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99th Percentile GMAT Score or Bust! Lesson 6: Practice Tests Aren't Real Tests

99th Percentile GMAT Score or Bust! Lesson 6: Practice Tests Aren't Real Tests

Veritas Prep’s Ravi Sreerama is the #1-ranked GMAT instructor in the world (by GMATClub) and a fixture in the new Veritas Prep Live Online format as well as in Los Angeles-area classrooms.  He’s beloved by his students for the philosophy “99th percentile or bust!”, a signal that all students can score in the elusive 99th percentile with the proper techniques and preparation.   In this “9 for 99thvideo series, Ravi shares some of his favorite strategies to efficiently conquer the GMAT and enter that 99th percentile.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Prep, GMAT Tips
Think Like Einstein to Answer GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions

Think Like Einstein to Answer GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions

I recently read Manjit Kumar’s, Quantum, which is about the philosophical disagreement between Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein with respect to the nature of reality.  In high school physics, we learned about Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle, which posits that we can never know both the position and the momentum of an electron with absolute certainty. The more precisely we measure an electron’s position, the less we know about its momentum, and vice versa.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
Catching Sneaky Remainder Questions on the GMAT

Catching Sneaky Remainder Questions on the GMAT

One of my favorite topics to teach is remainders. We learn about remainders in grade school and when I introduce the topic in class, the response is often amused incredulity. It isn’t hard to see that when 16 is divided by 7, the remainder is 2. How can it possibly be the case that something we learned in fifth grade is included on a test that helps determine where we go to graduate school?

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
How to Compare Effectively During the GMAT

How to Compare Effectively During the GMAT

A lot of GMAT test takers complain about insufficient time. This is understandable as far as the Verbal section is concerned. We all have different reading speeds and that itself accounts for a lot of time issues in the Verbal section. Obviously then there are other factors – your comfort with the language, your comprehension skills, your conceptual understanding of the Verbal question types, etc.

GMAT Tip of the Week: 10 Must-Know Divisibility Rules For the GMAT (#3 Will Blow Your Mind!)

GMAT Tip of the Week: 10 Must-Know Divisibility Rules For the GMAT (#3 Will Blow Your Mind!)

You clicked, didn’t you? You’re helpless when presented with an enumerated list and a teaser that at least one of the items is advertised to be – but probably won’t be – mind-blowing. (In this case it kind of is…if not mind-blowing, it’s at least very powerful). So in this case, let’s use click bait for good and enumerated lists to talk about numbers. Here are 10 important (and “BuzzFeedy”) divisibility rules you should know heading into the GMAT:

Should I Take the GMAT or the GRE?

Should I Take the GMAT or the GRE?

I currently work at a top business school and am therefore able to keep my finger right on the pulse of b-school trends. Earlier this week, I had a discussion with our Director of Admissions about the GRE. It seems that over the past several years, there has been a subtle migration away from GMAT exclusivity among the top b-schools for several reasons.

Finding the Product of Factors on GMAT Questions

Finding the Product of Factors on GMAT Questions

We have discussed how to find the factors of a number and their properties in these two posts:

Writing Factors of an Ugly Number

Factors of Perfect Squares

GMAT Tip of the Week: Small Numbers Lead to Big Scores

GMAT Tip of the Week: Small Numbers Lead to Big Scores

The last thing you want to see on your score report at the end of the GMAT is a small number. Whether that number is in the 300s (total score) or in the single-digits (percentile), your nightmares leading up to the test probably include lots of small numbers flashing on the screen as you finish the test. So what’s one of the most helpful tools you have to keep small numbers from appearing on the screen?

5 Reasons That Studying for the GMAT Sucks

5 Reasons That Studying for the GMAT Sucks

Let’s face it. Except for the folks who write the test and prepare you for the test, no one really loves the GMAT. Any anyone who tells you otherwise either scored an 800 with no prep or is lying.

But self-inflicted misery loves company, so in no particular order, let’s take a look at some of the things that suck and more importantly, how to cope:

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Prep
How to Solve Relative Rate of Work Questions on the GMAT

How to Solve Relative Rate of Work Questions on the GMAT

Today, we look at the relative rate concept  of work, rate and time – the parallel of relative speed of distance, speed and time.

But before we do that, we will first look at one fundamental principle of work, rate and time (which has a parallel in distance, speed and time).

Say, there is a straight long track with a red flag at one end. Mr A is standing on the track 100 feet away from the flag and Mr B is standing on the track at a distance 700 feet away from the flag. So they have a distance of 600 feet between them. They start walking towards each other. Where will they meet? Is it necessary that they will meet at 400 feet from the red flag – the mid point of the distance between them? Think about it – say Mr A walks very slowly and Mr B is super fast. Of the 600 feet between them, Mr A will cover very little distance and Mr B will cover most of the distance. So where they meet depends on their rate of walking. They will not necessarily meet at the mid point. When do they meet at the mid point? When their rate of walking is the same. When they both cover equal distance.

GMAT Tip of the Week: Eazy E Shows You How To Take Your Quant Score Straight Outta Compton And Straight To Cambridge

GMAT Tip of the Week: Eazy E Shows You How To Take Your Quant Score Straight Outta Compton And Straight To Cambridge

If you listened to any hip hop themed radio today, the day of the Straight Outta Compton movie premiere, you may have heard interviews with Dr. Dre. You almost certainly heard interviews with Ice Cube. And depending on how old school the station is there’s even a chance you heard from DJ Yella or MC Ren.

The Importance of Estimation on the GMAT

The Importance of Estimation on the GMAT

In the first session of every new class I teach, I try to emphasize the power and effectiveness of estimating when dealing with potentially complex calculations. No one ever disputes that this is a good approach, but an unspoken assumption is that while you may save a bit of time by estimating, it isn’t absolutely crucial to do so. After all, how long does it take to do a little arithmetic? The problem is that, under pressure, hard arithmetic can cause us to freeze. To illustrate this, I’ll ask, “quick, what’s 1.3 divided by 3.2?” This is usually greeted by blank stares or nervous laughter. But when I ask “okay, what’s 1 divided by 3?” they see the point: trying to solve 1.3/3.2 won’t just be time-consuming, but can easily lead to a careless mistake prompted by arithmetical paralysis.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
Identifying the Paradox on GMAT Critical Reasoning Questions

Identifying the Paradox on GMAT Critical Reasoning Questions

Let’s take a look at a very tricky GMAT Prep critical reasoning problem today. Problems such as these make CR more attractive than RC and SC to people who have a Quantitative bent of mind. It’s one of the “explain the paradox” problems, which usually tend to be easy if you know exactly how to tackle them, but the issue here is that it is hard to put your finger on the paradox.

GMAT Tip of the Week: Jim Harbaugh Says Milk Does A GMAT Score Good

GMAT Tip of the Week: Jim Harbaugh Says Milk Does A GMAT Score Good

Someday when he’s not coaching football, playing with the Oakland Athletics, visiting with the Supreme Court, or Tweeting back and forth with Lil Wayne and Nicki Minaj, Jim Harbaugh should sit down and take the GMAT.

Because if his interaction with a young, milk-drinking fan is any indication, Harbaugh understands one of the key secrets to success on the GMAT Quant section:

A Secret Shortcut to Increase Your GMAT Score

A Secret Shortcut to Increase Your GMAT Score

The GMAT is an exam that aims to test how you think about things. Many people have heard this mantra when studying for the GMAT, but it’s not always clear what it means. While there are many formulae and concepts to know ahead of taking the exam, you will be constantly thinking throughout the exam about how to solve the question in front of you. The GMAT specializes in asking questions that require you to think about the solution, not just to plug in numbers mindlessly and return whatever your calculator tells you (including typos and misplaced decimals).

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
Dr. Larry Rudner Endorses Veritas Prep's GMAT Practice Tests

Dr. Larry Rudner Endorses Veritas Prep's GMAT Practice Tests

Three years ago this month, the team here at Veritas Prep launched a new project to completely reinvent how we build and administer GMAT practice tests for our students. A home-built system that started with the GMAT Question Bank (launched in October, 2012) soon grew into a whole computer-adaptive testing system containing thousands of questions and employing Item Response Theory to produce some of the most authentic practice tests in the industry. We launched our new practice test in May, 2013, and five months later we made five tests available to everyone. We later added two more tests, bringing the total number to seven that anyone could get. (Veritas Prep students get five additional computer-adaptive tests, for a total of 12.)

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Prep
3 Important Concepts for Statistics Questions on the GMAT

3 Important Concepts for Statistics Questions on the GMAT

We have discussed these three concepts of statistics in detail:

– Arithmetic mean is the number that can represent/replace all the numbers of the sequence. It lies somewhere in between the smallest and the largest values.

– Median is the middle number (in case the total number of numbers is odd) or the average of two middle numbers (in case the total number of numbers is even).

GMAT Tip of the Week: Behind the Scenes of Your GMAT Score

GMAT Tip of the Week: Behind the Scenes of Your GMAT Score

Among the most frequent questions we receive here at Veritas Prep headquarters (sadly, “How much am I allowed to tip my instructor?” is not one of them!) is the genre of “On my most recent practice test, I got X right and Y wrong and only Z wrong in a row… Why was my score higher/lower than my other test with A right and B wrong and C wrong in a row?” inquiries from students desperately trying to understand the GMAT scoring algorithm. We’ve talked previously in this space about why simply counting rights and wrongs isn’t all that great a predictor of your score. And perhaps the best advice possible relates to our Sentence Correction advice here a few months ago: Accept that there are some things you can’t change and focus on making a difference where you can.

How to Evaluate the Entire Sentence on Sentence Correction GMAT Questions

How to Evaluate the Entire Sentence on Sentence Correction GMAT Questions

As the Donald Trump sideshow continues to dominate American news, politics is again being pushed to the forefront as the country gears up for an election in 15 months. The nominees are not yet confirmed, but many candidates are jockeying for position, trying to get their names to resonate with the American population. This election will necessarily have a new candidate for both parties, as Barack Obama will have completed the maximum of two elected terms allowed by the Constitution (via the 22nd amendment).

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Tips, Gmat Verbal
1 Strategy That Will Lead You to Better Pacing on the GMAT

1 Strategy That Will Lead You to Better Pacing on the GMAT

Let’s look at a vastly important testing issue that is largely misunderstood and its seriousness under-appreciated.  Throughout multiple years of tutoring, this has been one of the most common and detrimental problems that I have had to work to correct in my students.  It pertains to the entire GMAT exam, but is typically more relevant to the quant section as students often struggle more with pacing during quant.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Tips
What to Do When Math Fails You on the GMAT!

What to Do When Math Fails You on the GMAT!

They say Mathematics is a perfect Science. There is a debate over this among scientists but we can definitely say that Mathematical methods are not perfect so we cannot use them blindly. We could very well use the standard method for some given numbers and get stranded with “no solution.” The issue is what do we do when that happens?

GMAT Tip of the Week: Kanye West's Everything I Am Teaches Critical Reasoning

GMAT Tip of the Week: Kanye West's Everything I Am Teaches Critical Reasoning

“Everything I’m not made me everything I am,” says Kanye West in his surprisingly-humble track Everything I Am. And while, unsurprisingly, much of what he’s talking about is silencing his critics, he might as well be rapping about making you an elite critic on Critical Reasoning problems. Because when it comes to some of the most challenging Critical Reasoning problems on the GMAT, everything they’re not makes them everything they are. Which is a convoluted way of saying this:

Find Time-Saving Strategies for GMAT Test Day

Find Time-Saving Strategies for GMAT Test Day

I’ve often heard from people studying for the GMAT that they would score much higher on the test if there were no time limit to each section. The material covered on the exam is not inherently complicated, but the combination of subtle wordplay and constant stress about time management creates an environment where test takers often rush through prompts and misinterpret questions. Unfortunately, time management and stress management are two of the major skills being tested on the GMAT, so the time limit isn’t going away any time soon (despite my frequent letters to the GMAC). Instead, it’s worth mastering simple techniques to save time and extrapolate patterns based on smaller samples.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
Expression vs Equation on GMAT

Expression vs Equation on GMAT

Today, we want to take up a conceptual discussion on expressions and equations and the differences between them. The concept is quite simple but a discussion on these is warranted because of the similarity between the two.

An expression contains numbers, variables and operators.

GMAT Tip of the Week: Shake & Bake Your Way To Function Success

GMAT Tip of the Week: Shake & Bake Your Way To Function Success

For many of us, cooking a delicious homemade meal and solving a challenge-level GMAT math problem are equally daunting challenges. So many steps, so many places to make a mistake…why can’t there be an easier way? Well, the fine folks at Kraft foods solved your first problem years ago with a product called “Shake and Bake.” You take a piece of chicken (your input), stick in the bag of seasoning, shake it up, bake it, and voila – you have yourself a delicious meal with minimal effort. So gourmet level cooking is now nothing to fear…but what about those challenging GMAT quant problems?

When You'll Need to Bring Outside Knowledge to the GMAT

When You'll Need to Bring Outside Knowledge to the GMAT

It is often said that outside knowledge is not required on the GMAT. The idea is that everyone should be on relatively equal footing when starting to prepare for this exam, minimizing the advantage that someone with a B.Comm might have over someone with an engineering or philosophy degree. Of course, it’s difficult to determine at what point does outside knowledge begin and end. Knowing that there are 26 letters in the (English) alphabet or that blue and red are different colors is never explicitly mentioned in the GMAT preparation, but the concepts certainly can come up in GMAT questions.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
When Not to Use Number Plugging on the GMAT

When Not to Use Number Plugging on the GMAT

A few weeks back we discussed the kind of questions which beg you to think of the process of elimination – a strategy probably next only to number plugging in popularity.

Today we discuss the kind of questions which beg you to stay away from number plugging (but somehow, people still insist on using it because they see variables).

GMAT Tip of the Week: Oh Thank Heaven For Seven-Eleven

GMAT Tip of the Week: Oh Thank Heaven For Seven-Eleven

A week after the Fourth of July, a lesser-known but certainly-important holiday occurs each year. Tomorrow, friends, is 7-11, a day to enjoy free Slurpees at 7-11 stores, to roll some dice at the craps table, and to honor your favorite prime numbers. So to celebrate 7-11, let’s talk about these two important prime numbers.

Interpreting the Language of the GMAT

Interpreting the Language of the GMAT

Everyone who writes the GMAT must speak English to some degree. Since English is the default language of business, the GMAT is administered exclusively in that language. Some people feel that this is unfair. If you take an exam in your mother tongue, you tend to do better than if you took the exam in your second, third or even fourth language (I consider Klingon as my fourth language). However, even if you’re a native English speaker, the GMAT offers many linguistic challenges that make many people feel that they don’t actually speak the language. (¿Habla GMAT?)

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
Attack Data Sufficiency GMAT Questions from the Weakest Point

Attack Data Sufficiency GMAT Questions from the Weakest Point

It is a common axiom that the best strategy in any competition is to attack your opponent at his weakest point. If you’ve been studying for the GMAT for any length of time, you’ve probably noticed that not all Data Sufficiency statements are created equal. At times the statements are mind-bendingly complex. Other times we can evaluate a statement almost instantaneously, without needing to simplify or calculate.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
Solving Inference-Based 700+ Level Official GMAT Questions

Solving Inference-Based 700+ Level Official GMAT Questions

Sometimes, to solve some tough questions, we need to make inferences. Those inferences may not be apparent at first but once you practice, they do become intuitive. Today we will discuss one such inference based high level question of an official GMAT practice test.

Question: In a village of 100 households, 75 have at least one DVD player, 80 have at least one cell phone, and 55 have at least one MP3 player. If x and y are respectively the greatest and lowest possible number of households that have all three of these devices, x – y is:

GMAT Tip of the Week: Raising Your Data Sufficiency Accuracy From 33% To 99%

GMAT Tip of the Week: Raising Your Data Sufficiency Accuracy From 33% To 99%

You’re looking at a Data Sufficiency problem and you’re feeling the pressure. You’re midway through the GMAT Quantitative section and your mind is spinning from the array of concepts and questions that have been thrown at you. You know you nailed that tricky probability question a few problems earlier and you hope you got that last crazy geometry question right. When you look at Statement 1 your mind draws a blank: whether it’s too many variables or too many numbers or too tricky a concept, you just can’t process it. So you look at Statement 2 and feel relief. It’s nowhere near sufficient, as just about anyone even considering graduate school would know immediately. So you smile as you cross off choices A and D on your noteboard, saying to yourself: “Good, at least I have a 33% chance now.”

How to Interpret GMAT Critical Reasoning Questions

How to Interpret GMAT Critical Reasoning Questions

Interpreting what is being asked on a question is arguably the most important skill required in order to perform well on the GMAT. After all, since the topics are taken from high school level material, and the test is designed to be difficult for college graduates, the difficulty must often come from more than just the material. In fact, it is very common on the GMAT to find that you got “the right answer to the wrong question.” This phrase is so well-known that it merits quotation marks (and eventually perhaps its own reality show).

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Tips, Gmat Verbal
99th Percentile GMAT Score or Bust! Lesson 5: Procrastinate to Calculate

99th Percentile GMAT Score or Bust! Lesson 5: Procrastinate to Calculate

Veritas Prep’s Ravi Sreerama is the #1-ranked GMAT instructor in the world (by GMATClub) and a fixture in the new Veritas Prep Live Online format as well as in Los Angeles-area classrooms.  He’s beloved by his students for the philosophy “99th percentile or bust!”, a signal that all students can score in the elusive 99th percentile with the proper techniques and preparation.   In this “9 for 99thvideo series, Ravi shares some of his favorite strategies to efficiently conquer the GMAT and enter that 99th percentile.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
When to Make Assumptions on GMAT Problem Solving Questions

When to Make Assumptions on GMAT Problem Solving Questions

Today we will discuss the flip side of “do not assume anything in Data Sufficiency” i.e. we will discuss “go ahead and assume in Problem Solving!”

Problem solving questions have five definite options, that is, “cannot be determined” and “data not sufficient” are not given as options. So this means that in all cases, data is sufficient for us to answer the question. So as long as the data we assume conforms to all the data given in the question, we are free to assume and make the problem simpler for ourselves. The concept is not new – you have been already doing it all along – every time you assume the total to be 100 in percentage questions or the value of n to be 0 or 1, you are assuming that as long as your assumed data conforms to the data given, the relation should hold for every value of the unknown. So the relation should be the same when n is 0 and also the same when n is 1.

GMAT Tip of the Week: Talking About Equality

GMAT Tip of the Week: Talking About Equality

If you’ve ever struggled with algebra, wondered which operations you were allowed to perform, or been upset when you were told that the operation you just performed was incorrect, this post is for you. Algebra is all about equality.

What does that mean?

Consider the statement:

GMAT or GRE: How Will MBA Admissions Officers View My GRE Score?

GMAT or GRE: How Will MBA Admissions Officers View My GRE Score?

Over the past five years or so, more business schools have been jumping on the GRE bandwagon by accepting either a GMAT or a GRE score. The percentage of candidates to top MBA programs who apply with only a GRE score is growing, but it’s still very small — less than 5% at most schools.

This leads many candidates to wonder how applying with a GRE score may be viewed by MBA admissions committees.

Filed in: GMAT, GRE, MBA Admissions
GMAC Announces Two New GMAT Policies, Both In Your Favor!

GMAC Announces Two New GMAT Policies, Both In Your Favor!

MBA applicants, your path to submitting a score report that you can be proud of just got a bit smoother. In an announcement to test-takers today, GMAC revealed two new policies that each stand out as particularly student-friendly:

Filed in: GMAT
The Importance of Recognizing Patterns on the GMAT

The Importance of Recognizing Patterns on the GMAT

In life, we often see certain patterns repeat over and over again. After all, if everything in life were unpredictable, we’d have a hard time forecasting tomorrow’s weather or how long it will take to go to work next week. Luckily, many patterns repeat in recurring, predictable patterns. A simple example is a calendar. If tomorrow is Friday, then the following day will be Saturday, and Sunday comes afterwards (credit: Rebecca Black). Moreover, if today is Friday, then 7 days from now will also be Friday, and 70 days from now will also be Friday, and onwards ad infinitum (even with leap years). These patterns are what allow us to predict things with 100% certainty.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips
The GMAT Shortcut That Can Help You Solve a Variety of Quantitative Questions

The GMAT Shortcut That Can Help You Solve a Variety of Quantitative Questions

One thing I’m constantly encouraging my students to do is to seek horizontal connections between seemingly disparate problems. Often times, two quantitative questions that would seem to fall into separate categories can be solved using the same approach. When we have to sift through dozens of techniques and strategies under pressure, we’re likely to become paralyzed by indecision. If, however, we have a small number of go-to approaches, we can quickly consider all available options and arrive at one that will work in any given context.

Filed in: GMAT, GMAT Quant, GMAT Tips