3 Crucial Lessons for Women in Business

Women MBAAt a recent women’s leadership conference at Ross, dozens of women spoke about their experiences in business, the influential advice they have received, and the lessons they have learned over the years. Most of this advice is universal, but some is specific to women, as we often tend to face different challenges in the business world. Here are three important lessons I learned from this conference:

1. You have to let your manager know when you want to get promoted.
Of course, this will depend slightly on the company and its structure, but if your supervisor doesn’t know that you have the desire to move up in your company, someone else could get promoted ahead of you. Show interest in growing with the company by taking on more projects and vocalizing that you are eventually interested in moving up to Director, Partner, etc. If you have a good relationship with your supervisor, talk about the steps you should take early in your career to get closer to those positions when the time comes.

2. There’s no certainty about the future, so take what’s in front of you right now.
If you think you might want to start a family in the next year, don’t stop yourself from applying for a new position because you might have to go on leave after a few months. Take advantage of the opportunities you have because you never know what the future has in store. Perhaps your planned move to a different city doesn’t happen, or you and your partner decide you want to wait another few years before having a child. If you don’t take advantage of what comes your way, you might not have another opportunity for a while.

3. If everyone at work likes you, you’re not doing something right.
You need to approach your work with a business mindset and make the best decisions for the company. Sometimes those decisions won’t please everyone, and that is okay because you know that you are doing the best job you can to help your organization succeed. If everyone at work likes you, it probably means you aren’t pushing thought boundaries the way you should, so try walking the fine line of being friendly and tough as a woman in the workplace.

Sometimes it can be difficult to be a well-respected woman in business, and while this mindset may be changing, it isn’t changing as quickly as some of us would like it to. With this in mind, take charge of your professional life – let your boss know that you’re here for the long run and that you want to work your way up the ladder. Take advantage of the opportunities that you have, and stand by your decisions, even if they don’t please everyone in the office.

First though, you need to get into the business world, and what better way to do that than talk to a Veritas Prep admissions consultant? We can help you decide which MBA program is the best fit for you!

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on Facebook, YouTube, Google+ and Twitter.

Colleen Hill is a Veritas Prep consultant for the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. You can read more articles by her here

New Considerations When Applying to Kellogg

Kellogg MBA Admissions GuideThe Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University has recently released its “Facts and Figures” statistics for the new Class of 2018, and boy is it impressive! With record numbers across the board, it is important for prospective MBA candidates to understand what some of these key facts and figures are, as well as what strategic insights about the school can be uncovered from the new numbers.

Record GMAT Score
The first and most prominent metric that jumps out in Kellogg’s “Facts and Figures” is the school’s impressive GMAT average, which has climbed to 728! To put this in context, Kellogg’s 2012 “Facts and Figures” listed their average GMAT score as 708 – 20 points lower than it is today, less than five years later.

Kellogg’s average GMAT score has been rapidly rising every year. In fact, its current number is 2 points higher than Harvard’s last reported average GMAT score, representing a significant change in the school’s approach to admissions as more “numbers driven”. Historically, Kellogg has used a much more holistic approach to admissions, often admitting candidates who may have been “soft” in their GPA or GMAT numbers. While Kellogg remains holistic, it is clear that key quantitative data points, like GMAT scores, have increased in importance.

Record Gender Diversity
Kellogg has always placed an emphasis on gender diversity, both in admissions and within the student community, consistently boasting one of the most active Women’s Business Association and strongest female alumni networks. So Kellogg’s record percentage of women in their program represents a strong actualization of the school’s mission. I suspect Kellogg will continue to take a leadership role in this category and aim to grow their 43% women closer to a 50/50 ratio.

Shrinking the Two-Year Class
Since taking over the helm at Kellogg, Dean Sally Blount has sought to re-balance the school’s two-year and one-year programs – the goal with this approach is to shrink the two-year class and increase the one-year class. This plan is not only a strategic one to attract specific audiences (those for whom the two-year program may not be the best fit) but also, potentially, a functional one that will allow the school to improve the statistics of its two-year program, which is reflected most notably in the advertised class profile.

Interested candidates should use these trends to identify the best program type for their unique profile. Candidates with “softer” data points and a strong business background may want to consider the one-year program as a potential option, given the increasing competitiveness of Kellogg’s two-year program.

Kellogg’s “Facts and Figures” are always a great representation of trends at the school. Use the factors above to develop the optimal strategy for your own application to Kellogg. And for more information on Kellogg, check out Veritas Prep’s Essential Guide to Top Business Schools.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter.

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants. You can read more articles by him here.

How Does Diversity Play Into MBA Admissions?

AdmissionDiversity has become a buzzword throughout the business world, however one place where its potential has not been fully realized is in the classrooms of some of the top MBA programs in the world. In this way, many business schools struggle to emulate the markets to which they send graduates to.

We can all agree diversity in the workplace and in the classroom make for a more rewarding experience for all. Let’s discuss how diversity can manifest itself during the MBA application process:

Ethnic Diversity:
In the United States, this is one of the most important and severely-lacking forms of diversity in top MBA programs. Underrepresented minorities – such as African-Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanic Americans – in the U.S. still represent tiny portions of most schools’ incoming classes.

Many blue chip companies rely on MBA programs to serve as feeders for their talent, and if MBA programs remain barren of diverse candidates, then top companies will also struggle in this department. Given this need, qualified, underrepresented minorities really can stand out in the application process if they package together the “right” application.

Gender Diversity:
Business schools have made remarkable strides when it comes to gender diversity. MBA programs have historically been a “boys club,” but most programs have narrowed the gap here and come closer to the desired 50/50 gender ratio. This year, Northwestern’s Kellogg School even reported a record 43% of female MBA students in their Class of 2018. Even with these improvements, women still remain a minority of sorts, which can prove advantageous in the application process.

International Diversity:
The business world has become truly global – a shift that most programs have tried to mirror. The business school campus of today can take on the look of the United Nations, itself. The array of experience and thought this diversity brings to the classroom can help shape a class set out to become the global leaders of tomorrow. Remember, there are certain regions of the world that are underrepresented and others that are over-represented, so international diversity can go both ways when it comes to admissions.

With the holistic nature of the MBA admissions process, diversity can play a huge role in shaping the student community for the incoming class. This diversity of thought, perspective, and experience is certainly a hallmark of the MBA experience.

Applying to business school? Call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today, or take our free MBA Admissions Profile Evaluation for personalized advice for your unique application situation! As always, be sure to find us on FacebookYouTubeGoogle+ and Twitter.

Dozie A. is a Veritas Prep Head Consultant for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. His specialties include consulting, marketing, and low GPA/GMAT applicants. You can read more articles by him here.

More Women Than Ever Are Going to Business School

MBA Admissions
According to a new article by Rebecca Knight in the Financial Times (free registration required), the typical MBA classroom now has more women in it than ever before. The article cites a study by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, which shows that women now make up about 37% of the student body at traditional full-time business schools in the U.S., up from 33% just five years ago (and up from 30% ten years ago).

This steady progress in closing the gender gap is the result of constant effort on the part of top business schools. In the last decade, schools have started to aggressively recruit students before they even graduate college, host more women-oriented events on campus to help prospective applicants get a taste of life at business school, and partner with organizations like the Forte Foundation (a Veritas Prep partner) to meet more female applicants in their hometowns.


Even better news is that this is not a uniquely American phenomenon — most top business schools in Europe also have attracted more women. INSEAD’s most recent graduating class, for example, was 34% women, up from 23% in 2000.

Admissions officers interviewed by the Financial Times all pointed to one significant disadvantage that MBA programs have in attracting women, compared to other professional graduate programs: Most schools expect applicant to have at least several years of full-time work experience before applying. For some young women thinking of starting a family soon, the idea of needing to build up a few years of professional momentum before even applying to school means that they may have to wait longer than they would like before having children.

This partly explains top business schools’ push to attract younger applicants (such as Harvard Business School’s HBS 2+2 Program). Early results seem to suggest that these programs are in fact attracting more women: About half of the 116 students in the program’s first year are women, compared to the full-time MBA program’s Class of 2010, which is 38% women. (And we’re proud to say that we helped a few of those women get accepted to the program!)

For more advice on getting into the world’s top business schools, be sure to subscribe to this blog and to follow us on Twitter. If you want to get your candidacy started immediately, call us at (800) 925-7737 and speak with a Veritas Prep admissions expert today!