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5 Ways to Score Above 700 on the SAT Writing Section

5 Ways to Score Above 700 on the SAT Writing Section

Last week, we talked about 5 ways to score higher in math, and this week we’ll take a look at how to do that in the writing section. It’s actually easier than it sounds! I used to personally loathe (hate) this section of the SAT.  I would have anxiety dreams about it: a giant semicolon would be trying to eat me and my children (I don’t have children). As time went by, however, I found that there is no need to fear as there are concrete steps that you can take to ace this section of the SAT. Here are 5 tips to help you succeed on the writing section of the SAT:

5 Ways to Score Above 700 on the SAT Math Section

5 Ways to Score Above 700 on the SAT Math Section

The SAT, one of the most loathed and feared tests for high school students, can feel impossible to conquer.  For many ambitious young people, above 700 on math is the holy grail of scores: you hear that it can be achieved but actually reaching it seems impossible.  Dear friend: fear not!  The grail has been found and there are concrete steps that can be taken to help you achieve above a 700 on the math portion of SAT.

SAT Tip of the Week: How to Strengthen your Approach to Passage-Based Questions

SAT Tip of the Week: How to Strengthen your Approach to Passage-Based Questions

The Reading Section is often considered the most difficult section of the SAT. Here’s a game-changing tip from a Veritas Prep SAT 2400 tutor that’s guaranteed to boost your score.

At Veritas Prep, we’ve made it our mission to teach students how to simplify their approach to the Reading Section. In particular, students struggle with the passage-based questions because of the sheer amount of information they have to process, as well as the difficulty they face in choosing the most ‘logical ‘answer choice. After all, a passage-based question isn’t like a math question with only one possible answer, right?

SAT Tip of the Week: Use Your Gut and Your Brain to Get a High Score

SAT Tip of the Week: Use Your Gut and Your Brain to Get a High Score

You’ve always been a person who trusts your gut.  You’ve got good instincts, everyone says so.  It’s why you were such an early adopter on Instagramming pictures of your dog dressed as different fruits and why you knew not to eat the “cold noodles” at the sketchy Chinese food place on the corner that sent your friends into an abdominal abyss for days, so it’s no wonder you’re so good at tests.  You just pick the answer that feels right, and most of the time, your feeling is right! Great, right? WRONG!

SAT Tip of the Week: Be Specific in Your Answer Choices

SAT Tip of the Week: Be Specific in Your Answer Choices

Once again there are two answer choices that seem equally alluring and dangerous.  You know your stuff: the answer is always in the passage, but as you look at the two choices with growing unease you remember both statements being discussed.  Which one is it? Which one is supreme!

This is a common situation that many students face during the reading comprehension section of the SAT.  The first and golden rule of the SAT reading section is that the answer is always in the passage.  If the passage doesn’t mention it, or accomplish the task that the question indicates, it is NOT the correct answer.  However, our understanding cannot stop here!  It is not just mentioning something in the passage that makes an answer choice correct, it is the presence of evidence to support that the answer choice is 100% true in the section being referenced.

SAT Tip of the Week: How to Improve Your Timing When You're Stuck on a Hard Question

SAT Tip of the Week: How to Improve Your Timing When You're Stuck on a Hard Question

Before getting into test prep, I was a classical music composer.  I worked pretty long hours composing pieces for solo instruments, chamber ensembles, and symphony orchestras.  Sometimes I would run into writer’s blocks at very specific places in a composition.  I couldn’t decide which motive the oboe should play, or whether or not to double the counterpoint on the harp.  How I found my way out of such binds is also how I later found my way out of tough questions on standardized tests like the SAT.

SAT Tip of the Week: 5 Ways to Write a Better Essay

SAT Tip of the Week: 5 Ways to Write a Better Essay

Twenty-five minutes to complete the essay portion of the SAT seems like an impossible feat, but with the right preparation you can tackle this task with ease. Writing an essay usually requires a great deal of time, information gathering, planning, and drafting, but you can still pull off a well-written essay that will give you the score you are yearning for.

SAT Tip of the Week: Beware of Tricky Wording in SAT Math Questions

SAT Tip of the Week: Beware of Tricky Wording in SAT Math Questions

Many times, our talented and accomplished students report that they know all of the math concepts on the SAT and are fully capable of solving all of the problems.  However, they frequently complain that they make “dumb” or “careless” mistakes on the SAT and lose points.  While some of these mistakes seem silly in hindsight, many of the questions on the SAT are designed to lure students into tricks and traps or force errors if the students are not paying close attention to the wording.

SAT Tip of the Week: Avoid Traps in Sentence Correction

SAT Tip of the Week: Avoid Traps in Sentence Correction

The SAT is a standardized test, which means that it aims to be an objective measure of performance for test-takers regardless of whether the test is taken in October or May and regardless of which version of the test is taken.  The actual questions on the test might change, but the SAT needs to allow college admissions officer to confidently compare the score of a student who took the October SAT to the score of a student who takes the May SAT even though the two students will see different questions on the tests.

SAT Tip of the Week: Avoid this Common Error

SAT Tip of the Week: Avoid this Common Error

If you’ve been reading our articles, you already know that there are only so many techniques and tricks that the SAT can use to make questions difficult.  On the writing multiple-choice section, there about only a dozen grammar and style rules that you need to know in order to get a perfect Writing score.  On the SAT, it is particularly important to pay attention to one specific punctuation mark:  the comma.

SAT Tip of the Week: How Missy Elliot Can Raise Your Math Score

SAT Tip of the Week: How Missy Elliot Can Raise Your Math Score

Next time you’re doing a practice SAT math problem, you might just find that it could be helpful to channel a little Missy Elliott from her classic hit song “Work It” and ask yourself “Is it worth it?  Let me work it.  I put my thing down flip it and reverse it.”  Let’s explain.

The SAT is primarily a reasoning test as opposed to a test you might see in high school.  On the math section, although the SAT tests some math, it primarily tests reasoning skills and students abilities to think critically with math as the common language.  SAT math questions will rarely be the straightforward type that you see on high school math tests.

SAT Tip of the Week: Identifying Sentence Errors

SAT Tip of the Week: Identifying Sentence Errors

Once again you find yourself staring at an “Identifying Sentence Error” problem.  You are prepared! You have in your arsenal all the common errors that occur on the SAT. You know to avoid the common indicators of awkward phrasing and you can identify a subject and verb disagreement with both eyes closed and two hands and a foot tied behind your back.

SAT Tip of the Week: Brainstorming for Your Essay

SAT Tip of the Week: Brainstorming for Your Essay

It’s easy to jump an extra point on the SAT essay when you’ve got specific, relevant examples. Good logical reasoning can definitely help you get a better score, but if you can combine your solid logic with powerful, concrete, real-world examples, you’ll be well on your way to a 12!

To do this, create an “Example Chart” like the one pictured below, and add at least 3-5 items to each category. Choose things that you are an expert in, not ones that necessarily sound the most scholarly.

SAT Tip of the Week: Tackle Reading Comprehension Questions

SAT Tip of the Week: Tackle Reading Comprehension Questions

One benefit to the Reading Comprehension questions on the SAT test is that not every passage is nine paragraphs long. You’ll come across short passages – alone, and in pairs. Less reading time leaves more time for analysis and careful study of the questions posed. Remember that you can complete the questions within any SAT section in any order, so if the longer passages stress you out, you might want to tackle the shorter ones to get your brain “warmed up.”

SAT Tip of the Week: 6 Verb Tenses on the SAT

SAT Tip of the Week: 6 Verb Tenses on the SAT

The most common way verbs are tested on the SAT is in subject-verb agreement, however sometimes Identifying Sentence Errors will contain other verb errors. While it’s important to make sure that verbs always agree with their subject in number, it is also important to check to make sure that the verb tense makes logical sense in the context of the sentence.

SAT Tip of the Week: 6 Ways to Get a High Score

SAT Tip of the Week: 6 Ways to Get a High Score

Studying for the SAT may feel daunting, but remember that this test has been around in one form or another since 1926, and its latest format was introduced back in 2005. That means millions of students have taken the exam, gotten high scores, and gone on to attend their dream school. Here’s what you can do to be among those high-scoring students:

SAT Tip of the Week: Punt Your Way to a Higher Score

SAT Tip of the Week: Punt Your Way to a Higher Score

While our SAT program is called SAT 2400 and trains students to successfully get perfect scores on the SAT, in the wider world of all SAT test-takers, only a small percentage of test takers can get close to a perfect 2400.

Depending on your college goals, you may not be targeting a perfect 2400 and may just need a certain score to qualify to get recruited to a sports team or another special program at a college.  As a result, if you’re scoring under 1500 on the SAT and want a quick and easy boost to you score, it might be advantageous for you to use the “Punt Strategy” on the SAT.

SAT Tip of the Week: 4 Tips to Solve Pie Chart Questions

SAT Tip of the Week: 4 Tips to Solve Pie Chart Questions

The SAT Math section is guaranteed to have some Data Analysis questions. These questions can take several forms: tables, graphs, charts, etc. These figures may look intimidating, but most of the questions that follow them require relatively easy algebra skills: setting up equations, finding percentages or averages, and using substitution. To do well on Pie Chart (also called Circle Graph) questions, follow these basic tips:

SAT Tip of the Week: 5 Ways to Conquer Test Anxiety

SAT Tip of the Week: 5 Ways to Conquer Test Anxiety

The SAT is often the first major standardized exam that many students take. It is their first footstep into the world of higher education. Because of the horror stories of the infamous SAT that circle around high school lunchrooms across the nation, fledgling juniors and seniors who haven’t taken the exam can feel a lot of pressure on test day. Here are 5 ways to get rid of that unnecessary stress:

SAT Tip of the Week: 3 Types of Antecedent Errors

SAT Tip of the Week: 3 Types of Antecedent Errors

The word “antecedent” in grammar refers to a noun that a pronoun takes the place of, and since we see a lot of pronouns on the SAT Writing questions, we see a lot of antecedents. There are three main ways antecedents can make an Improving Sentences or Identifying Sentence Error statement wrong: by not agreeing in number with its pronoun, by offering more than one possible antecedent, or by not being present in the sentence at all! Let’s brush up on our antecedent knowledge, then we’ll examine these errors:

SAT Tip of the Week: Scientific Notation and Exponents

SAT Tip of the Week: Scientific Notation and Exponents

Scientific Notation is not a heavily-tested concept on the SAT (whew!) – and you might not see it at all! But it’s definitely useful to review, and it’s a concept that goes hand-in-hand with understanding exponents.

Large numbers and very small decimals are often expressed with exponents using scientific notation. Scientific notation means expressing a number as a product of a decimal and the number 10 raised to a certain power. The reason scientific notation is used is that is saves space. Who would want to write .000000000000000000547, when 5.47 x 1019 saves us a lot more room?

SAT Tip of the Week: Memorizing Math Formulas

SAT Tip of the Week: Memorizing Math Formulas

The SAT Math sections test three distinct categories of measurement: Perimeter, Area, and Volume. Luckily, many formulas are provided for you at the front of each Math section, but if you do enough practice problems, you’ll soon have these need-to-know formulas committed to memory, and won’t waste valuable test-time flipping pages.  Memorizing these formulas is also great practice for the ACT if you plan to take it, since unlike the SAT, the ACT exam does NOT provide them for you!

SAT Tip of the Week: How I Scored a 2350 on the SAT in 5 Easy Steps

SAT Tip of the Week: How I Scored a 2350 on the SAT in 5 Easy Steps

In March of 2006, I took the SAT for the first and only time and scored a 2350. I was very excited to score so well, and would like to share some of my study tips with you! So, without further ado…

1.) My Number One tip: Practice! Take lots of practice tests – and not just any practice tests, but tests that are written by the College Board.  If you don’t have one, I highly recommend buying a copy of the Official SAT Study Guide, so you can practice using material that’s actually written by the makers of the SAT. I can’t emphasize enough how helpful practice tests are: the more you practice, the more you’ll get used to the pacing of a four-hour test, the timing element of the test, the strange and SAT-specific question types that tend to pop up, etc. So, practice, practice, practice!

SAT Tip of the Week: How to Solve 3 Types of Algebra Problems

SAT Tip of the Week: How to Solve 3 Types of Algebra Problems

Algebra problems on the SAT may take several forms, but they generally involve some variation on solving for a variable or expression.   In this article, I will break down the process of working through a few variations of those lovely “solve for x” or “what is the value of x?” types of problems.

4 Tips to Find the Main Idea in SAT Passages

4 Tips to Find the Main Idea in SAT Passages

It’s important to keep in mind for all SAT Reading Comprehension questions that just because an SAT answer choice is reasonable, true, or mentioned in the SAT reading passage, does not mean it is automatically correct. Always ask yourself: which answer choice in this SAT question best addresses this specific question being asked? To be able to answer “Main Idea” questions, try to adopt these quick tips:

SAT Tip of the Week: How to Identify Preposition Errors in SAT Writing

SAT Tip of the Week: How to Identify Preposition Errors in SAT Writing

Many students find that prepositional phrases are the bane of their existence on the writing section of the SAT.  This is because the SAT likes to use propositional phrases to confuse the test-taker’s ear by adding a bunch of words in between the subject and verb or the pronoun and the antecedent.  The good news is that, armed with foreknowledge, you can catch the test-writers at their game and never get fooled again.  Here’s what you need to know…

Why Good Students Score Poorly on SAT Math - Part V

Why Good Students Score Poorly on SAT Math - Part V

Today we’ll finish up our 5-part series on SAT math tips for smart students who are struggling to keep their SAT math scores high. In Part I we learned that the result is rewarded, not the effort. Part II taught us that SAT math problems can be very tricky, Part III showed us why the SAT math section is unlike what you’ve seen before, and in Part IV we saw how perfectionism can hurt you on test day. Today, we’ll take a closer look into overconfidence.

Why Good Students Score Poorly on SAT Math - Part IV

Why Good Students Score Poorly on SAT Math - Part IV

Today we continue a 5-part series on SAT math tips for smart students who are struggling to keep their SAT math scores high. In Part I we learned that the result is rewarded, not the effort. Part II taught us that SAT math problems can be very tricky, and in Part III we looked at why the SAT math section is unlike what you’ve seen before. Today, we’ll see how perfectionism can hurt you on test day.

Why Good Students Score Poorly on SAT Math - Part III

Why Good Students Score Poorly on SAT Math - Part III

Today we continue a 5-part series on SAT math tips for smart students who are struggling to keep their SAT math scores high. In Part I we learned that the result is rewarded, not the effort. Part II taught us that SAT math problems can be very tricky. Today, we’ll look at why the SAT math section is unlike anything you’ve ever come across.

SAT Tip of the Week: Combining Sentences

SAT Tip of the Week: Combining Sentences

In context, which of the following is the best way to combine sentences 1 and 2 (reproduced below)?

Marriage was once a sacred religious institution authorized only by sacred establishments. In contemporary times the concept of marriage has become more of a state convention and less of a holy bond.

SAT Tip of the Week: Practice Makes Perfect

SAT Tip of the Week: Practice Makes Perfect

As the old saying goes, “practice makes perfect”.  It is true. Human beings are designed to improve, learn, and excel through rigorous and mindful practice. In addition to teaching, I also dance. When I was younger, dance class was simply a fun activity to do after school. I have come to learn now that I need to practice consciously every single day if I want to excel at dance and succeed.

3 Tips for Keeping Your Cool on Test Day

3 Tips for Keeping Your Cool on Test Day

Your outlook on test day is probably something like this: Oh no; it’s here. The test is this weekend. That big test. The one I’ve been partially dreading and partially waiting for just so I can get it over with. I’m a little nervous, no, a lot nervous. Isn’t this test supposed to decide my life or something? Isn’t this the test that determines whether or not I’ll get into a good college?

SAT Tip of the Week: Solving Permutation Questions

SAT Tip of the Week: Solving Permutation Questions

On the SAT, you’ll see a handful of permutation questions. Permutation questions deal with the rearranging of existing elements. Let’s look at an example problem. The problem goes something like this “A northeastern (museum/school/restaurant) has four (displays/desks/seats) all in a row.  How many different combinations of six (paintings/students/diners) can be made?”

SAT Tip of the Week: Avoiding Assumptions

SAT Tip of the Week: Avoiding Assumptions

Avoiding Assumptions is probably the best strategy period on SAT Reading. But it will take a long time before you master this strategy. You will need to practice the art of avoiding assumptions over and over on SAT passages until you perfect it.

Remember that an assumption is an induction that is not based on textual evidence from the passage. So how can you avoid making assumptions on the SAT? Well, you can ask yourself one magic question:

SAT Tip of the Week: 4 Tips to Solve Hard Math Problems

SAT Tip of the Week: 4 Tips to Solve Hard Math Problems

So here we are, the moment of truth.  We have been feverishly studying for the last six months.  We don’t blink when we see capricious and capacious sitting next to each other in the completing sentences portion, knowing that we are looking for a synonym to whimsical (caprice means whim) not roomy or spacious (capa, like capacity).