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2 Simple GMAT Quant Questions That Will Help You Score Higher

2 Simple GMAT Quant Questions That Will Help You Score Higher

Let’s discuss races today. It is a very simple concept but questions on it tend to be tricky. But if you understand how to handle them, most questions can be done easily.

A few points to remember in races:

1. Make a diagram. Draw a straight line to show the track and assume all racers are at start at 12:00. Then according to headstart, place the participants.

Should You Double Check Your Answer Choices on the GMAT?

Should You Double Check Your Answer Choices on the GMAT?

A common mantra heard when studying for the GMAT is that you have to be fast when answering questions. This is absolutely true, as the exam is testing not only your reasoning skills but also your time management skills. This does not, however, necessarily mean that you must solve every question quickly. Indeed, there may be times where you feel fairly confident in the answer choice you’ve selected, but you don’t feel 100% certain (maybe a strong 60%). In these situations, it’s perfectly acceptable to double check your answer manually.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
How to Go from a 48 to 51 in GMAT Quant - Part IV

How to Go from a 48 to 51 in GMAT Quant - Part IV

To take a look at the previous posts of this thread, check: Part I, Part II and Part III.

GMAT Tip of the Week: The 2 Most Important Lessons You Will Learn from Mrs. Doubtfire

GMAT Tip of the Week: The 2 Most Important Lessons You Will Learn from Mrs. Doubtfire

For those considering higher education this week, Robin Williams’ memory looms large. The lessons he taught in Dead Poets’ Society and Good Will Hunting have made their way around the internet more quickly and in more contexts than even Williams’ genie character from Aladdin could throw out references.

Advanced Number Properties on the GMAT - Part IV

Advanced Number Properties on the GMAT - Part IV

As pointed out by a reader, we need to complete the discussion on a question discussed in our previous ‘Advanced Number Properties’ posts so let’s do that today. Note that the discussion that follows doesn’t fall in the purview of GMAT and you needn’t know it. You will be able to solve any question without taking this post into account but that has never stopped us from letting loose our curiosity so here goes…

How to Do Math on the GMAT Without Actually Doing Math

How to Do Math on the GMAT Without Actually Doing Math

On the GMAT quantitative section, the exam is testing your logic and analytical skills using mathematics as a medium. The topics used include geometry, algebra and arithmetic, all concepts that have been covered in high school curriculums around the world. However, the emphasis is really on the logic more than the math. In short, the question is simply asking you to solve a given problem by any means at your disposal. As such, many questions can be solved without doing any math whatsoever.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
How to Go From a 48 to 51 in GMAT Quant - Part III

How to Go From a 48 to 51 in GMAT Quant - Part III

Let’s get back to strategies that will help us reach the coveted 51 in Quant. First, take a look at Part I and Part II of this blog series. Since the Quant section is not a Math test, you need conceptual understanding and then some ingenuity for the hard questions (since they look unique). Today we look at a Quant problem which is very easy if the method “strikes”. Else, it can be a little daunting. What we will do is look at a “brute force” method for times when the textbook method is not easily identifiable.

Find Out How Algebra Could Be Your Key to Success on the GMAT Quant Section

Find Out How Algebra Could Be Your Key to Success on the GMAT Quant Section

If you want to bring your “A Game” on the Quant section you need to be very comfortable with Algebra.

There is one mathematical discipline that dominates the Quant section of the GMAT: Algebra. The majority of the math questions that you will see on test day involve algebra.

Many questions involve pure algebra, such as expressions and equations involving variables, roots, and exponents. Another large group of questions is word problems, most of which are best addressed using algebraic equations. Geometry is another significant subject on the GMAT; and geometry is simply a delivery mechanism for algebra. Even things like ratios can often best be addressed by using equations with “x” as the multiplier.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
Distract Yourself During Your GMAT Studies with This Question

Distract Yourself During Your GMAT Studies with This Question

In life, it’s important to have a hobby or pastime that you find interesting. Sometimes, when the daily grind of work, school, family, social responsibilities, (updating Facebook) and preparing for the GMAT just seems like too much to handle, it’s good to take a step back. Diving into a hobby helps take your mind off things by pausing everything else and concentrating on something personal and somewhat intimate to you. One of my favorite diversions is watching movies and immersing myself in the fictional world created on screen. Surprisingly, this same distraction can be applicable to GMAT studying as well.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
How to Go From a 48 to 51 in GMAT Quant - Part II

How to Go From a 48 to 51 in GMAT Quant - Part II

This post is continuation of last week’s post which you can check here.

Another method of saving time on simple questions – use data given in one statement to examine the other!

How to Go From a 48 to 51 in GMAT Quant - Part I

How to Go From a 48 to 51 in GMAT Quant - Part I

People often ask – how do we go from 48 to 51 in Quant? This question is very hard to answer since we don’t have a step by step plan – do theory from here – do questions from there – take a test from here – read posts from there etc. Today and in the next few weeks, we will discuss how to go from 48 to 51 in Quant.

GMAT Tip of the Week: LeBron James Says Don't Be Cavalier About Your Initial Data Sufficiency Decision

GMAT Tip of the Week: LeBron James Says Don't Be Cavalier About Your Initial Data Sufficiency Decision

It’s all anyone can talk about today – LeBron James has decided to reverse “The Decision” and return home to play for Cleveland. In doing so he forced many people to change their minds.

Let’s take a look at some of those people:

-LeBron himself, who once decided to leave and now comes home as the prodigal son
-Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert, who once wrote a scathing letter about James the week he left the Cavs for South Beach
-Cavaliers fans, who once burned LeBron’s jersey and rallied against him
-Dwayne Wade, who just last week opted out of a $40 million contract to restructure his deal to create space to attract more players to his and LeBron’s Heat team

Find the Correct Answer for Diagonals of a Polygon in This GMAT Question

Find the Correct Answer for Diagonals of a Polygon in This GMAT Question

In today’s post, we will give you a question with two solutions and two different answers. You have to find out the correct answer and explain why the other is wrong. But before we do that, let’s give you some background.

Given an n sided polygon, how many diagonals will it have?

An n sided polygon has n vertices. If you join every distinct pair of vertices you will get nC2 lines. These nC2 lines account for the n sides of the polygon as well as for the diagonals.

Determining How Much Time to Spend on GMAT Quant Questions

Determining How Much Time to Spend on GMAT Quant Questions

On the GMAT, you will be asked to answer multiple questions in a relatively short period of time. One of the main difficulties test takers have with the GMAT is that they run out of time before finishing all the questions. For the quant section, there are 37 questions to solve in 75 minutes, which gives an average of just over two minutes per question. Since you don’t want to finish at the 74:59 mark (unless you’re MacGyver), you can figure two minutes per question as a good target. The good news is that most questions can easily be solved within a two minute timeframe. Unfortunately, many test takers spend three or four minutes on questions because they do not understand what they are trying to solve.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
The Reason Behind Absolute Value Questions on the GMAT

The Reason Behind Absolute Value Questions on the GMAT

Even after working extensively on absolute value questions, sometimes students come up with “why?” i.e. why do we have to take positive and negative values? Why do we have to consider ranges etc. They know the process but they do not understand the reason they need to follow the process. So here today, in this post, we will try to explain the reason.

Easy (A)/(B) Trap in Data Sufficiency Questions on the GMAT

Easy (A)/(B) Trap in Data Sufficiency Questions on the GMAT

We know that ‘Easy C’ is a common trap of DS questions – have you wondered whether there could be trap called ‘Easy A/B’ such that the answer would actually be (C)? Such questions also exist! The point is that whenever you feel that the question was way too simple, you might want to take a step back and review. GMAT will try every trick in the trade to delineate you. Let us show you a question which looks like an easy (A) but isn’t:

Avoiding Traps in GMAT Quant Questions

Avoiding Traps in GMAT Quant Questions

A common mantra at Veritas Prep is that the GMAT is a test of how you think, not of what you know. This shouldn’t be interpreted to mean that you can go into the exam without knowing anything and expect to get a good score. Rather, it means that how you apply concepts is crucial in this exam. You need to have a strong base, like the foundation of a house, but the difficulty is in using the information you have to solve the problem in front of you.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
How Would You Solve This Data Sufficiency GMAT Question?

How Would You Solve This Data Sufficiency GMAT Question?

The question format least familiar to most prospective GMAT students is unquestionably Data Sufficiency. As a test exclusive (it has a no trade clause) question type, it is unlikely that you have come across such a question without having at least glanced at a GMAT prep book. However the format is completely logical. The question is asking when do you have sufficient data to answer a question, be it “always yes”, “always no” or “specific value x”. The enemy is uncertainty; any definitive answer will suffice to answer the question and move on to the next hurdle.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
Rounding Up Some Official GMAT Questions!

Rounding Up Some Official GMAT Questions!

Last week we looked at some rounding rules. Today, let’s go over some official questions on rounding. They are quite simple and if we just keep the “Slip to the side and look for a 5” rule in mind, they can be easily solved.

GMAT Tip of the Week: 99 Problems But Probability Ain't One

GMAT Tip of the Week: 99 Problems But Probability Ain't One

Some of the GMAT’s hardest Problem Solving problems can be made exponentially easier by keeping a famous Jay-Z lyric in the back of your mind. When you hear the phrase:

If you’re having girl problems, I feel bad for you son?

What immediately springs to mind?

I got 99 problems but a b**** ain’t one.

How to Solve Simple Math Equations on the GMAT

How to Solve Simple Math Equations on the GMAT

Many students who take the GMAT come from backgrounds that stressed mathematics. A significant percentage of GMAT test takers come from engineering backgrounds or other fields that require strong analytical skills. However, these students often find that the GMAT quantitative section is challenging for them. This is because the GMAT tests math in a way that is unfamiliar to these students, taking them out of their comfort zones and requiring them to solve questions in new and unfamiliar ways (most glaringly, without a calculator).

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
Rounding Rules on the GMAT: Slip to the Side and Look for a Five!

Rounding Rules on the GMAT: Slip to the Side and Look for a Five!

The famous rounding song by Joe Crone is pretty much all you need to solve the trickiest of rounding questions on GMAT:

You just slip to the side, and you look for a five.

Well if the number that you see is a five or more, 

You gotta round up now, that’s for sure.

Why You Should Do the Math on Data Sufficiency GMAT Questions

Why You Should Do the Math on Data Sufficiency GMAT Questions

On GMAT Data Sufficiency questions, it’s important to note that you don’t have to do any calculations to get the right answer. In theory, it’s entirely possible to simply look at a problem and determine that the answer must be D (whilst eating your grey poupon). The question format simply asks you to confirm whether you have enough information to make a decision, not what that decision is or what any specific value is.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
When Permutations & Combinations and Data Sufficiency Come Together on the GMAT!

When Permutations & Combinations and Data Sufficiency Come Together on the GMAT!

While discussing Permutations and Combinations many months back, we worked through several examples of arranging people in seats. Today we bring you an interesting question based on those concepts. It brings to the fore the tricky nature of both Data Sufficiency and Combinatorics – so much so that when the two get together, it is unlimited fun!

GMAT Tip of the Week: The Most Important Word on the GMAT

GMAT Tip of the Week: The Most Important Word on the GMAT

Over the course of your GMAT exam, you’ll read thousands of words. Each Reading Comp passage, for example, will have ~300 of them; each Sentence Correction prompt will have ~40. And while you won’t spend much time reading the words in the Data Sufficiency answer choices, having long since internalized what each letter means, you’ll spend plenty of time poring over keywords in the question stem. You’ll need to process tons of words as you take the GMAT, but on most questions one word will make all the difference:

Medians, Altitudes and Angle Bisectors in Special Triangles on the GMAT

Medians, Altitudes and Angle Bisectors in Special Triangles on the GMAT

We are assuming you know the terms median, angle bisector and altitude but still, just to be sure, we will start our discussion today by defining them:

Median – A line segment joining a vertex of a triangle with the mid-point of the opposite side.

Angle Bisector – A line segment joining a vertex of a triangle with the opposite side such that the angle at the vertex is split into two equal parts.

GMAT Tip of the Week: Maximizing Your Efficiency on Min-Max Problems

GMAT Tip of the Week: Maximizing Your Efficiency on Min-Max Problems

On nearly every GMAT, you’ll see at least one of the “Min/Max” variety of word problems, a category that’s difficult for even the brightest quant minds largely for one major reason: these aren’t your typical word problems, and they don’t lend themselves very well to algebra. They tend to be every bit as “situational” as “mathematical” and in fact are labeled “scenario-driven Min/Max problems” in the Veritas Prep Word Problems lesson. Why? Because they’re almost entirely driven by the situation, including:

A Remainders Shortcut for the GMAT

A Remainders Shortcut for the GMAT

We firmly believe that teaching someone is a most productive learning for oneself and every now and then, something happens that strengthens this belief of ours. It’s the questions people ask – knowingly or unknowingly – that connect strings in our mind such that we feel we have gained more from the discussion than even our students!

How to Quickly Solve Standard Deviation Questions on the GMAT

How to Quickly Solve Standard Deviation Questions on the GMAT

The quantitative section of the GMAT is designed to test your understanding and application of concepts you learned in high school. The exam focuses on core mathematical concepts such as algebra, geometry and statistics. However some concepts are more engrained in the high school curriculum than others. Everyone’s done addition, multiplication, subtraction and division, but sometimes figuring out factorials or square roots may be a little more unusual.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
A Take on GMAT Takeaways

A Take on GMAT Takeaways

Once you have covered your fundamentals, we suggest you to practice advanced questions and jot down your takeaways from them. Sometimes students wonder how to find that all important “takeaway”. Today, let’s discuss how to elicit a takeaway from a question which seems to have none.

What is a takeaway? It is a small note to yourself which you would do well to remember while going for the exam. Even if you don’t remember the exact property you jotted down, knowing that such a property exists is enough. You can always try it on a couple of numbers in the test to recall the exact content.

GMAT Tip of the Week: The Data Sufficiency Reward System

GMAT Tip of the Week: The Data Sufficiency Reward System

If you’ve studied for the GMAT for a while, you likely have a decent understanding of the answer choices:

(A) Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked;
(B) Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked;
(C) BOTH statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question asked, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient;
(D) EACH statement ALONE is sufficient to answer the question asked;
(E) Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question asked, and additional data are needed

How the GMAT Can Help You in Your Everyday Life

How the GMAT Can Help You in Your Everyday Life

Many students feel that the GMAT is only necessary to get into business school, and otherwise serves no real purpose in their everyday lives. I, as a GMAT enthusiast (and overall math nerd), see a lot of real world applications in the concepts being tested on this exam. It’s actually somewhat surprising how often splitting the cheque at a restaurant or calculating investment returns requires me to delve into my GMAT knowledge. Such an instance just happened the other weekend, and it’s the kind of story I’d like to use to illustrate how pervasive GMAT knowledge is in daily life.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
Advanced Number Properties on the GMAT - Part III

Advanced Number Properties on the GMAT - Part III

Continuing our discussion on number properties, today we will discuss how factorials affect the behavior of odd and even integers. Since we are going to deal with factorials, positive integers will be our concern. Using a question, we will see how factorials are divided.

Advanced Number Properties on the GMAT - Part II

Advanced Number Properties on the GMAT - Part II

Before we get started, be sure to take a look at Part I of this article. Number properties concepts come across as pretty easy, theoretically, but they have some of the toughest questions. Today let’s take a look at some properties of prime numbers and their sum. Note that don’t try to “learn” all the takeaways you come across for number properties – it will be very stressful. Instead, try to understand why the properties are such so that if you get a question related to some such properties, you can replicate the results effortlessly.

GMAT Tip of the Week: The Heart of Data Sufficiency

GMAT Tip of the Week: The Heart of Data Sufficiency

Data Sufficiency is a game as much as it’s a “problem.” Look at the statistics in the Veritas Prep Question Bank and you’ll see that most Data Sufficiency questions are created with a particular trap answer in mind and that at least 1-2 answer choices are rarely-if-ever chosen.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips