167 is considered a good total on the verbal reasoning section of the test. Furthermore, 164 to 168 points is a good score for the quantitative section. As for the analytical writing section, a score of 5.0 is a good total. One of the most useful things students can do before taking the GRE is to visit the websites of colleges they are interested in. In most cases, a college or university’s website will post statistics in the admission section that include the average GRE scores of its students. This can give a potential applicant an idea of what they need to score on the GRE to impress the admissions committee.

Veritas Prep’s professional instructors take pride in helping students to perform at their best on the GRE. We use study resources that give students the tools they need to tackle any question on the GRE. Our tutors provide individualized instruction and practical tips to students so they can strengthen the skills they need to improve in preparation for the test.

Students who work with Veritas Prep enjoy an advantage over their peers on test day. Our knowledgeable team gives students first-rate instruction and practice that instills them with confidence in their test-taking abilities. Call or email us today to start prepping for the GRE.

We have an online GRE course starting in July! And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!

The Differences Between the GMAT and the GRE

GMAT vs. GREA student’s application to graduate school contains a lot of information about the individual, their grades, and their test scores. Most students who plan to pursue a graduate degree know about the Graduate Record Examination or the GRE. Students who want to pursue a master’s degree in business administration (MBA) are likely to know about the Graduate Management Admission Test, or the GMAT. Is it necessary for a student to take both tests? If not, should a student take the GMAT or GRE? Consider some information about both tests that can help students to make a decision regarding which one to take.

The Choice Between the GRE or GMAT for MBA Degree Programs

One important decision for students who want to apply to business school is whether to take the GRE or GMAT. For MBA candidates, it used to be a requirement to take the GMAT. Today, an increasing number of business schools accept GRE results from applicants. The best course of action for students interested in earning an MBA is to look at the specific requirements of the schools they are interested in attending. This is a simple way for students to decide whether to take the GMAT or GRE before applying to a business school. At Veritas Prep, we offer courses that help students study for the GMAT and the GRE. Students can benefit from working with skillful instructors who have experience with these tests. We offer both online and in-person classes that make preparing for the GMAT or GRE convenient for busy individuals.

The Content of the GMAT and the GRE

Learning about the content of each test can help students to achieve their highest possible scores. Both of these tests share similar content. For instance, both contain reading comprehension questions in the verbal section. Also, there is a quantitative section on the GMAT as well as on the GRE. The main difference between these two tests is that the GMAT has a section on integrated reasoning while the GRE does not. In addition, students taking the GMAT are required to write just one argument essay for the analytic writing section. The GRE requires students to write both an argument essay and an issue essay for the analytical writing section. Our Veritas Prep instructors are experts at providing students with practical strategies they can use to answer even the most challenging questions on these tests. We specialize in giving students tips that simplify test questions to make them more manageable for students.

The Duration and Cost of Both Tests

It takes a little over three hours to complete the GRE, whereas it takes about three and a half hours to complete the GMAT. The GMAT lasts a little bit longer due to its integrated reasoning section. Of course, the total amount of time a student spends at a test location also depends on the number of breaks students are given between sections. When it comes to the fee a student pays to take the test, there is a big difference between the GRE and the GMAT. Students pay $195.00 to take the GRE and they pay $250.00 to take the GMAT. The results of the GRE and the GMAT are valid for five years.

The Benefits of Studying with Veritas Prep

Along with being taught by the professional instructors at Veritas Prep, students also prepare for the GRE or the GMAT using quality study resources and materials. We provide students with individualized attention so they have their specific needs addressed. We help our students to pinpoint and strengthen their weaker skills so they can study with time-saving efficiency. Our students appreciate the encouragement and support they receive as they progress through our GRE and GMAT prep courses. We know that it can be a stressful time for students as they try to figure out which graduate schools to apply to. So, we work to instill our students with a sense of confidence about their performance on test day. Experienced instructors partner with students as they practice for these critical exams.

Whether you decide to take the GRE or the GMAT we can help you prepare to put forth your best performance on test day. Call or email us today and let our team of talented instructors guide you to success on the test!

We have an online GRE course starting in July! And, be sure to find us on Facebook and Google+, and follow us on Twitter!