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GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

Delusions of Grandeur

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

If you are reading this, there is a high likelihood that you are a successful person; other than the occasional Googler-gone-astray, those who find a blog that specializes in admissions for elite MBA and JD programs tend to be students or young professionals who would like to advance their careers to an even higher level. Assuming that the description fits, congratulations to you!

Filed in: GMAT Tips
GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

Practice The Way You Play

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

Sports Illustrated ran an interesting article this week about Barack Obama and the influence that the game of basketball has had on his political career. The implication — and some theorize one of the reasons that he won in the hoops-heavy states of Indiana and North Carolina — is that he governs the way he plays: getting others involved, playing defense with discipline, making the smart play, etc.

GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

Fractional Focus, Exponential Improvement

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

The very fact that the GMAT does not permit you to use a calculator should give you some insight in to the nature of the quantitative section’s emphasis – the GMAT is much less concerned with your ability to “crunch numbers” than it is with your logical skills, and the way in which you can make yourself more efficient while assessing and manipulating numbers.

Filed in: GMAT Tips
GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

A Quick First Step

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

The year was 1995. Michael Jordan was finishing a lackluster career in baseball’s minor leagues, Cal Ripken, Jr. was putting the final touches on his “perfect attendance” record, OJ Simpson was trying on gloves in a courtoom, and Hootie and the Blowfish were, evidently, writing songs about the GMAT (which was not yet being administered via computer).

GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

Don’t Swing at the First Pitch

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

This week, all eyes were on Las Vegas, as the desert oasis town received a whopping four inches of snow. For baseball fans, however, Las Vegas has been the target of much attention all month, as the Major League Baseball winter meetings took place in Sin City, a perfect place for Steinbrenners and other owners to make risky investments with millions of dollars.

Filed in: GMAT Tips
GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

Approach Geometry Questions from the Right (tri)Angle

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

As the writers of the GMAT create difficult quantitative questions, one favorite technique is to require test-takers to use skills that would not, on the surface, seem relevant. As examinees struggle to find a foothold on the question with the tools that seem more obvious by comparison, they lose time, make calculation errors, and suffer not only from an incorrect answer but also from a decreased level of confidence that carries on to future questions.

Filed in: GMAT
GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

Factoring – A Crucial Factor

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

The quantitative section of the GMAT has been fascinating to follow as it has evolved; with the need to create a more difficult section that remains consistent with its goals, the GMAT authors – who are concerned much more with your analytical ability than your propensity for ‘crunching numbers” – have begun to emphasize “number theory” to a large extent.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Tips
GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

Happy Thanksgiving! Today marks, hopefully, at least for the economy’s sake, the busiest shopping day of the year in the United States, complete with hectic parking lots, long lines, and potentially-significant savings. In fact, it’s a lot like your GMAT test date will be – stressful and frantic with the hope of a big payoff…but also with the potential to waste a lot of time and energy for naught.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Tips
GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

Think Like the GMAT Testmaker

The GMAT is a difficult exam; there’s simply no way around that fact. Knowing why it is difficult, however, will help you to better plan for it, and a fantastic way to gain that knowledge is to put yourself in the position of the writers of the exam.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Tips
GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

Variability Equals Flexibility

Often times, examinees become confused when quantitative problems use large or seemingly-abstract numbers, such as 12!, 2^17, or multi-item expressions, such as 3^(x-2). The more convoluted a value might seem, the easier it is to grow frustrated, lose focus, or simply consider the problem to be too difficult.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Tips
GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

The Shortest Distance Between Two Points…

With all of the financial happenings in New York City recently, you may not have noticed, but it’s New York City Marathon weekend (as a blogger and not a journalist, I don’t believe I’m obligated to include the sponsorship title “ING” as a prefix…my apologies to you marketing majors). It’s also the 25th anniversary of one of the most notable NYC Marathons in history, in which Rod Dixon closed a 120-meter gap in the final miles simply by running smarter than his two seemingly-stronger competitors. While the leaders ran the “blue line” marking the course in the middle of the street, Dixon ran the tangent line to each curve, effectively closing that 120-meter gap by running nearly 100 fewer meters than his competitors.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Tips
GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

Start at the Very Beginning, It’s a Very Good Place to Start

Difficult Problem Solving questions often intimidate examinees who quickly become overwhelmed by the number of potential variables and figures that they face. It sounds trite, but top test-takers almost uniformly share one characteristic: they begin by identifying what they know, rather than worrying about what they do not. Simply by writing down the information that you know, you will find yourself in a position to solve for the next-easiest unknown, and from there you will build a knowledge base from which to work toward the correct answer.

Filed in: GMAT
GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

Only is the Same as Always (in this regard)

Most test-takers know to be careful when encountering universal modifiers (all, none, never, always) in Critical Reasoning problems. Similarly, less-noticeable words like

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Tips
GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

Is That Your Final Answer?

When down to two answer choices on a Verbal question, it

Filed in: GMAT
GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

Transition Yourself to Better Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension passages tend to contain quite a few confusing and intimidating words, including technical scientific terms and academic literary devices. While examinees often become hung up on those words, you should pay more attention to the words with which you should be quite familiar — those that signal transitions in an argument. By looking for words such as

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Tips
GMAT Tip of the Week

GMAT Tip of the Week

(This is one of a series of GMAT tips that we offer on our blog.)

When You Assume, You

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Tips