Archive : GMAT Challenge Question

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GMAT-esque Challenge Question: Today is the Day... To Get Better at GMAT Math

GMAT-esque Challenge Question: Today is the Day... To Get Better at GMAT Math

It’s March 15, and now that the hysteria over Pi Day (good ol’ 3-14) is over, the true GMAT math geeks can celebrate an even more exciting use of math and dates (and, no, we don’t mean impressing your dates with math tricks. Not that that’s not a good idea, of course).

Today is 3/15, a not-all-that-unique case of the month being a factor of the day (3 is a factor of 15, so you could factor the date 3/15 into 1/5. It’s almost like it’s January 5th all over again!).

GMAT Tip of the Week AND GMAT Challenge Question: Two-for-Twentieth!

GMAT Tip of the Week AND GMAT Challenge Question: Two-for-Twentieth!

Hello again readers, and happy May Twentieth!  In honor of that 2 in 5/20 (the day before The End of the World, of course), today’s post is dual-purposed in two ways:  We have a GMAT challenge question and a GMAT tip of the week, and the GMAT tip of the week is actually two in one.  First, take a look at this challenge Critical Reasoning question:

A recent Bloomberg Businessweek article cited that the average GMAT score for 20 and 21-year olds is 575, while for 22 and 23 year olds it is only 539.  Therefore, all potential business school applicants should be advised to take the GMAT while they’re younger so that they can expect a higher score.

GMAT Challenge Question: Two For Thursday

GMAT Challenge Question: Two For Thursday

Back by popular demand…let’s try another GMAT Challenge Question today, and since we’re doing two consecutive days of challenge questions, let’s just go all out.  As Ernie Banks would say, let’s play two.  The questions, courtesy of San Diego GMAT instructor Matt Douglas, our 2010 worldwide Instructor of the Year, are below; post your answers in the comments field and check back later today for detailed solutions.

GMAT Challenge Question: Sentence Correction Is the (Tar) Pits

GMAT Challenge Question: Sentence Correction Is the (Tar) Pits

Once again, it’s time for a GMAT challenge question!  This installment  features the dreaded maximum-word-count, everything-underlined Sentence Correction device.  Can you avoid getting sucked into a La Brea Tar Pit of wasted time?  Here’s the question, courtesy of Boston GMAT tutor Ashley Newman-Owens; check back later for the solution and some tips for working through a problem like this:

GMAT Challenge Question: Taxing Sentence Correction

GMAT Challenge Question: Taxing Sentence Correction

It’s time for another GMAT Challenge  Question, and it’s also about time to start thinking about your taxes – April 15 is just over two months away, and remember that February is a short month!  With those two things in mind, we  thought we’d let you audit an IRS-related Sentence Correction question.  Submit your answers in the comments field and we’ll be back later today with the solution and explanation.

GMAT Challenge Question: Bet You “Kant” Pick The Correct Idiom...

GMAT Challenge Question: Bet You “Kant” Pick The Correct Idiom...

Hello again, everyone!  It’s time for another GMAT Challenge Question, this time from the verbal side of the exam.  Try your hand at this Sentence Correction question, log your answers and explanations in the comments field, and we’ll be back with the official solution and an important lesson regarding GMAT Sentence Correction.

GMAT Challenge Question: Blackout Dates

GMAT Challenge Question: Blackout Dates

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!  With today as one of the busiest travel dates of the year, and undoubtedly a blackout date for your frequent-flier or rewards-miles program, we’ll offer this Data Sufficiency question for which blackouts can play a prominent role.

GMAT Challenge Question: The Squared Circle

GMAT Challenge Question: The Squared Circle

It’s time again for another GMAT Challenge Question, and this one features a favorite GMAT theme: you’re provided no actual numbers and need to use your conceptual knowledge to determine a proportional relationship.  Please post your answers in the comments field, and we’ll be back later today with a detailed solution:

GMAT Challenge Question: Solve This Stats Problem, Stat!

GMAT Challenge Question: Solve This Stats Problem, Stat!

Set A consists of integers -9, 8, 3, 10, and J; Set B consists of integers -2, 5, 0, 7, -6, and T. If R is the median of Set A and W is the mode of set B, and R^W is a factor of 34, what is the value of T if J is negative?

GMAT Challenge Question: Prime Time

GMAT Challenge Question: Prime Time

It’s time again for another GMAT challenge question, and this one focuses on one of the quantitative section’s favorite themes: prime factors.

Please submit your answers in the comments field, and check back later today for the solution and a more-thorough explanation of prime factors!

GMAT Challenge Question: Your Opponent is the Exponent

GMAT Challenge Question: Your Opponent is the Exponent

It’s time again for another Veritas Prep Challenge Question. Once again you’ll find that exponents will play a fairly significant role in this question. Stay tuned to the GMAT Tip of the Week post tomorrow for an explanation of this question and a quick checklist for everything you need to know about GMAT exponents.

GMAT Challenge Question: Too Many Twos

GMAT Challenge Question: Too Many Twos

Right at this second it’s September 2nd, with 2 days until the college football season starts, once again with too many teams in the Big Ten. In honor of all of these twos and toos, we present you a GMAT problem that features too many twos:

GMAT Challenge Question: The Red Stapler

GMAT Challenge Question: The Red Stapler

Studying for the GMAT does not have to be a chore — it can certainly be made enjoyable through fun challenge problems! That’s why we try to keep things lighthearted (yet effective) when it comes to your GMAT preparation.