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Angles in Data Sufficiency

Angles in Data Sufficiency

The GMAT is an exam steeped in logic, deduction and understanding. In order to succeed on the exam, you should be able to look at any given question objectively and determine what it is asking, and where the traps may lie. Now, this is akin to asking you to navigate a labyrinth while avoiding the Minotaur: just because you know the rules, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you will be successful. Taking the labyrinth as a metaphor, how can you rise to the challenge put forth in front of you?

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An Introduction to Two-Part Analysis Questions in Integrated Reasoning

An Introduction to Two-Part Analysis Questions in Integrated Reasoning

Two-Part Analysis questions, or TPA, (one of four question-types in the IR section) present a short paragraph with information. Answer choices will be presented in several columns and rows. Each column stands for a component, and each row is part of the solution. You’ll need to choose one answer from each column.

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Mind the Gap in GMAT Critical Reasoning Questions

Mind the Gap in GMAT Critical Reasoning Questions

GMAT students can now benefit from a new series featuring video tips from Veritas Prep’s own Brian Galvin. Last week, Brian shared a tip for mastering Data Sufficiency.

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Sentence Correction: Process of Elimination on the GMAT

Sentence Correction: Process of Elimination on the GMAT

Summer blockbuster season is upon us, and one of the joys of the movies is to go see an ambitious motion picture on the big screen and get immersed in a world of make-believe for a few hours (this kind of sounds like taking the GMAT, doesn’t it?). If you’re going by yourself or with another person, you can usually agree on a movie pretty quickly and be on your way. However, if you’ve ever tried to go see a movie with like six friends, it often becomes a case of Process of Elimination.

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Identifying Assumptions on the GMAT

Identifying Assumptions on the GMAT

Do you find yourself with your head in your hands after yet another series of practice questions, looking at a less than 50% hit-rate on Assumption questions? You’re not alone! Most of us have no background with formal logic prior to the GMAT, and suddenly we’re expected to understand brand-new concepts like premise, conclusion, flaw, etc. intuitively. To start with, let’s review some basic definitions.

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How to Succeed on the GMAT

How to Succeed on the GMAT

Competition is as inherent in nature as life itself.  Darwinian natural selection is an exercise in pure competition among and within various species.  War is an extension of this brand of competition.  War, it happens, has also contributed to some of the most momentous developments throughout history.  Not only have civilizations risen and fallen, some of the most incredible progress and regress has come from battles for supremacy.  Many of our oldest surviving texts were written to preserve the memory of major wars, and many technologies have arisen from the desire for victory, in battle or in life.  This notion of competition has evolved and spread into more modern forms — business, sports, politics, and even academics.  A wise student will see a similar kind of competition manifested in the GMAT.

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How to Master Data Sufficiency

How to Master Data Sufficiency

Students prepping for the GMAT now have the opportunity to learn from video tips, in addition to the text articles from our blog. Brian Galvin is a main collaborator on all of the Veritas Prep materials, and in these videos he will share his tips and expertise so you can quickly learn how to master the GMAT.

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Find the Quickest Way to Solve for X on the GMAT

Find the Quickest Way to Solve for X on the GMAT

I like to compare the GMAT to everyday things that hopefully resonate with people. To that end, I often like to use the analogy of routes to work to compare the different methods one can use to get the answer to a question. Invariably, there are multiple ways to get to the right answer on a math question, just as there are multiple ways to get to work. Some are just more direct than others. If I work on the island of Manhattan and live on the island of Manhattan, I can detour through The Bronx to get to work, but I’ll probably waste a lot of time. However, that doesn’t mean that I won’t get there, so it is an acceptable route for work. Of course, most of us are usually looking for the quickest way to get to work (for some reason my boss gets testy when I show up 3 hours late).

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How to Solve a Two-Part Analysis Question

How to Solve a Two-Part Analysis Question

Got the basics of the Integrated Reasoning formats, and ready to start with some questions? The Two-Part Analysis question is one of the most straight-forward IR question types. A short paragraph is followed by information in columns and rows. You’ll be asked to choose one answer from each column since the complete answer will have a “two-part” solution. Let’s look at a sample Two-Part Analysis question!

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Parallel Reasoning Strategies: Part III

Parallel Reasoning Strategies: Part III

Now that we’ve got the what and the how from Part 1 and Part 2, let’s tackle a full question!

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How to Determine the Author's Scope

How to Determine the Author's Scope

In writing a weekly column for Veritas Prep, I try to cover topics and subjects that will help you avoid common pitfalls on the GMAT. The exam uses certain common traps and therefore it is better to review them routinely in order to be prepared to deal with such adversity on test day. Every type of question on the exam can have pitfalls and I’d like to cover the major ones in every question type. Today, we’ll take a look at Reading Comprehension.  

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Parallel Reasoning Strategies: Part II

Parallel Reasoning Strategies: Part II

Frustrated by Parallel Reasoning questions, even after lots of practice? I don’t blame you! It’s tough to tackle 6 arguments instead of 1, especially if pacing on the Verbal section is challenging for you. In Part I of this series, we looked at how to define parallel reasoning questions on the GMAT. Today let’s take a look at 3 steps to take in order to get these questions correct!

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8 Steps to an 8 on the Integrated Reasoning Section

8 Steps to an 8 on the Integrated Reasoning Section

Springtime has always been a reason to celebrate – we’re recently through Mother’s Day and Memorial Day, and on to “Dads and Grads” and wedding season.  Oh, and next week the GMAT’s Integrated Reasoning section turns one year old.  So grab your party hats and noisemakers and get ready for some sloppy cake eating…let’s celebrate the Integrated Reasoning section’s first birthday with 8 strategies to help you get a perfect 8 on that section.

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How to Find the Sum of Integers on the GMAT

How to Find the Sum of Integers on the GMAT

In the quant section of the GMAT, there are a fair number of formulae to know in order to answer the ensemble of questions that may be asked of you. Most of them are covered in any basic test prep material, but a formula is always just a short hand version of a much longer manual process.

There is an anecdote about a primary school teacher who wanted to keep a misbehaved child busy for a period, so she asked him to sum up all the numbers from 1 to 100. To her dismay, the child answered the question in a matter of seconds, and the answer was correct. The child explained to his teacher that, instead of simply adding 1+2+3…, you could create a pairwise addition that would always yield the same number. If you added 1 to 100, you would get 101. If you added 2 to 99, you would still get 101. If you added 3 to 98, you’d still get 101, and so on. Thus the addition of 100 different numbers could be turned into a multiplication of two simple numbers: 101 x 50. The student in question was mathematical prodigy Carl Friedrich Gauss.

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The Secret to Solving Word Problems

The Secret to Solving Word Problems

Word Problems tend to intimidate newcomers to the GMAT.  Don’t be scared!  The math on most word problems is actually easier and less troublesome than the math on a straightforward arithmetic or algebra problem.

The reason the math is easier on these problems is because the problem is made hard in other ways.  Word problems are considered hard because you have to convert a word problem into a math question.  This involves good reading skills and good critical reasoning skills.

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Recognizing Illogical Modifiers on the GMAT

Recognizing Illogical Modifiers on the GMAT

Without descriptive words, phrases or clauses, sentences lack color.   A misstep of many is not paying close enough attention to the proper placement of modifiers.    The makers of the GMAT are aware of this shortsightedness of many test-takers.  As a result, they do test your ability to recognize illogical modifiers.

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Parallel Reasoning Strategies: Part I

Parallel Reasoning Strategies: Part I

Parallel Reasoning questions on the Critical Reasoning section of the GMAT are a type of “method of reasoning” question-type. These questions require you to focus on the author’s logic. Parallel reasoning questions ask you to look for the answer choice that has the closest logical structure as the argument in the question stem. Ask yourself: which choice best matches the WAY the author moves from the evidence to his conclusion?

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Conclusions are Key in Critical Reasoning

Conclusions are Key in Critical Reasoning

Critical reasoning questions on the GMAT tend to follow the same structure over and over again. This means that they can be answered the same way over and over again (like the movie Groundhog Day, but with words!). The first step is to determine which type of question you’re dealing with, which is why identifying the category is the first step towards successfully answering the question. The four major categories can be remembered with the mnemonic SWIM:

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4 Tips to Bring Relief to Your GMAT Studies

4 Tips to Bring Relief to Your GMAT Studies

Any worthwhile MBA program is bound to cause some stress in the life of a student. Remember: if your MBA program didn’t challenge you at the highest level, it wouldn’t be worth it. That said, sometimes we make it hard on ourselves to de-stress in our GMAT study plan. Procrastination, lack of sleep, and taking on too much work are the most often-blamed culprits. If you find yourself “burning the candle at both ends,” try these techniques to bring a little relief!

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Quadrilaterals on the GMAT

Quadrilaterals on the GMAT

On GMAT Test Day, you will likely see at least a few quadrilaterals tested. Quadrilaterals, like other shapes in Geometry, usually appear in Geometry questions that involve basic properties of quadrilaterals, perimeter, or area. Like most Geometry, all it takes is some memorization and a little practice!

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What The Great Gatsby Can Teach you About the GMAT

What The Great Gatsby Can Teach you About the GMAT

I, for one, am very excited about the new Baz Luhrmann adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatbsy.” Re-reading the book in anticipation of today’s opening, I was struck by the differences in character between Jay Gatsby and the protagonist Nick Carraway, especially evinced by this exchange from Chapter 6:

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GMAT Data Sufficiency Powers and Roots

GMAT Data Sufficiency Powers and Roots

Even if you know the basic rules for questions involving powers and roots, it’s still common to feel some intimidation towards harder-looking GMAT questions.

The “” symbol is called the “radical” symbol. You may know the square root, but how comfortable are you with cube roots? For instance:

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Conceptual Thinking on the GMAT

Conceptual Thinking on the GMAT

A common complaint I hear from students is: “I’m not good at algebra”. Full disclosure, algebra isn’t my favorite topic either. Although algebra is a powerful tool for solving many questions on the GMAT, it is rarely the only means available to solve a given math problem.

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The Importance of the Question Stem

The Importance of the Question Stem

There are so many types of Critical Reasoning questions that sometimes it’s confusing to tell your Method of Reasoning from your Argument Structure! Students are always instructed to read the question stems first and discern the specific category of CR question from them, but there’s another more important reason to hone in on the specific wording of the question stem: it gives away the answer!         

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The Secret to Causation/Correlation

The Secret to Causation/Correlation

You’ve probably read about or seen CR questions that confuse “causation” with “correlation,” but what does it mean in the real world? And why does it matter?

In statistics, let’s say we have data from two variables: x and y. They have a direct relationship. As one increases, the other increases. This could lead scientists to draw a conclusion that one variable causes the change in the other variable. But this isn’t necessary true! In fact, some third variable may be affecting both x and y! In order to prove causation and validate that one variable is indeed directly influencing the other and is the reason behind the detected correlation, further studies would need to be conducted, altering parameters, and recording outcomes.

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What's Your Study Style?

What's Your Study Style?

Not sure how to make adjustments in your GMAT study plan? Take this short quiz to find out what kind of student you are! Once you determine your study style, you can make small adjustments in your study plan to help you become more efficient in your GMAT prep!

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How Prom Relates to Sentence Correction on the GMAT

How Prom Relates to Sentence Correction on the GMAT

Preparing to take the GMAT exam is a journey that requires patience, dedication and the ability to maintain focus over a long period. Taking the exam is the culmination of a long journey that may have lasted months if not years. The approaching test day has caused a few sleepless nights for many as that circled date on the calendar loomed ever closer. This entire experience might remind you of another similar rite of passage that many of us have gone through: The prom. (Unsubstantiated rumor: new American Pie movie will revolve around taking the GMAT)

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AWA Essay Guide

AWA Essay Guide

The Argument Essay definitely allows for some flexibility, but it helps if you have a memorized template going in, because then there’s no risk of being “stuck.” Below is a sample outline. If you are an adept writer, you may wish to place your “How to Strengthen” paragraph on its own right before the Conclusion, and then have a separate shorter Conclusion. Click here for tips on writing your essay. 

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4 Tips for Difficult Word Problems on the GMAT

4 Tips for Difficult Word Problems on the GMAT

Word problems on the GMAT often do not require particularly difficult algebra to solve. Most of the time, solving simple linear equations or using a formula is all that is required. The key is to not be intimidated by the length of the description and to be able to pull out the relevant information and set up the correct equation/s. These 4 tips will help you tackle any Problem Solving question that is significantly wordy.

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7 Tips for Writing Your Argument Essay

7 Tips for Writing Your Argument Essay

The AWA section of the GMAT is made up of one short piece of writing called the “Argument” essay. It essentially asks you to evaluate an argument, usually a type of proposal. The main qualities that the readers look for are the organization of your ideas, the quality of the ideas themselves, the strength and relevance of the examples, and your grasp of standard written English. According to GMAC, the “Analysis of an Argument tests your ability to formulate an appropriate and constructive critique of a specific conclusion based on a specific line of thinking.” With that, let’s take a look at a few helpful tips:

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Mental Calculations on the GMAT

Mental Calculations on the GMAT

One of the reasons calculators aren’t allowed on the GMAT is to ensure that people are really thinking about the numbers they are using to solve problems. Being at ease with mental math is a skill that has been slowly eroded since the advent and subsequent ubiquity of the calculator in the education process (sadly my frequent calls to bring back the abacus have gone unheeded). Too often, people mindlessly type in numbers, and don’t even notice if they hit the wrong number or a button gets pressed twice. Of course 5*6=45, the machine told me so! (Dependence on machines also eventually leads to Skynet) However, being good at mental math can be helped along if you already have a good idea which numbers you might expect to see on test day.

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Master the Geometry Section of the GMAT

Master the Geometry Section of the GMAT

Need better scores on GMAT Geometry questions? The GMAT loves triangles (no offense, circles). With a clear set of rules and formulas which govern their construction, they are lean, mean, Plane Geometry-machines. Get ANY question with a triangle right as long as you know its foundational properties. Let’s review!

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Kobe's Achilles Injury and GMAT Perseverance

Kobe's Achilles Injury and GMAT Perseverance

As the basketball playoffs get underway, the LA Lakers are present once again.  While they’re missing their star player, let’s take a moment to reflect on how he helped get them there – and how it can help you on the GMAT.  In the entire history of basketball, perhaps no one has been a better example of focus and perseverance than Kobe Bryant.  And if there’s one thing you’ll need to be successful on the GMAT, it’s a good dose of Kobe-esque grit and determination.  What lessons can we take from the legend to use in our own preparation and game day execution?

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Breaking Down GMAT Modifier Questions

Breaking Down GMAT Modifier Questions

On the GMAT, an exam about reasoning and logic, there are few things more frustrating than long sentences punctuated by a host of modifiers, particularly prepositional phrases, participial phrases and appositive phrases, to say nothing of relative clauses. Sentence correction questions are about making sure there are no mistakes in a given sentence, and the more commas and modifiers a sentence has, the more difficult it is to ascertain whether or not it is structured correctly (hint: ~80% of the time, it’s not).

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Process of Elimination with Sherlock Holmes

Process of Elimination with Sherlock Holmes

Is anyone else as obsessed with the BBC’s Sherlock as I am? In addition to the amazingly well-plotted stories and the awesome performances in this latest carnation, Sherlock Holmes is a character we can’t seem to get enough of. From the prime-time CBS version “Elementary” to the Guy Richie movies starring Robert Downey Jr., the deer-stalker-wearing sleuth is everywhere! So how can we apply his powers of deduction to even the most dreaded GMAT Critical Reasoning question? By following this famous Sherlock quote:

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Dealing with Except Critical Reasoning Questions

Dealing with Except Critical Reasoning Questions

GMAT students often get CR problems that use words like “EXCEPT” or “NOT” in their question-stems wrong, and it definitely makes sense why. If we can’t really understand what a question is asking, how can we even begin to solve it? Let’s break down a tough one together.

A greater number of sports magazine subscriptions are sold in Town A than are sold in Town B. Therefore, the citizens of Town A are better informed about international sporting competitions than are the citizens of Town B.

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5 Tips for Dealing with Data Interpretation in Integrated Reasoning

5 Tips for Dealing with Data Interpretation in Integrated Reasoning

The new GMAT Integrated Reasoning section contain four question-types, several of which require the interpretation of data given in graphs and tables. Data analysis is not a skill required on the GMAT Quant section, so this is new to many students. What skills can we bring to these 12 questions? Here are some hot tips!

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5 Properties of Zero

5 Properties of Zero

I spend a disproportionate amount of time thinking about the GMAT. It’s a very interesting exam that can be thought of from multiple angles. Most people see it as an obstacle to be surmounted in an effort to get into the business school of their choice. Some people see it as an unfortunate barrier to their future plans. Personally, I like to think of it as an opportunity to test your reasoning skills against an unseen test maker (who you can think of as the Wizard Oz from the namesake movie). Your goal is to stay one step ahead of the test and predict the traps that will be laid out for you as you answer questions.

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Integrated Reasoning Table Analysis: Put on your Sorting Hat!

Integrated Reasoning Table Analysis: Put on your Sorting Hat!

Fans of the “Harry Potter” franchise know that the Sorting Hat magically determines which of the four school houses each new student is to be assigned at Hogwarts. This Hat has to take into account data on every new Hogwarts student, and somehow be able to tell a Gryffindor from a Slytherin! Similarly, on the “Table Analysis” questions in the Integrated Reasoning section on the GMAT, you are required to sift through data and draw conclusions. We may not have magic to help us, but sorting data isn’t as complicated as it sounds.

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Tough Inference Questions on the GMAT

Tough Inference Questions on the GMAT

Application questions are a very specific type of Inference question. They ask us to go one step further; we must apply what we have read in the passage to a new or hypothetical situation. For these tougher Inference questions, it’s important to ignore the answer choices until you’ve effectively broken down and made sense of the relevant parts of the passage.

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