Another Good Reason to Apply to the HBS 2+2 Program: Flexibility

An article that appeared in yesterday’s edition of The Harvard Crimson described an interesting phenomenon that is happening in the first cohort of students who were admitted to the HBS 2+2 Program back in 2008. Rather than entering Harvard Business School as first-year students last fall, a surprising number decided to keep working and delay their matriculation for another year.

According to the article (which mentions some former Veritas Prep students!), of the 106 students who were accepted in the HBS 2+2 Program’s first year, 65 entered HBS this past fall, 40 postponed matriculation, and one dropped out. And the trend is growing: For the group that is supposed to start at HBS this coming fall, more than half have decided to postpone matriculation.
Continue reading “Another Good Reason to Apply to the HBS 2+2 Program: Flexibility”

HBS 2+2 Program Admissions Essays and Deadlines for 2011-2012

HBS 2+2 ProgramThe Harvard Business School admissions committee has just released its admissions essays for the HBS 2+2 Program for the coming year. Today we’ll dig into the program’s application deadlines and those essays.

Regarding deadlines, note that the big change since last year is that there are now four deadlines, vs. one single summer deadline for the program. Even though the window in which you can apply is now more wide open, note that the program is still designed with current college juniors in mind. (HBS phrases it as anyone who will “be graduating from your college or university between October 1, 2011 and September 30, 2012,” which mostly applies to those who are just wrapping up their junior year in college.)
Continue reading “HBS 2+2 Program Admissions Essays and Deadlines for 2011-2012”

Admissions 101: You Don’t Go Into the Interview with a Blank Slate

Today we introduce a new series on the Veritas Prep Blog: Admissions 101. From time to time we’ll dig into various basis strategies for getting into the world’s top graduate schools, blowing up some dangerous myths along the way.

Today’s piece was inspired by the wave of HBS 2+2 Program interview invitations that were sent out yesterday. (Congrats to all of our clients who were invited! There are only about 200 of you!) Soon after learning he had been invited, one of our clients said, “I’m halfway through the door. As long as I don’t screw up the interview, I should be in.”

Well, that’s not exactly how it works.


It’s easy for an applicant to look at last year’s HBS 2+2 Program admissions statistics and think, “Wow, if they invited around 200 people and last year they admitted more than 100, all I have to do is be in the top half of interviewees and I’m in!” That line of thinking assumes that the admissions process is a perfectly linear one in which the committee cuts down the applicant pool and then starts fresh with the remaining applicants, forgetting everything they already know about them as they go into the interview. This sort of “admissions amnesia” just doesn’t happen.

In reality, the admissions office right away knows that it won’t admit a large number of applicants (for whatever reason: lack of fit with the program, underwhelming grades, no evidence of leadership potential, etc.), so it makes sense for them to just cut those applicants out of the process right away, since interviewing everyone just isn’t practical. (When you go on a first date with someone and just know right off the bat that it won’t work out, you don’t keep seeing them for a while.) So, they cut down the pool to a more manageable number before sending out invites.

But, as interview invites go out, they already have well-formed opinions about the remaining applicants: “John has terrific leadership experience but we wonder about his quant skills… Mary has very interesting career goals but we’re just not sure if an MBA is right for her… Tony brings it all to the table and looks like a very promising candidate.” They go into the interview with these opinions and questions, and in large part the purpose of the interview is to help them confirm what they know and find out what they don’t know.

(We should note here that HBS is somewhat unique in this regard. Many top schools conduct interviews blind, meaning that the interviewer hasn’t extensively reviewed you application. And other schools allow everyone to interview, rather than conducting them by invite only. However, this “the process isn’t perfectly linear” point still applies. It all gets fed into the final decision.)

Then — and here’s the important thing to remember — they then feed that information back into your entire candidacy, and they then decide on what to do with you. You could walk into the interview with them already loving you, and do just okay in the interview, and still get in. You could go into the interview with the admissions committee having lots of questions about your fit with the school, and you could earn rave reviews from your interviewer, but ultimately be rejected because of those questions that were raised before you ever walked in the door.

Both types of examples are very common among applicants. Every year we hear from applicants who say, “I thought I bombed the interview, but I still got in!” and “I was AMAZING in the interview, and my interviewer even said so. So why did I get dinged?” It’s because the interview is just one part of the process, and it’s compared against everything else in your application before a decision is made. Every part of your application matters right up until the moment when a decision is rendered.

What does this mean for you? For those HBS 2+2 Program applicants, it means that some are already well on their way to being admitted, although they don’t know it yet. For others, it means that their odds aren’t great, but at least HBS saw enough in them to give them an interview, so they’re still very much in the game. For that latter group, the interview will obviously matter more. Since you don’t know which camp you’re in, you need to prepare for the interview like it matters a ton. But know that everything in your application — your GMAT score, your essays, your letters of recommendation, your undergraduate work, and your work history — will still matter a lot.

To learn more about the HBS 2+2 Program and what they look for in college undergrads, call us at 800-925-7737. And, as always, be sure to subscribe to this blog and follow us on Twitter!

Three Things to Remember as You Finish Your HBS 2+2 Program Application

HBS 2+2 ProgramIf you’re a rising college senior who hopes to get into Harvard Business School’s HBS 2+2 Program, you’re probably already knee-deep in writing and editing your admissions essays. (The deadline is just two weeks from today! Before you know it your summer will be over!) While most of your candidacy is set in stone at this point — your GPA, the work experience you’ve accumulated to date, and probably your GMAT score — there’s still plenty of time to improve your chances with terrific essays and meaningful letters of recommendation.

So what can you do or say at this stage that will make a difference? A lot, really. While the applicant pool is very competitive — and will likely be significantly larger than last year’s — the good news is that you’re going up against a lot of other young, inexperienced (albeit bright and accomplished) applicants. They may be talented, but many of them probably don’t know how to approach the admissions process strategically. That’s where you can gain an advantage.


Here are three things you should keep in mind as you put the finishing touches on your HBS 2+2 Program application:
  1. Sure you’re smart. But you need to bring more to the table. This might very well be the first time in your life when you’re judged on much more than just your grades and standardized test scores. If you’ve done well in school and have a GMAT score that puts you in contention for the HBS 2+2 Program, then you’re probably pretty bright. But Harvard (and all top business schools, for that matter) really wants to find young professionals who make a positive impact on the community around them, no matter where they come from. So, while having a 4.0 in biomedical engineering may get you into most top graduate schools, it won’t be enough to get you into the HBS 2+2 Program unless you also can show a track record of getting involved in your community (and we use the term “community” pretty broadly here, including your college, a company where you worked, or the actual neighborhood in which you live). That’s what will separate the merely “smart” applicants from the truly impressive ones.
  2. You’re young. Don’t try to hide that fact. While the HBS admissions office seeks candidates with impressive experiences and strong potential, they also realize that you’re 20-21 years old. HBS built programs such as this one to help the school find high-potential young professionals such as yourself, before you fall into the arms of another top business school or other graduate program. They know you haven’t done and see everything yet, so don’t pretend to be someone you’re not. They DO want to see that you are bright, are curious about the world, and you’re the type to get involved and make things happen. But they realize that many of your stories may see a little silly or trivial compared to those of a 26-year-old professional. That’s okay. As long as you project maturity, your actual age doesn’t matter.
  3. If you don’t get in, that doesn’t mean HBS hates you forever. The acceptance rate for last year’s HBS 2+2 applicant pool was 14% and may even go lower this year), so no more than one in seven applicants will get in. For many, many of those applicants, Harvard Business School will like what they see, but simply won’t be able to admit them over even better qualified applicants. So, if you’re admitted and HBS tells you “Try again in a few years,” the admissions office really means that. And devote those years to demonstrating the leadership, initiative, and maturity that Harvard wants to see. Do that, and you will be in a good position to apply again after a couple of years of full-time work experience under your belt. You will have NO negative baggage associated with your candidacy if you apply to the traditional MBA program a few years from now.

Right now we’re assisting many applicants as they put the finishing touches on their HBS 2+2 Program applications. For more advice on getting into Harvard Business School, download our HBS Annual Report, one of 15 completely free guides to the world’s top business schools. If you still could use some help pulling it all together (and there is definitely still time for you to make a difference!), call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today!

HBS 2+2 Program Application Essays for 2010

HBS 2+2 ProgramRecently Harvard Business School announced the 2010 deadline for its HBS 2+2 Program. While the deadline has changed quite a bit since last year (it’s several weeks earlier than before), but the program’s admissions essays actually remain the same.

So, our comments and advice mostly remain the same, but it’s still worth sharing them again. Note that there are a few subtle nuances in our advice that are new this year, based on feedback we’ve heard directly from successful HBS 2+2 Program applicants this past year:


HBS 2+2 Program Application Essays
  1. What are your three most substantial accomplishments and why do you view them as such? (600 words)

    This is exactly the same question on the traditional HBS application. While you are obviously younger than the typical HBS applicant, the school still expects to see several separate, concrete examples of how you made a positive impact on the organization, community, or people around you. Having a hard time coming up with many? That may be the first sign that you’re not yet ready to apply to HBS (or to any top MBA program). If that’s the case, don’t despair… You just may want to consider the more traditional route of working for several years before applying to business school.

  2. What would you like us to know about your undergraduate academic experience? (400 words)

    Being that you probably don’t yet have any full-time work experience, the admissions office needs to dig a little deeper into your undergraduate experience to learn more about you. Don’t simply recount your transcript here. Why did you choose your major in college? What motivated you to choose certain course? Were there any instances when you really pushed yourself out of your comfort zone? Focus on just one or two themes here, ideally showing how you have grown academically over the past three years. Harvard loves the idea of being able to transform you from young raw ingredients into a polished, finished product. Showing glimpses of such a transformation in the first three years of college can help the HBS admissions office picture you thriving at HBS.

  3. What have you learned from a mistake? (400 words)

    This is also taken directly from the standard HBS application. Just like with all mistake essays, you want to show introspection (What did you learn?) and a motivation for self-improvement (How did you use what you learned to better yourself and avoid that mistake again?). While you won’t have the same experiences as a twenty-five-year-old applicant to draw upon here, look for experiences in all aspects of your life where you learned a valuable lesson. There’s a good chance that your richest story will come from outside of your academics.

  4. Optional Essays (choose one)

    – Discuss how you have engaged with a community or organization. (400 words)

    – What area of the world are you most curious about and why? (400 words)

    – What is your career vision and why is this choice meaningful to you? (400 words)

    All three of these are also taken from the standard HBS application. We always recommend that applicants err on the side of discussing themselves, the decisions they’ve made, and the impact they’ve made on those around them — not on a person or an idea that they hold dear. The former is really the only way the admissions office will get to you YOU, and without knowing you, how can Harvard admit you?

    These specific examples of your initiative and leadership are extremely valuable, especially if you are relatively inexperienced. This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t answer one of the other questions, but be careful to avoid discussing big-picture generalities that don’t let the admissions committee get to know the real you.

Every year we work with many applicants to the HBS 2+2 Program, and many of them get in! For more advice on getting into Harvard Business School, download our HBS Annual Report, one of 15 completely free guides to the world’s top business schools. If you’re ready to start building your own HBS 2+2 Program candidacy, call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today!

One More Reason to Apply to HBS While You Are Young

MBA Admissions
If you’ve been reading our blog for a while, you no doubt have picked up on the fact that Harvard Business School has been the most vocal among top business schools about trying to attract younger applicants. By “younger” we mean that, while the mean number of years of work experience for students entering top business schools is still around 5 (note that’s the number of years of full-time work experience at matriculation, not when they submit their applications), Harvard has made a point of encouraging applicants to apply with fewer than three years of experience. In fact, nearly half of the Class of 2011‘s 937 students has no more than three years of full-time work experience.

As if being an “old” applicant (i.e., someone with 5+ years of work experience) doesn’t seem tough enough these days, now comes word that HBS is encouraging college seniors to apply in Round 3. As Dee Leopold wrote on the HBS Admissions Blog the other day:


If you are a college senior who wants to go to HBS – but not right away – then applying in Round 3 could be a smart choice.

Why?

  1. The positive outcome is going to be “deferred admission” — a guaranteed spot in the class of 2014 with the stipulation that you work for two years before matriculation.
  2. No target or cap on the number of deferred admit spots we will offer. Last year 43 college seniors were offered deferred admission.
  3. No downside: If you aren’t admitted, apply again in a couple of years — lots of denied college seniors are successful in the future.
  4. The application fee is only $100.
  5. GMAT/GRE scores are good for 5 years – why not take the test in college while you are still in test-taking mode?


Applying to HBS or any other top MBA program in Round 3 can be daunting enough on its own, but this doesn’t help. However, this is great news if you’re a college senior who missed the boat on the HBS 2+2 Program before your senior year.

Overall, if you’re an older applicant, stop reading this post (lest you just make yourself more stressed). If you’re a college senior or a fresh-out-of-college applicant, however, this is one more reason to think about applying to Harvard Business School sooner rather than later, provided that you’re truly ready. This means that you have a competitive GMAT score, already have an idea of who can write great letters of recommendation for you, and have some good experiences to draw upon to demonstrate your leadership abilities and your maturity. If you already have these things (or have an idea of how you can get them within the next year), Harvard’s signal is clear: They would rather that you apply now, rather than a few years from now.

For more advice on getting into Harvard Business School, download the free HBS Annual Report, one of 15 completely free guides to the world’s top business schools, available on our site. If you’re ready to start building your own candidacy, call us at 1-800-925-7737 and speak with an MBA admissions expert today!

HBS 2+2 Application Deadline Announced for 2010

HBS 2+2 ProgramHarvard Business School has just announced this year’s application deadline for the HBS 2+2 Program: June 15, 2010. Note that this is a couple of week’s earlier than last year’s deadline.

Harvard launched the HBS 2+2 Program to encourage high achieving undergraduate students who are not on a “business track,” to pursue careers in business. The program targets students focused on non-business concentrations such as engineering, liberal arts, science etc. Accordingly, they’re looking for students coming from those majors, rather than from undergraduate business programs. (If you’re in college now and fall into the latter camp, have no fear! That’s what the traditional HBS two-year MBA program is for.)


If you’re current a college junior, this deadline announcement is most relevant to you, since you will apply right after your junior year ends. To get a feel for what to expect in the coming months, take a look at the HBS 2+2 Program Timeline on Harvard’s web site. You’ll notice that the timeline suggests taking the GMAT or GRE this spring. If you haven’t yet gotten ready for the test, take a look at Veritas Prep’s GMAT prep options.

After getting the GMAT or GRE score that you want, then you’ll need to focus on writing a terrific application. Fortunately, we’ve been helping applicants do that for years, and we have helped many HBS 2+2 Program applicants since the program’s inception in 2008. To get an early read on your own admissions chances, give us a call at 800-925-7737 and speak with a Veritas Prep MBA admissions expert today!

More Women Than Ever Are Going to Business School

MBA Admissions
According to a new article by Rebecca Knight in the Financial Times (free registration required), the typical MBA classroom now has more women in it than ever before. The article cites a study by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, which shows that women now make up about 37% of the student body at traditional full-time business schools in the U.S., up from 33% just five years ago (and up from 30% ten years ago).

This steady progress in closing the gender gap is the result of constant effort on the part of top business schools. In the last decade, schools have started to aggressively recruit students before they even graduate college, host more women-oriented events on campus to help prospective applicants get a taste of life at business school, and partner with organizations like the Forte Foundation (a Veritas Prep partner) to meet more female applicants in their hometowns.


Even better news is that this is not a uniquely American phenomenon — most top business schools in Europe also have attracted more women. INSEAD’s most recent graduating class, for example, was 34% women, up from 23% in 2000.

Admissions officers interviewed by the Financial Times all pointed to one significant disadvantage that MBA programs have in attracting women, compared to other professional graduate programs: Most schools expect applicant to have at least several years of full-time work experience before applying. For some young women thinking of starting a family soon, the idea of needing to build up a few years of professional momentum before even applying to school means that they may have to wait longer than they would like before having children.

This partly explains top business schools’ push to attract younger applicants (such as Harvard Business School’s HBS 2+2 Program). Early results seem to suggest that these programs are in fact attracting more women: About half of the 116 students in the program’s first year are women, compared to the full-time MBA program’s Class of 2010, which is 38% women. (And we’re proud to say that we helped a few of those women get accepted to the program!)

For more advice on getting into the world’s top business schools, be sure to subscribe to this blog and to follow us on Twitter. If you want to get your candidacy started immediately, call us at (800) 925-7737 and speak with a Veritas Prep admissions expert today!

HBS 2+2 Program Podcast

In a new podcast on the HBS web site, Assistant Director of MBA Admissions Kerry McLaughlin, interviewed Andrea Kimmel from HBS 2+2 Program admissions, and Mark Michaelman, a recent 2+2 Program admit from Northeastern University. The podcast provides a nice overview of Harvard’s rationale for launching the program last year, as well as some advice for rising college seniors who may apply to the program this summer.

Kimmel explained that the impetus for creating the HBS 2+2 Program was when the school realized who wasn’t applying to HBS. Explained Kimmel, “We realized there was a real opportunity to start to talk to younger people who maybe would never have business or an MBA degree on their radar screen.” The admissions officers especially had scientists, engineers, liberal arts majors in mind when they created the program — how to turn them on to the idea of a graduate business education before they go too far down another professional path?

Even though the HBS 2+2 Program attracted more than 630 applicants in its first admissions cycle (and admitted 106 of them), the school is aggressively promoting the program to attract an even more diverse applicant pool in the coming year. “Since launching it, we have been on over 80 college campuses, and that number continues to grow,” said Kimmel. “We’re looking forward to having an even higher number of applications in the second year.”

New admit Mark Michaelman then went on to describe the application process. Not surprisingly, the real challenge for a rising college senior is to balance schoolwork and the application process. “As long as you keep track of it and organize your schedule, it tends to be pretty straightforward.”

Kerry made a point of emphasizing that the HBS 2+2 Program will accept the GRE this coming year, which is consistent with the program’s mission to attract more applicants who may not have considered an MBA until now. In Michaelman’s case, he plans on pursuing a chemical engineering-related job for the next two years, before enrolling in HBS in the Fall of 2011. He plans on moving into a managerial position in the same field once he graduates with a Harvard MBA in 2013.

Read more about the program’s admissions essays and deadlines on our blog, and see how Veritas Prep can help you apply to the HBS 2+2 program this summer.

HBS 2+2 Program to Accept the GRE

We’ve previously weighed in on the GRE vs. GMAT question in the media. Now, one more big name among business schools plans to start accepting the test: Harvard has announced that it will accept the GRE for HBS 2+2 Program applicants starting this year.

This is consistent with the strategic aim of the HBS 2+2 Program, which is to attract more applicants who may otherwise not have considered pursuing an MBA. While many top business schools compete with HBS for high-potential applicants, HBS sees other top grad programs (especially law schools) as their main competition for top young talent. Accepting the GRE allows HBS to attract more of these applicants who may not have originally planned on pursuing a business education.

By the way, the Forbes article makes it sound as thought HBS will only accept the GRE for the 2+2 Program, but it will actually accept both. (See the HBS admissions FAQ.) If you already have a strong GMAT score, then don’t even worry about the GRE.

If you’re still in college and might eventually want to pursue a Harvard MBA, read more about the HBS 2+2 Program on our blog, and see if it’s right for you.

HBS 2+2 Program Application Essays and Deadlines Now Available

Harvard Business School has posted the admissions essays and deadlines for 2009. Here they are, taken from Harvard’s site. Our comments are in italics:

HBS 2+2 Program Application Deadline
There is just one application round for the HBS 2+2 Program. Applications must be received by July 1, 2009, at 5:00 PM Eastern time. Applicants will be notified of their admissions decisions by September 15, 2009.

HBS 2+2 Program Application Essays

  1. What are your three most substantial accomplishments and why do you view them as such? (600 words)

    This is exactly the same question on the regular HBS application. While you are obviously younger than the typical applicant, Harvard still expects to see several separate, concrete examples of how you made a positive impact on the organization, community, or people around you.

  2. What would you like us to know about your undergraduate academic experience? (400 words)

    This question is unique to the 2+2 Program application. Being that you probably don’t yet have any full-time work experience, the admissions office is willing to dig deeper into your undergraduate experience to learn more about you. Don’t simply recount your transcript here. Why did you choose your major in college? What motivated you to choose certain course? What were some things that you learned that you never expected to learn? Focus on just one or two themes here, ideally showing how you have grown academically over the past three years.

  3. What have you learned from a mistake? (400 words)

    This is also taken directly from the standard HBS application. Just like with all mistake essays, you want to show introspection (What did you learn?) and a motivation for self-improvement (How did you use what you learned to better yourself and avoid that mistake again?). While you won’t have the same experiences as a twenty-five-year-old applicant to draw upon here, look for experiences in all aspects of your life where you learned a valuable lesson.

  4. Optional Essays (choose one)

    – Discuss how you have engaged with a community or organization. (400 words)

    – What area of the world are you most curious about and why? (400 words)

    – What is your career vision and why is this choice meaningful to you? (400 words)

    All three of these are also taken from the standard HBS application. We always recommend that applicants err on the side of discussing themselves, the decisions they’ve made, and the impact they’ve made on those around them. These specific examples of your initiative and leadership are extremely valuable, especially if you are relatively inexperienced. This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t answer one of the other questions, but be careful to avoid discussing big-picture generalities that don’t let the admissions committee get to know the real you.

For more advice and information on Veritas Prep’s specialized admissions assistance for applicants who apply to the HBS 2+2 Program, visit our HBS 2+2 Program page.

HBS 2+2 Program Admissions Decisions

This just in! HBS has started to send acceptance notices to applicants who have been admitted to the first entering class of the HBS 2+2 Program. Word from our clients is that HBS first sent admissions acceptance notices by email, followed up by a congratualtory call from Dee Leopold herself.

Congrats to all members of the Veritas Prep community (and everyone else) who have made it into the HBS 2+2 Program!

The HBS 2+2 Program invites undergraduate students who have completed their junior year of college to apply for deferred admission to Harvard Business School. Admitted applicants are guaranteed a future spot at HBS after successfully graduating from college and completing two years of work experience at a participating employer. If you are a college junior and are considering applying to the program next year, read more about the HBS 2+2 Program on our blog.

HBS 2+2 Interview Invitations Sent

According to some of our own clients, last Wednesday Harvard Business School sent interview invitations to select HBS 2+2 Program applicants. (Congrats, folks!)

HBS also sent rejection letters to applicants on the same day, and in the letter the school explained that there were over 600 applicants to the program. Given the estimated number of applicants Harvard will accept, this would put the projected acceptance rate of the HBS 2+2 Program in line with the general school’s acceptance rate (in the low- to mid-teens).

Interviews are happening shortly. Good luck, everyone!

If you are an undergrad considering applying to an early MBA program, be sure to visit the Veritas Prep HBS 2+2 Program information page.

The HBS 2+2 Program

If you’re a college junior with a liberal arts bent, the HBS 2+2 Program could be right for you. This marks the first year of admissions for Harvard Business School’s new program targeting college undergrads. According to our MBA admission consulting team — which offers specialized consulting for students applying to the HBS 2+2 Program — the new program has created quite a buzz on campus.

The program has three main benefits to consider: one, it’s an ideal time to apply during your undergraduate years; two, it offers superior access to job recruiting and career advice; and three, it provides students with extra preparation in leadership and practical business skills.

Ideal time to apply: No matter how busy you feel in college while balancing coursework, sports, clubs and social commitments, you will undoubtedly be shocked to find out how busy you are once your full-time career begins. In addition, a couple years after graduating, you will probably find yourself a little rusty at test taking and essay writing. The HBS 2+2 Program application deadline comes during the summer after your junior year in college (this year it comes on July 1, 2008), which can be an optimal time to apply. You are in prime test taking and essay writing mode, you have great access to professors for recommendations, and (as hard as it may be to believe) it is probably easier to find extra time to work on those daunting, time consuming essays.

Access to job recruiting and advisors: Ask any HBS student what the most beneficial thing was about school, and toward the very top of their list would be access to world-class companies and incredible career advisors. As part of the HBS 2+2 Program, you will get access to these companies and coaches as a college senior, supplementing the recruiting opportunities already present on your undergraduate campus. Over 100 of the most prestigious companies participate in the program, eager to hire the ambitious college students accepted into the program. And while working at one of these companies, you are free to focus on your job performance without the distraction of GMAT studying and essay writing that plagues many young professionals stressed about getting into a top MBA program.

Extra preparation: During the summer preceding business school, Harvard hosts extra workshops for members of the program focused on leadership and business skills. In addition to learning critical skills that will differentiate you from other recent college graduates, you will also get to meet a phenomenal group of students who have had experiences similar to your own – a network of students who will likely remain some of your closest friends.

If you have exceptionally strong academic performance, a track record of leadership, and a desire to push yourself even further, take a closer look at the HBS 2+2 Program. Don’t worry if you don’t quite yet know what you want to be “when you grow up” or what you will do with your MBA degree. This program is designed for people like you.

If you want to ace your Harvard application, visit Veritas Prep to learn more about the specialized MBA admissions consulting we provide for HBS 2+2 Program applicants.

Harvard Announces New 2+2 Program

We wanted to bring your attention to the new deferred-admission program launched at Harvard, called the HBS 2+2 Program. The program is designed to reach out to high achieving college juniors, who can get guaranteed admission to Harvard Business School, after graduating college and accruing two years of approved work experience. It seems like a great idea, and will most likely be beneficial to both the targeted students and to HBS.

You can read all about it here.