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GMAT Tip of the Week: Prime Cut

GMAT Tip of the Week: Prime Cut

In case you missed it, today’s date is a rather fun one: 11/11/11. (It’s also a date that Europeans and Americans write the same way. No fretting over “Should the day or month come first?” here.) Next year we’ll have a 12/12/12, but then after that the “fun” dates will be few and far between. While we still have this fun date to enjoy — three prime numbers in a row! — let’s revisit a lesson from the past about how to quickly break down larger numbers and determine whether or not they’re prime.

Let’s look at 2011. Is it a prime number? You could spend at least a few minutes trying to answer this question if you’re not careful. But if you think strategically, it needn’t take that long, and you can likely complete your “prime test” even within the two-minutes-per-question time allotment that the GMAT would give you for a question that, as so many do, requires your knowledge of prime numbers and divisibility. Here’s how to get started:

GMAT Tip of the Week: What Kim Kardashian Can Teach You About Your GMAT Prep

GMAT Tip of the Week: What Kim Kardashian Can Teach You About Your GMAT Prep

It was the divorce that everyone — except perhaps Kris Humphries — saw coming on the day of the wedding. After a mere 72 days, Kim Kardashian and her New Jersey Net announced that they would end their brief experiment with the idea of matrimony. Whether you think it was a publicity stunt or a more heartfelt commitment that just didn’t work out, there’s something that you can take away from all of this.

Just as you should get married when you’re serious about the commitment (ahem, Kim and Kris), you should only adopt a GMAT prep strategy when you’re sure that it’s effective and it suits your learning style. It’s good to know what works for other people, but your learning style is unique to you, and your mileage may vary. So, choose a GMAT study strategy carefully and, once you’ve done that, commit to it with all of your heart.

GMAT Tip of the Week: Three Essential Problem Solving Strategies

GMAT Tip of the Week: Three Essential Problem Solving Strategies

Vanilla Ice is famous for many reasons, but perhaps most of all for his lyric “If there was a problem, yo, I’ll solve it…” (Check out the hook while his DJ revolves it).  You, too, can be ice cold under pressure and a master problem solver.  Consider these three essential problem solving strategies:

GMAT Tip of the Week: Say It Ain't So

GMAT Tip of the Week: Say It Ain't So

The only way to successfully complete “Weaken” critical reasoning questions on the GMAT is to find alternate explanations for the conclusion.

Do you see a flaw in that sentence?  You should – and you can, using the very conclusion proffered above.  Finding alternate explanations isn’t the “only way” to successfully complete those questions; you could guess correctly, you could eliminate answer choices that are out of scope of the conclusion, you could identify the flaw in the argument and find an answer choice that exploits that flaw…  But arguably the most effective way to solve these problems is to find an alternate explanation – like we just did in demonstrating alternative ways to solve these problems correctly.

GMAT Tip of the Week: Just Get Started

GMAT Tip of the Week: Just Get Started

It’s a time-honored tradition in  the Veritas Prep office: Every Friday, your author is responsible for a GMAT Tip of the Week post. And every Friday morning, he gets a cup of coffee, check his email, opens the “add new blog post” link for this blog, and sits for a few minutes staring at the blank screen.  And every Friday morning, another of this blog’s authors sits a row behind him, chuckling at the tradition and the visual of a blogger staring at an empty screen looking for inspiration.  He’s laughing right now, in fact.

This scene is also quite common on the GMAT, as examinees often read a question, get to the end of the prompt, take a second to think “wow, that’s a tough question,” and then…sit, stunned or perplexed or deep-in-thought, waiting for that stroke of inspiration to guide them.  And while another blog author sitting behind you isn’t laughing, somewhere a GMAT question author once laughed knowing that you’d approach the question this way, losing valuable time and breeding unwanted stress while you stare at the screen or at your noteboard.  This, too, is a time-honored tradition.

GMAT Tip of the Week: Eye of the Tiger

GMAT Tip of the Week: Eye of the Tiger

As difficult an evening as last night was for New York Yankee fans, it wasn’t a picnic for Detroit Tigers fans either. En route to a 3-2, series clinching victory, Detroit watched an early 2-0 and then 3-0 lead evaporate, turning into 3-1 and then 3-2 with the bases loaded in the heart of the Yankee batting order. No doubt, Yankee fans endured a sleepless night thinking of what-could-have-been, but Tiger fans endured a lifetime of stress in the bottom halves of the late innings, as each pitch had the potential to be the backbreaker.

Adding to the gut-wrenching agony of what-looks-like-victory-but-might-soon-be-defeat was the Yankee mystique, playing sports’ most storied franchise in its own stadium with reminders of Yankee greatness and the defeat of would-be challengers past looming throughout The House That Looks A Lot Like The House That Ruth Built. Even in victory, Tiger fans had to taste defeat over and over again. One could say it was a lot like taking the GMAT…

GMAT Tip of the Week: If At First You Don't Succeed...

GMAT Tip of the Week: If At First You Don't Succeed...

The GMAT is a fascinating exam for its ability to take fairly common concepts (algebra, arithmetic, logic) and turn them into devilishly-clever problems that stump high percentages of college-educated adults.  There are several familiar ways in which the GMAT does so:

- Forcing you to reverse-engineer a concept that you’ve always known from top-down

- Employing “complex” numbers or variables to disguise a problem that you’d ordinarily breeze through with smaller numbers

- Relying on your own mental inertia to distract you from the true matter at hand

- Creating problem setups that require your first 2-3 steps to feel “wrong”

GMAT Tip of the Week: Think Like the Testmaker

GMAT Tip of the Week: Think Like the Testmaker

In this week’s GMAT Tip, our instructor shows how thinking about the test as a whole can accelerate your understanding of its individual parts, and more importantly how that can help you study efficiently and effectively.

At Plymouth-Salem High School in the 1990s, a chemistry teacher by the name of Mr. Barnes was a divisive character.  He may not have been anyone’s absolute favorite teacher (read: he never brought in candy, showed movies, or held class outside, the three cornerstones of favorite-high-school-teacherdom) but he was most certainly some students’ least and a beloved figure for others.  He challenged students with rigorous standards and assertive discipline. 

GMAT Tip of the Week: Top Ten Ways to Know If the GMAT Didn't Go Well for You

GMAT Tip of the Week: Top Ten Ways to Know If the GMAT Didn't Go Well for You

Many of us who are about to take the GMAT (or have already survived it) have had bad dreams about test day. This is totally natural! If you’ve prepared for the GMAT properly, then you have nothing to worry about, and you should learn to embrace this anxiety and use it to your advantage.

One of the best ways to do that is to use humor to your advantage. If you can laugh at yourself and about your jitters, you’re more likely to stay relaxed and perform up to your potential on test day. With that in mind, today we offer the Top Ten Ways to Know If the GMAT Didn’t Go Well for you:

GMAT Tip of the Week: The Unburdening of Proof

GMAT Tip of the Week: The Unburdening of Proof

As you study for the GMAT, you’re likely to begin by noticing all of those things that you used to know.  Algebra rules, geometry formulas, calculation methods – at first glance the GMAT looks like a test of every math class you took before you turned 16.  And when you were learning those things as an adolescent, you typically learned 2-3 formulas at a time, studied and practiced them Thursday night, took the test on Friday, then started over again.  So your inclination when you see that the GMAT will require you to again use those rules/formulas/methods is likely to be that you should memorize them all again and drill some repetition.

GMAT Tip of the Week: Planning Your Study Schedule

GMAT Tip of the Week: Planning Your Study Schedule

Happy Labor Day weekend, readers!  In honor of Labor Day, we offer this study tip (or series of tips) for those of you about to get to work on your GMAT studies.  As you plot out your study plan, keep in mind that the GMAT is a test different from others you’ve taken.  Cramming will not work and repetition leading to rote memory isn’t all that effective either.  Remember, the GMAT is a test of how you think, so while you study pay attention to your thought process. 

We recommend:

GMAT Tip of the Week: The Counterproductivity of Goal-Setting

GMAT Tip of the Week: The Counterproductivity of Goal-Setting

It’s not uncommon for GMAT test-takers to be “goal-oriented”.  In fact, pre-MBAs are just even more likely to be goal-oriented than they are to use buzzwords like goal-oriented.  For most of your life, mentors and superiors have told you to set goals and work to achieve them, so why should the GMAT be any different?  But heed these words – for some of you reading this, a focus on your GMAT goal will be counterproductive, so you would be well-advised to consider, perhaps for the first time in your professional/academic life, a happy-go-luckier approach to achieving your goals.  Here’s why:

GMAT Tip of the Week: Start Practicing Integrated Reasoning Now

GMAT Tip of the Week: Start Practicing Integrated Reasoning Now

The GMAT’s new Integrated Reasoning section won’t become an official part of the test until next June, so anyone who plans on being done with the GMAT before then doesn’t need to prepare for it. However, even if you don’t expect that you’ll need to get good at answering Integrated Reasoning questions, this new question type embodies all of the skills that the GMAT tries to test — your ability to understand relationships between ideas, recognize what information you need to answer a question, and evaluate information that comes in a variety of forms.

While these might seem like esoteric skills at first glance, if you spend enough time with the GMAT (like we do!), you will eventually realize that these are the skills that matter most, not the ability to memorize content. That’s why we have already spent months learning more about the new Integrated Reasoning section of the test, and it’s why — no matter when you plan on taking the test — you should start to familiarize with these skills now.

GMAT Tip of the Week:  Three Essential Reading Comprehension Strategies

GMAT Tip of the Week: Three Essential Reading Comprehension Strategies

Based simply on the fact that you’re reading this, one can infer that you’re a decent reader.  So why are you struggling with Reading Comprehension questions on the GMAT?  GMAT Reading Comprehension is its own genre; remember, business schools are preparing you for management, so the type of reading they want to see is different from the kinds of reading one would undertake in medical or law school.  Accordingly, the GMAT needs to assess the way that you read as a manager, and so it features passages and questions that will allow it to do so.  Learning to read in a GMAT context will greatly improve your performance and efficiency. 

These three strategies will be instrumental in that process:

GMAT Tip of the Week: Algebraic Repackaging (or, “How I Got Paid To Write About Last Night's Episode Of Jersey Shore”)

GMAT Tip of the Week: Algebraic Repackaging (or, “How I Got Paid To Write About Last Night's Episode Of Jersey Shore”)

If you’re in the demographic group “young professionals between 21 and 35″ – and our market research suggests that you are – you’ve likely spent time today around the water cooler or coffee machine at work talking about last night’s season-premiere of Jersey Shore.  Maybe you were entertained by JWoww’s admission that she packed nine cans of bronzer for her trip, or by Snooki’s new workout routine.  Maybe you’ve watched the season preview trailer and can’t wait for Ronnie to deck the Situation, or you’re a hopeless romantic and want Ronnie and Sam to patch things up so that you can watch those two fight all over again.  Maybe, like your humble author, you can’t even find words to describe the entity that is Deena.

GMAT Video of the Week: Working with Ratios in Data Sufficiency Problems

GMAT Video of the Week: Working with Ratios in Data Sufficiency Problems

Continuing our GMAT prep video series, today we break down a common type of ratio problem that you will often see in Data Sufficiency problems. As Brian says, many people are not comfortable working with ratios. Add in unknown variables, and intuition often goes out the window. But, if you look closely, often the problem does indeed give you enough information to solve the problem.

Fortunately, being grounded in basic Data Sufficiency strategy can help. Remember that there will be many instances in which you’ll be tempted to select answer choice E (insufficient information), but upon further inspection, you may realize that you do in fact have what you need. Watch the video to learn more:

GMAT Tip of the Week: 3 Essential Data Sufficiency Strategies

GMAT Tip of the Week: 3 Essential Data Sufficiency Strategies

Perhaps no GMAT item is as emblematic of the test as is a Data Sufficiency question.  It’s an iconic question format, unique to the GMAT and true to the aims of this specific test: to reward those who show the higher-order reasoning skills that will lead to success in business.

True to their name, Data Sufficiency questions ask you to determine when you will have enough information (when is the data sufficient) to make a conclusive decision.  In doing so, these questions can assess your ability to plan ahead for a task; to elicit an effective return-on-investment (remember, you can’t use both statements if one of them is, alone, sufficient), to find flaws with conventional wisdom, and to think flexibly. 

GMAT Tip of the Week: Using the Borders

GMAT Tip of the Week: Using the Borders

Have you learned to love Data Sufficiency yet?  If you haven’t, you may have complained at least once or twice that Data Sufficiency can be a lot like a high-stakes game of Simon Says:

What is the value of x?

(1) x^2 = 16

(2) 6 < 2x < 10

GMAT Video of the Week: Critical Reasoning and Statistics

GMAT Video of the Week: Critical Reasoning and Statistics

Continuing our new GMAT prep video series, today we look at how statistics can easily mislead you in Critical Reasoning problems. As Brian says, people tend to make bad decisions when dealing with statistics. It is far too easy — either deliberately or not — to mislead others (or yourself) with statistics-based arguments. Any time statistics enter the picture, you want to be especially critical when evaluating an argument.

Today’s video analyzes a debate between two people, and tests whether or not you can find the identify the link in logic that would most weaken the argument presented. Pay attention to the arguments and any gaps that might be hiding in the logic!

GMAT Tip of the Week: Good, Better, Best. When Can You Let Your GMAT Score Rest?

GMAT Tip of the Week: Good, Better, Best. When Can You Let Your GMAT Score Rest?

GMAT scores are frustrating entities.  If you’re like most students, you work hard to maximize your score, and once you have a score you feel is competitive you inevitably start to wonder whether it’s really “good enough.”  Many a student has said something to the extent of “my dream goal is 700+ but I’d be happy with anything over 650″, then scored 680 and called her tutor to say “I’m so excited – I scored 680!  Thankyouthankyouthankyou!!!!  But I’m thinking of retaking it…”

On the other end of the spectrum, many a candidate has looked at the middle 80% range at his elite target school, seen that his 640 forms  that lower border, and said “great – I’m in the range…no need to worry about the GMAT again!”

And then there’s that guy that everyone hates – the guy who scores 730 and goes on every GMAT forum and attends every free GMAT seminar declaring his intentions to the newbies in the room:  “I have a 730 but it’s imperative to me to know which strategies will help me get to 770.”

GMAT Tip of the Week: Three Essential Critical Reasoning Strategies

GMAT Tip of the Week: Three Essential Critical Reasoning Strategies

There may not be a more aptly named question type on the GMAT than “Critical Reasoning,” a question type that rewards critical thinking in a major way.  Students are successful by reading critically and economically, quickly noting flaws in logic and embracing their role within each question.  Those who buy into the critical way of processing arguments can “click” with critical reasoning quite readily, quickly organizing information into actionable components and anticipating correct answers before even reading them. 

Accordingly, we offer these three critical strategies for critical reasoning questions:

GMAT Video of the Week: Sentence Correction Decision Points

GMAT Video of the Week: Sentence Correction Decision Points

Continuing our new GMAT prep video series, today we take a look at some common traps that the GMAT sets in Sentence Correction problems. As Brian states at the start of the video, simple content knowledge is virtually everywhere these days. What separates great managers from good ones is not the ability to call up facts, but rather the ability to interpret information and make good decisions.

Today’s video takes a look at a Sentence Correction problem that preys on many test takers’ dogmatic search for idioms, leading many of them to make the wrong choice. This is a good example of the type of logic that can keep you from earning those last critical 50 points on the GMAT!

GMAT Tip of the Week: Three Essential Sentence Correction Strategies

GMAT Tip of the Week: Three Essential Sentence Correction Strategies

Of all the question types on the GMAT, a global exam for which the pool of test takers includes more than half of its examinees from outside the United States, Sentence Correction may seem the most arbitrary to prospective examinees.  Math we get: nearly all MBA graduates will have to make decisions using numbers and nearly all MBA programs require coursework in areas like finance and accounting for which some baseline math skills are important.  Similarly, reading comprehension is something that any school would want to ensure its students can do effectively, and the logic behind critical reasoning makes a lot of sense, too: schools and employers want people who can think logically and make reasoned decisions.

But English grammar?  Why would schools like INSEAD and ESADE, located in countries where English is not an official language and attracting students from all corners of the globe, be concerned with English grammar subtleties?  Especially when, as about 1/3 of the verbal section, sentence correction counts for about 17% of someone’s GMAT score.  It’s probably nice to know that everyone can speak the same language, but 17% of someone’s entry value?  Isn’t that overkill?

GMAT Tip of the Week: Word to the Wise

GMAT Tip of the Week: Word to the Wise

Admit it: You had at least a class or two in high school for which you thrived on partial credit – you wouldn’t get many answers right, but with participation points, “show your work” points, and partial credit for doing most of the steps correctly you could comfortably claim your B and get on with the more-important work of finding a date for the homecoming dance.  So on a test like the GMAT, which is all-or-nothing with no potential for partial credit, the prospect of having to be 100% correct on any given problem is a little daunting.

Where the GMAT can make this even more difficult is by subtle wordplay that allows for you to do all the work correctly on a problem, but by missing or tweaking your read of just one word in the question coming up with a completely different incorrect answer.  As such, attention to detail on the GMAT is crucial – you need to learn to spot those ever-critical words that, on a dime, can change the answer from B to D.

GMAT Video of the Week: Working with Shapes within Shapes

GMAT Video of the Week: Working with Shapes within Shapes

The Veritas Prep blog just added another weapon to its GMAT arsenal! This summer Veritas Prep will roll out a new series of video tips on this blog and on YouTube. We plan to explore all aspects of GMAT prep in the same witty, easy-to-understand way that we normally do on our blog. These video tips will provide a great way for you to get a quick explanation on something or to brush up on a key skill needed for GMAT success.

Our first video tip is actually a two-for-one affair: Brian Galvin, Veritas Prep’s Director of Academic Programs, shows you key relationships to remember when working with squares inscribed inside circles, and when tackling circles inscribed inside squares.

GMAT Tip of the Week: Tri Your Best

GMAT Tip of the Week: Tri Your Best

They say that good things come in threes, so if you’re reading this GMAT tip blog post you’re in luck!  The GMAT is an act in three parts – an academic triathlon, if you will, and one that like a triathlon will test your abilities as well as your stamina.  In many ways, the GMAT is analogous to an endurance-length triathlon, and at Veritas Prep we’re fortunate to have experts on both.  As you attempt to be the Macca of the GMAT or do as well as Chrissie Wellington, here are some ways that the GMAT is much like an Ironman triathlon, and how you can use that knowledge to succeed.  Breaking from our typical third-person journalistic voice, we offer the first-person voice of Director of Academic Programs / Ironman Brian Galvin:

GMAT Tip of the Week: Reframing Your Mind For Your GMAT Retake

GMAT Tip of the Week: Reframing Your Mind For Your GMAT Retake

It’s not uncommon for MBA candidates to take the GMAT more than once.  It’s a difficult test, after all, and often students find that some of the “intangible” factors like pacing, test-day anxiety, etc. can detract from what felt like would be an optimal test-day experience.  Other times, students underestimate the difficulty of the exam and fail to prepare as thoroughly as they likely should have; or they may simply have had great intentions of preparation but seen those plans evaporate as life got in the way, but they still choose to take the test just to see how it goes.

In any case, retaking the GMAT isn’t ideal – it does cost money and take time, after all – but it’s not a major cause for alarm. Schools do not look unfavorably on retakes; your 730 score is just as valid if it comes on your third attempt as it would be if it were your first time.  So if you do need to retake the GMAT, know that you’re not alone and that you won’t be penalized.

GMAT Tip of the Week: 5 Things You Can Do Now To Succeed on the GMAT Later

GMAT Tip of the Week: 5 Things You Can Do Now To Succeed on the GMAT Later

As of press time for this article, most of the United States will be heading out early from work to partake in the unofficial beginning of summer, Memorial Day Weekend.  As you read this on your smartphone in traffic on the LIE to the Hamptons or up I-75 to “Up North” Michigan, the entire summer is ahead of you.  But if you’re planning to apply to business school this fall, you should heed the warning that you learned in your earlier scholastic days – time flies when you’re having fun, and the fall, like those objects in your rearview mirror, is probably closer than it appears.

Rest assured that you can still enjoy most of your summer even if you don’t plan on taking the GMAT until later in the fall.  But even without dedicating much of the summer to studying, there are at least five habits you can add to your day-to-day lifestyle that will get you ready to hit the ground running when you do begin your GMAT preparation in earnest sometime soon:

GMAT Tip of the Week AND GMAT Challenge Question: Two-for-Twentieth!

GMAT Tip of the Week AND GMAT Challenge Question: Two-for-Twentieth!

Hello again readers, and happy May Twentieth!  In honor of that 2 in 5/20 (the day before The End of the World, of course), today’s post is dual-purposed in two ways:  We have a GMAT challenge question and a GMAT tip of the week, and the GMAT tip of the week is actually two in one.  First, take a look at this challenge Critical Reasoning question:

A recent Bloomberg Businessweek article cited that the average GMAT score for 20 and 21-year olds is 575, while for 22 and 23 year olds it is only 539.  Therefore, all potential business school applicants should be advised to take the GMAT while they’re younger so that they can expect a higher score.

GMAT Tip of the Week: Why Michael Bolton Would Fail the GMAT

GMAT Tip of the Week: Why Michael Bolton Would Fail the GMAT

The Jester of Tortuga

When you receive your MBA and go off into your own office space in the workforce, chances are you’d rather be Bill Lumbergh, boss man, than Michael Bolton — either the object of corporate downsizing or the singer-songwriter.  As such, it is imperative on the GMAT to not be Michael Bolton!  Consider this evidence, courtesy of Saturday Night Live’s most recent digital short:
GMAT Tip of the Week: Three Simple Rules to Writing a Well-Organized AWA Essay

GMAT Tip of the Week: Three Simple Rules to Writing a Well-Organized AWA Essay

As students approach their GMAT test dates, it becomes more and more important to them to be able to handle the AWA essays at the beginning of the test both efficiently and capably, earning a score of 5 or 6 without much effort.  This can actually be fairly easy to do, most notably through the emphasis of each author on an essay that is well-organized and easy for the reader to process.  Therefore, anyone looking to perform well on the AWA section should read the following paragraphs for steps that they can use to write a well-organized, high-scoring essay.

GMAT Tip of the Week: The Most Logical Way To Study Sentence Correction

GMAT Tip of the Week: The Most Logical Way To Study Sentence Correction

As someone reading this GMAT study blog, I hope that you’re cringing as you read this very sentence. Why? Because that sentence contained a classic GMAT sentence correction error — the modifier to begin the sentence “As someone reading this blog” should apply to you, the reader, and not to me, the author (as you may have noticed if you read regularly, I never re-read anything I’ve written. One take, like Jay-Z. My editors hate that.) (Yes, we do! — Ed.)

You know that the GMAT tests Modifiers in Sentence Correction. But the unasked question that you may want to ask is: Why? Why Modifiers and not the fact that you’re not supposed to end a sentence with a preposition? Why Modifiers and not something more obscure like “when assigning a possessive to someone whose name ends in ‘s,’ what is the rule for when you just put the apostrophe right after the ‘s’ (Russ’) and when you put another ‘s’ after the apostrophe (Russ’s)?”

GMAT Tip of the Week: Easter Egg Hunt... On the GMAT?

GMAT Tip of the Week: Easter Egg Hunt... On the GMAT?

Spring is here and Sunday is the Easter Holiday. In North America that means the tradition of the “Easter Egg Hunt.” Throughout the United States, adults will be hiding plastic eggs filled with candy, toys, and even money. Children will then race around trying to find the eggs hidden in the flower beds, in bushes, inside the mailbox — just about anywhere!

“Easter Egg” has another meaning as well, one that applies to the Analysis of an Argument task on the GMAT. This meaning of “Easter Egg” is from the computer programming world. An Easter Egg is something that a programmer intentionally hides in a program for others to find. This is where the Analysis of an Argument comes in; Easter Eggs are intentional flaws hidden in the Analysis of an Argument prompt for you to find.

GMAT Tip of the Week: 5 Ways to Minimize Test-Day Anxiety

GMAT Tip of the Week: 5 Ways to Minimize Test-Day Anxiety

Perhaps the most annoying thing about the GMAT is that it tends to punish those who care the most about it.  As you’ve studied, you’ve undoubtedly come to realize that often the easiest way to miss a question is to be rushed, distracted, or just stressed out — when you’re not completely focused, you’re prone to calculation errors, assumptions, misreads, and other “silly” mistakes that you know you shouldn’t make but you just can’t shake.  And as though you’re stuck in quicksand, the harder you struggle the deeper you sink.  Test-day anxiety is one of the leading causes of later-that-day depression, which is a leading cause of retaking-the-test-day-anxiety, and the vicious cycle repeats.  How can you fix that?

Here are five tips that can dramatically reduce your test-day anxiety:

GMAT 4-1-1: The 700 Idioms You Absolutely Must Memorize To Score 700

GMAT 4-1-1: The 700 Idioms You Absolutely Must Memorize To Score 700

Welcome back to this week’s installment of GMAT 4-1-1, in which we’ll cover a list of the 700 idioms that you simply must memorize if you want to score 700 or better on the GMAT exam. As English is universally considered as the most important language in all of the business world – after all, that’s all we know here in the U.S.! – it is crucial for anyone interested in even trace levels of business success to have fully mastered the idiomatic subtleties of the nuanced English language. Particularly for those going into marketing, regional and demographic segmentation dictates that one must be up to speed, also, on regional dialects and colloquialisms.

GMAT Tip of the Week: Check Yo Self

GMAT Tip of the Week: Check Yo Self

Welcome back to Hip Hop Month in the GMAT tip space, where we’re consistently amazed at how often rappers take Veritas Prep’s advice and Think Like the Testmaker.  You’ve seen it from Weezy as he took on the persona of the number 0; from House of Pain as they adopted the mindset of the entire test itself; from Eminem as a geometry question…  Young emcees, including Young MC, seem to become one with the GMAT.  After all, when you really break it down the GMAT ain’t nothing but a G thang…

GMAT Tip of the Week: Fighting the GMAT Like the Irish

GMAT Tip of the Week: Fighting the GMAT Like the Irish

When St. Patrick’s Day and Hip Hop Month coincide (well, almost…we hope you enjoyed your Paddy’s Day yesterday), it’s only natural to compare the GMAT testing center to a House of Pain, although it’s probably more appropriate to consider it a house of mental anguish.

The Irish rap group House of Pain is best known – or to most, only known – for its track “Jump Around”, one of the more lasting one-hit wonders of all time. Featured in movies, Strongbow ads, and before 4th quarters at Wisconsin’s Camp-Randall Stadium, “Jump Around” has become as friendly and pop-oriented as a Miley Cyrus ringtone – not bad for a song about a drunken Irish brawl. And it’s in that ability to be seen in multiple ways that “Jump Around”, even with a title that provides terrible advice for the GMAT as you cannot jump from question to question, can provide you with valuable insight as you study for the GMAT.

Bonus GMAT Tip of the Week: Regulate the GMAT Like Nate Dogg

Bonus GMAT Tip of the Week: Regulate the GMAT Like Nate Dogg

It’s a sad week here in (or, well, just up the coast from) the LBC. One of the true legends of West Coast hip hop, Nate Dogg, passed away this week. Amidst the comebacks of his contemporaries — Dr. Dre with his new album, Snoop Dogg segueing back to rap after his flirtation with poppy Katy Perrydom – Nate struggled with complications from a late 2007 stroke and never recovered to join them.

The legacy he leaves behind is impressive; sports columnist Bill Simmons once called Nate Dogg the “Robert Horry of rap” (or, rather, the other way around), noting that it was difficult to ever pinpoint what made either star so great, but regardless whenever either was involved the project was a runaway success. Nate’s smooth, baritone vocals on hits by Snoop Dogg, Dr. Dre, Warren G, Ludacris, Eminem, and others, formed the bass line for an era of music. And in that G Funk Era, regardless of the topic – gratuitous violence, gratuitous sex, gratuitous drug use – Nate’s style was unflappable. Perhaps that’s his greatest legacy – his flow was incredibly consistent and smooth. And it’s that classic Nate Dogg style that can teach you a thing or two about how to beat the GMAT.

GMAT Tip of the Week: Six Foot, Seven Foot, 600-to-700

GMAT Tip of the Week: Six Foot, Seven Foot, 600-to-700

As Hip-Hop Month rolls along in the Veritas Prep GMAT Tip of the Week space, we’re once again struck by how Lil Wayne has seemingly adopted the full persona of the GMAT for many of his recent tracks. As we noted earlier this year, his hit Right Above It includes several hints almost directly quoted from a GMAT test-writer, and if you listen closely Weezy is doing more of the same in his current radio single 6 Foot 7 Foot. As always, Weezy rhymes with the kind of insider knowledge of the GMAT that few outside of GMAC headquarters can even hope to have; could the title of his album “I Am Not a Human Being” really mean that the GMAT’s CAT is talking to us directly?

GMAT Tip of the Week: Guess Who's Back

GMAT Tip of the Week: Guess Who's Back

Greetings, readers, and welcome back to a second round of Hip Hop Month in the Veritas Prep Blog’s Tip of the Week space.  Yes, 11 months have passed since we ended March 2010, and although we’ve included the occasional Lil Wayne or Eminem reference over that time it’s been a while since we made the indisputable link between hip hop and the GMAT a priority.  As Jay-Z or Snoop Dogg might say, guess who’s back!

Calling back old hip hop classics is the name of the game on many radio stations and in many clubs these days, particularly when DJs show off their skills with mixes and mash-ups.  Here in Los Angeles, we anxiously await Power 106′s “Twelve Days of Mix-mas” in December and listen to the Mickey Fickey Mix all year long.  But here’s the problem with the radio hip hop mix (apologies to E-Man, Eric D-Lux, and the gang), and it’s a problem that can plague you on the GMAT as well: mixes inevitably cut off songs before they get to the ever-important crescendo.