SAT Prep - Algebra Resources Galore!

High school students spend four years of their teenage lives racking their brains about standardized tests, especially the PSAT, SAT, and ACT. Decades ago, students took the SAT without taking an SAT prep course. But today’s high school students have to contend with stiffer competition with hopes of entering a prestigious university based on their test-taking performance. As a result, the stakes are higher, which requires students to prepare for standardized tests well before test day.

Many students spend countless hours and immeasurable effort in an attempt to achieve their highest possible score. But it’s worth it. Students who wisely invest their time in preparing for standardized tests also often earn a higher high school grade point average (GPA). In addition, academically prepared students excel on their college exams, coursework, and ultimately in their professions if they maintain the rigorous study habits it took to obtain a high score on the SAT.

Students who wish to achieve high scores on standardized tests must remain committed to hard work, usually involving learning test strategies, doing practice tests, and learning vocabulary. Students may benefit from hiring an SAT tutor to fully understand elusive subjects. A motivated student can study for the mathematical portion of the SAT with minimal hassle; however, studies have shown that the majority of students retain their knowledge with a professional who can direct them in understanding the material.

SAT Math consists of three sections. Most of the questions are multiple-choice, but a minority are free-response, which require the student to fill in his/her own answer. Although these questions are slightly more difficult for students, the SAT does not penalize students for incorrect answers (like it does for multiple-choice questions). So even if you have no idea how to solve a free-response SAT Math question, you should still make an educated guess because there’s no penalty for guessing incorrectly.

Each of the SAT Math sections is organized by order of difficulty: relatively easy questions to begin a section followed by progressively harder questions as you get further along in a section. But all of the SAT Math questions are worth the same amount of points. Therefore, it’s better to answer 2 easy SAT Math questions correctly than just 1 hard SAT Math question.

When you practice for the SAT, make sure you try to mimic real-life test conditions as much as possible. Take a timed practice test with just a test booklet, pencil, water, no internet/cell phone, etc. Simulating test day conditions will help you get ready for your big exam day. Begin your preparation for the SAT Math section with the resources below.

Tools for Students Lesson Plans Worksheets/Homework Helpers Games Practice Tests
By Scott Shrum