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Client: Our newest line of mini-computer, the JS-780, is not gaining traction with our customers. Although it is a better product than our main competitor's SS-600 and has a faster processor, and a more sophisticated graphics card, the product has not sold as many units as the SS-600. Our JS-780 is priced higher than the SS-600. We would like to figure out how to convince potential customers to pay more for our product as opposed to purchasing our competitor's product.

Marketing Consultant: Our research shows that many people do not understand the benefits of having a mini-computer with a faster processor and more sophisticated graphic card. I recommend that you run a television commercial featuring a well-known celebrity who will educate the public about the benefits of having such features in a mini-computer. People are generally trusting of well-known celebrities and find commercials featuring those celebrities persuasive. Therefore I recommend that you undertake such a television commercials.

In for the Marketing Consultant's suggestion to have the client's desired effect, it depends upon a cause and effect relationship. Choose the cause and subsequent effect in the columns below upon which the Marketing Consultant's suggestion depends. Choose only one for each column.
CauseEffectStatements
The public will become more trusting of well-known celebrities.
The public will find the commercial campaign to be persuasive.
The JS-780 will be featured in the commercial.
The public will place a greater value on a mini-computer with a faster processor and more sophisticated graphics card.
The makers of the SS-600 will respond with their own commercial featuring a well-known celebrity.
The public will purchase mini-computers in greater quantities than they have in the past.



CauseEffectStatements
  The public will become more trusting of well-known celebrities.
 The public will find the commercial campaign to be persuasive.
  The JS-780 will be featured in the commercial.
 The public will place a greater value on a mini-computer with a faster processor and more sophisticated graphics card.
  The makers of the SS-600 will respond with their own commercial featuring a well-known celebrity.
  The public will purchase mini-computers in greater quantities than they have in the past.


Note here that the goal of the marketing consultant is to find a way to convince customers to spend more money on a faster processor and more sophisticated graphics card -- or, put another way, to ascribe more value to these features. Accordingly, the campaign needs to persuade people that these features have increased value. Therefore, the cause-effect relationship should start with a convincing, compelling campaign, and the effect should be that people do, in fact, see that value as a result. That makes the cause the second item ("the public will find the commercial campaign to be persuasive") and the effect the fourth ("the public will place a greater value on..." these features).

The first choice is out of scope, as the factual, given information already states that the public finds these celebrities trustworthy, so no increase there is necessary. The third choice is also unnecessary -- the commercials' goal is to ascribe value to the features, and not necessarily that particular machine. The fifth choice is far out of scope (nowhere in the goals would there be any desire for the competition to perform their own commercials). And the sixth, while tempting, is also out of scope. The sixth choice pertains to all mini-computers, and this campaign is specific to the properties of the JS-780. Selling more JS-780s is the ultimate goal, but the particular steps involve marketing the particular attributes, not growing the entire market segment.