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How to Solve Combinatorics Questions on the GMAT

How to Solve Combinatorics Questions on the GMAT

Of all the topics on the GMAT quant section, few get students as confused as the concept of combinatorics. The concept of going to the store and picking up one of four possible gifts for a niece is pretty straightforward (she generally likes Barbies© or My Little Pony© toys), but picking up two toys out of four for your twin nieces and then deciding which one gets which often deteriorates into an exercise of brute force combinatorics.

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1 Need to Know Formula for Sets on the GMAT

1 Need to Know Formula for Sets on the GMAT

I don’t know about you, but when I see formulas for sets that look like P(A) + P(B) + P(C) – 2P(A n B) – 2P(A n C) – 2P(B n C) + 3P(A n B n C), it takes me a minute for my brain to recall exactly what all these signs and symbols mean.

Even if we’re die-hard GMAT-ers, we’re just not used to seeing that many sets questions on practice tests, so while we know n = intersection and u = union, these formulas are just not easy to recall or employ.

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A Shortcut for Rectangular Solids Questions on the GMAT

A Shortcut for Rectangular Solids Questions on the GMAT

Quant questions on the GMAT occasionally ask us to find the length of the longest distance between two vertices in a rectangular solid. To solve these, usually we solve by (1) drawing the figure to visualize it, and (2) carefully applying the Pythagorean Theorem twice.

For example:

In a cube with a side length of 12 cm, A is the midpoint of an edge that lies on the base and B is the midpoint of a vertical edge. What is the greatest possible distance between A and B rounded to the nearest integer?

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How to Solve Critical Reasoning Questions on the GMAT

How to Solve Critical Reasoning Questions on the GMAT

A quote often attributed to (2nd US President) John Adams states that “facts are stubborn things”. In everyday life, we are often confronted with various personal opinions or subjective viewpoints on everything from politics (more horses and bayonets or less?) to fashion (can you believe what Miley Cyrus wore last week) to love (you complete me). However everyone understands that personal opinions are, well, personal. They vary from one individual to another and two people can have completely different beliefs on the exact same issue.

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Getting Back to the Basics: Circles

Getting Back to the Basics: Circles

The Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week” may have more thrills than the GMAT, but the jaws of those deadly sea-predators are a great inspiration to look at one of the GMAT’s own mysterious creatures: circles. Since we miss Shark Week around here, we give you “Arc Week” today.

When it comes to circles, most of us are old pros at finding the area and circumference, and setting up basic ratios and proportions with the parts of a circle, but there are several lesser-known theorems involving the arcs of a circle that might be helpful to have up your sleeve for a GMAT rainy day!

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How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the GMAT

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the GMAT

There is one recurring question everyone has about the GMAT: what can I expect on “Game Day” and how well will practice tests prepare me for the real deal?  This is a tough question; everyone trains and reacts differently.  However, there’s one thing you should know: The GMAT Will Surprise You.  It will surprise you because the test makers want to hit you with difficult and unexpected challenges; it’s the best way to prove you earned the score.

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Examples of Ratio Problems on the GMAT

Examples of Ratio Problems on the GMAT

When studying for the GMAT, some questions will undoubtedly bring back fond memories of high school math classes, cramming for exams and wondering if that classmate you had a crush on even knew you existed (note: this may also remind you of Dawson’s Creek). Algebra and Geometry concepts evoke these feelings of nostalgia, because unless you’re an engineer or an architect (perhaps Art Vandelay?), you probably haven’t thought about the concepts in a decade or two.

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How to Solve for Data Sufficiency Value Questions on the GMAT

How to Solve for Data Sufficiency Value Questions on the GMAT

We’ve looked at a lot of ways the GMAT can make Data Sufficiency questions more challenging (number properties, I’m talking to you!), but one type of DS question the GMAT likes to throw out there to really confuse unwary test-takers are value questions that ask about sums.

Say we had a question that asked, “what is the value of the sum of x and y?” Immediately, we have two possible ways that the statements could offer sufficiency: if they provided us with the ability to solve for x and y independently, and if they provided us with the ability to find the sum itself.

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How to Solve Data Sufficiency Questions on the GMAT

How to Solve Data Sufficiency Questions on the GMAT

On the GMAT quantitative section, you have just over 2 minutes on average to answer each question in front of you. Sometimes, those two minutes go by in a flash and you feel like the question should take at least 4 minutes in order to even make a reasonable guess. Other times, you think you can solve the question in a matter of seconds, and wonder why anyone would take a full 2 minutes on a question that you can eyeball without putting pen to paper (or marker to dry erase board). Because the 2 minute benchmark is an average, not a maximum, figuring out how much time to spend on each question is a crucial part of doing well on this test.

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How to Determine the Author's Tone on the GMAT

How to Determine the Author's Tone on the GMAT

When reading through Reading Comprehension texts, there are a few important concepts to keep in mind in order to be able to swiftly answer the upcoming questions. Every passage will have explicit information regarding the subject matter at hand, but some information will come from the author’s attitude and writing style. One of the most important things to do while reading a Reading Comprehension passage (other than staying awake) is determine the author’s tone.

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A Common Sense Approach to Work Rate Problems on the GMAT: Part II

A Common Sense Approach to Work Rate Problems on the GMAT: Part II

We introduced the most common sense way of approaching a simple work rate problem last week in Part I.  No setup was necessary.  There was zero possibility for a calculation error, or a misconception.

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How to Solve for Past Perfect Tense on the GMAT

How to Solve for Past Perfect Tense on the GMAT

The past perfect tense in a GMAT Sentence Correction question can subtly change the meaning of a sentence, making an answer choice incorrect, even if the verb agrees with its subject in number. The past perfect tense is often used to describe an action that was completed prior to another past action:

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How to Logically Solve Algebra Problems on the GMAT

How to Logically Solve Algebra Problems on the GMAT

Just as all roads lead to Rome (well, all roads in Europe anyways), there are many ways to solve math questions on the GMAT. Any question can conceivably be solved in a variety of ways, but they must always be logical. No method is inherently superior to any other, so often it’s a question of which method will solve this particular problem in the most efficient way possible.

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A Common Sense Approach to Work Rate Problems on the GMAT

A Common Sense Approach to Work Rate Problems on the GMAT

Combined work rate problems give many a headache at their mere mention.  After all, you have to think in terms of that fourth dimension, “time” (cue the Twilight Zone theme).  This alone puts it up there with Einsteinian Relativity in terms of difficulty.  There are always three moving parts – time, work, and speed – and sometimes three or more machines or people working together.

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How to Find Clues on the GMAT

How to Find Clues on the GMAT

Many GMAT students have likened themselves to Sherlock Holmes at one point or another while studying for this test. It is a natural comparison: you are a detective looking for clues in order to reach a conclusion that must be true. Unfortunately there’s no Dr. Watson to help guide your efforts, but you can inspire yourself from the super sleuth in your quest to solve the nefarious puzzles of Professor G. MoriArTy.

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3 Things the GMAT Testmakers Don't Want You to Know: Part III

3 Things the GMAT Testmakers Don't Want You to Know: Part III

Welcome to the third and final installment of GMAT’s secrets revealed!   We now know 2 things the GMAT testmakers don’t want you to know – one, they can do most quant problems entirely in their heads, and two, verbal complexity is intended to clarify, not confuse, a given situation.  These insights are a critical part of the recognition that the GMAT is not actually as difficult as it is intimidating.  It has a lot of tough-looking math and long, dense passages, but that’s mainly on the surface – deep down, unlocking GMAT reasoning is feasible for anyone.

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3 Things the GMAT Testmakers Don't Want You to Know: Part II

3 Things the GMAT Testmakers Don't Want You to Know: Part II

We began last week with a quant trick demonstrating the 1st Thing GMAT Testmakers Don’t Want You to Know: they can do quant problems entirely in their heads!  This was no doubt a carefully guarded secret, but now that it’s out there, it should take the intimidation factor of those difficult-looking quant problems down a notch or two.

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How to Approximate Square Roots on the GMAT

How to Approximate Square Roots on the GMAT

As a GMAT instructor, I frequently find myself perusing the GMAT Official Guide, dare I say, “for fun”. The OG is a terrific indication of the types of questions you can expect to see on the GMAT, and the solution is usually a great method to get to the right answer. However, sometimes I find myself surprised at the official answer because I would solve the question in a completely different way and get to the answer in significantly less time than the OG method.

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5 Tips on How to Study for the GMAT in 30 Days

5 Tips on How to Study for the GMAT in 30 Days

Studying for the GMAT in just one month is nobody’s idea of a party, but sometimes it can’t be avoided. If you’re locked in to your test date and need to make the best of a bad situation, wipe that perspiration off your brow and take a deep breath: it is possible to significantly improve your score in one month! In fact, depending on your latent test-taking, grammar, algebra, number properties, time management, and general cool-as-a-cucumber skills, you probably already have a LOT of the needed requirements found in a 700+ scoring GMAT test-taker. Here’s some quick tips to conquer content, strategy, and pacing in only 4 weeks.

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3 Things the GMAT Testmakers Don't Want You to Know

3 Things the GMAT Testmakers Don't Want You to Know

As I discussed in my last entry on The Art of War and success on the GMAT, the makers of the GMAT have only a few ways to attack you in battle.  They also have a few things that keep a figurative arm tied behind their back.  These limitations are what you can, and should, exploit to your advantage.  However, it may still not be clear who exactly you’re dealing with.  And as you remember, knowing thy enemy (and thyself) is key to a great score.

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Subject Verb Agreement on the GMAT

Subject Verb Agreement on the GMAT

Many concepts covered on the GMAT come up in every day conversation. One of the common mistakes frequently tested on the GMAT that people make mistakes with in colloquial speech is that lack of agreement between a subject and verb when the verb is placed before the subject (There’s a lot of reasons this happens…) People make this mistake regularly and no one really seems to notice it, but the GMAT thoroughly tests this type of mistake, so you likely will have had sufficient exposure to this scenario by test day.

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Avoid Common Mistakes in Data Sufficiency

Avoid Common Mistakes in Data Sufficiency

When answering data sufficiency questions on the GMAT, the key is to successfully determine when you have sufficient information to make a decision with 100% certainty. I often equate data sufficiency with determining whether the competition is stealing from you. If you’re sure they are not, then everything is fine and you are competing in a fair and balanced environment. Similarly, if you have definitive proof that they are hijacking your million dollar idea (possibly for pet rocks or the duck commander), then you can pursue legal action to remedy the situation.

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3 Tips to Score Higher on GMAT Test Day

3 Tips to Score Higher on GMAT Test Day

Each year, eager b-school hopefuls line up to take the GMAT, and each year many end up with a score below what they had been getting on their practice exams.  What went wrong? Why the discrepancy?  The answer is never easy to ascertain, but there are several questions you can ask yourself to try and figure out what happened.  One of the most important ones is actually rather simple:  did you practice for the test environment as well as for the questions themselves?

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Keep the GMAT Simple

Keep the GMAT Simple

There is a lot of value in keeping things simple. Simplicity is a beautiful thing, especially when combined with functionality. Think of the designs Apple comes up with (or at least did when Steve Jobs ran the show): products were simple, sleek, stylish, and routinely worked flawlessly.  The appeal and popularity of these machines is steeped in how effortlessly they perform their functions, combining reliable functionality and timeless elegance.

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Effective vs. Efficient on the GMAT

Effective vs. Efficient on the GMAT

Two words that often get confused in the English language are effective and efficient. Many people use these words as if they are synonyms, when, in fact, they are two distinct notions that only sound like homonyms. In fact, the words effective and efficient complement each other perfectly.  How does this affect the GMAT? While both words are usually used as compliments, their effect on the exam is very noticeable (see what I did there?)

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How the NBA Can Help You Track Time Efficiently on Test Day - Part II

How the NBA Can Help You Track Time Efficiently on Test Day - Part II

Last week, I introduced the idea of timing on the GMAT. Today, we will look at the technique which helped me a lot in reducing my stress and improving my time management. Have a look, take away the main methodology and please feel free to adjust certain parts of it to suit your own purposes.

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How to Write an AWA Essay Like Ernest Hemingway

How to Write an AWA Essay Like Ernest Hemingway

Hemingway wrote his prose in a manner which has come to be known as the “Iceberg Theory.” Influenced by his journalistic career, Hemingway believed that by omitting superfluous and extraneous matter, writing becomes more interesting. The minimalistic style of a Hemingway piece is a lesson all GMAT students can apply to their AWA writing: take out the fluff! Argument essays that receive scores of 6 typically are “fluff-free” zones – the paragraphs are organized and to the point, and they say what they mean to say.

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How to Adapt to the GMAT's Adaptability

How to Adapt to the GMAT's Adaptability

GMAT students can now benefit from a new blog series featuring video tips from Veritas Prep’s own Director of Academic Programs, Brian Galvin. Last week, Brian helped us spot pronoun errors in Sentence Correction by ‘minding the gap.’  This week, we’ll learn about the adaptability and scoring of the GMAT.

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5 Tips to Pump Up Your AWA Essay

5 Tips to Pump Up Your AWA Essay

Are you having a hard time writing a solid “6” AWA, or getting some disappointing feedback from instructors, tutors, or friends? The good thing about AWA, is that its easily improved. Going from an “average” 4 to a “perfect” 6 is achievable by just about anyone who can read, memorize, and practice.

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How the NBA Can Help You Track Time Efficiently on Test Day - Part I

How the NBA Can Help You Track Time Efficiently on Test Day - Part I

Today I would like to share from personal experience some advice on how to efficiently track your time and control your pace while not getting too stressed out about how well you are doing on the GMAT. Time management is crucial to success on your GMAT exam.

Let’s start with the analysis of the issue at hand:  timing on the GMAT test in general, and why tracking your time and controlling your pace is also important.

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How to Find the Right Answer in Critical Reasoning

How to Find the Right Answer in Critical Reasoning

In Critical Reasoning, it is often possible to foresee the correct answer without even glancing at the answer choices. Whenever a question asks you to strengthen or weaken an argument, the correct answer will usually be the one that fixes the inconsistency between the conclusion and the premise of the passage. Inference questions can be extremely open ended, but strengthen/weaken (can I abbreviate this to streaken?) questions are generally about the most glaring issue with a sentence. The GMAT uses this type of trick a lot, so the errors may be subtle and they may be crafty, but they are always present in any strengthen/weaken CR question.

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Spotting Pronoun Errors in GMAT Sentence Correction

Spotting Pronoun Errors in GMAT Sentence Correction

GMAT students can now benefit from a new series featuring video tips from Veritas Prep’s own Brian Galvin. Last week, Brian reminded us to ‘mind the gap’ in critical reasoning, and today he’ll give us a look into pronoun errors.

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Simple and Compound Interest on the GMAT

Simple and Compound Interest on the GMAT

Occasionally on the GMAT, word problems involving simple and compound interest pop up. Interest can be thought of as the rental cost of money. The math requires a solid grasp of percentages and exponents. Like Rates and Work questions, this concept can appear intimidating if you don’t know the required formulas, but are actually fairly simple to solve!

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Angles in Data Sufficiency

Angles in Data Sufficiency

The GMAT is an exam steeped in logic, deduction and understanding. In order to succeed on the exam, you should be able to look at any given question objectively and determine what it is asking, and where the traps may lie. Now, this is akin to asking you to navigate a labyrinth while avoiding the Minotaur: just because you know the rules, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you will be successful. Taking the labyrinth as a metaphor, how can you rise to the challenge put forth in front of you?

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An Introduction to Two-Part Analysis Questions in Integrated Reasoning

An Introduction to Two-Part Analysis Questions in Integrated Reasoning

Two-Part Analysis questions, or TPA, (one of four question-types in the IR section) present a short paragraph with information. Answer choices will be presented in several columns and rows. Each column stands for a component, and each row is part of the solution. You’ll need to choose one answer from each column.

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Mind the Gap in GMAT Critical Reasoning Questions

Mind the Gap in GMAT Critical Reasoning Questions

GMAT students can now benefit from a new series featuring video tips from Veritas Prep’s own Brian Galvin. Last week, Brian shared a tip for mastering Data Sufficiency.

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Sentence Correction: Process of Elimination on the GMAT

Sentence Correction: Process of Elimination on the GMAT

Summer blockbuster season is upon us, and one of the joys of the movies is to go see an ambitious motion picture on the big screen and get immersed in a world of make-believe for a few hours (this kind of sounds like taking the GMAT, doesn’t it?). If you’re going by yourself or with another person, you can usually agree on a movie pretty quickly and be on your way. However, if you’ve ever tried to go see a movie with like six friends, it often becomes a case of Process of Elimination.

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Identifying Assumptions on the GMAT

Identifying Assumptions on the GMAT

Do you find yourself with your head in your hands after yet another series of practice questions, looking at a less than 50% hit-rate on Assumption questions? You’re not alone! Most of us have no background with formal logic prior to the GMAT, and suddenly we’re expected to understand brand-new concepts like premise, conclusion, flaw, etc. intuitively. To start with, let’s review some basic definitions.

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How to Succeed on the GMAT

How to Succeed on the GMAT

Competition is as inherent in nature as life itself.  Darwinian natural selection is an exercise in pure competition among and within various species.  War is an extension of this brand of competition.  War, it happens, has also contributed to some of the most momentous developments throughout history.  Not only have civilizations risen and fallen, some of the most incredible progress and regress has come from battles for supremacy.  Many of our oldest surviving texts were written to preserve the memory of major wars, and many technologies have arisen from the desire for victory, in battle or in life.  This notion of competition has evolved and spread into more modern forms — business, sports, politics, and even academics.  A wise student will see a similar kind of competition manifested in the GMAT.

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How to Master Data Sufficiency

How to Master Data Sufficiency

Students prepping for the GMAT now have the opportunity to learn from video tips, in addition to the text articles from our blog. Brian Galvin is a main collaborator on all of the Veritas Prep materials, and in these videos he will share his tips and expertise so you can quickly learn how to master the GMAT.

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